Skip to main content

Full text of "The Duluth Herald"

See other formats




— ^ — ■ 

LIST wnm 



I h 

a THE DULUTH HERALD 



HfSTORfCAL 




VOLUME XXXI— NO. 38. 



THURSDAY EVENING, R4AY 22, 1913. 



TWO CENTS. 



u> 



JAPANESE OFFICIALS 
DISSATISFIED WITH 
WASHINGTON REPLY 



Chinda Is Urged to Press 

Tokio's Views on Terms 

of Treaty. 



JAPANESE EMPEROR 

SUDDENLY TAKEN ILL 



Ebara Says the Orientals, 

Should Be on Basis With \ 

Europeans. 



Statesmen Studying Situa- 
tion Predict Peaceful 
Solution. 



Toklo. May 22. — The reply of the 
United States government to the Jap- 
anese pretest In regard to the Cali- 
fornia alien land ownership legislation, 
In saying that It does not Involve any 
violation of the treaty between the 
United States and Japan, has caused 
great disappointment In official and 
other circles here. 

The Japanese foreign office considers 
It unsatisfactory, as it does not men- 
tion any Intention on the part of the 
government at Washington to take of- 
ficial steps to nullify the act passed by 
the California legislature. 

The Japanes-e foreign minister is urg- 
ing upon Viscount Clilnda, Japanese 
ambassador at Washington, the neces- 
sity of presiding the Japanese interpre- 
tation of the American-Japanese treaty. 

Secretary of State Hryans proposal 
to refer the question to a referendum 
In the state of California Is not received 
with favor here as the result is con- 
sidered doubtful. 




In Lawyers' View. 

Washington, May 22. — The basis of 
the state department's contention that 
the California alien land act does not 
in terms violate the treaty of 1911, 
was a careful scrutiny by all the law- 
yers of the cabinet of the language 
of the law and the treaty. Save upon 
the single point that In depriving Jap- 
anese in California of the right of in- 
heritance to real estate, they conclud- 
ed there was no ground for complaint. 

And in view of the expressed declar- 

(Continued on page 6, third column.) 

STRIKERS DISOBEY 
LEADERS OF I. W. W. 



EMPEROR YOSHIHITO. 

Toklo, May 22. — Emperor Yoshihito 
of Japan, was taken ill today. The 
physicians in attendance declare that 
he is suffering from Inflammation of 
tile lungs. 

The emperor is In a state of high 
fever. Eight court physicians are in 
constant attendance. 

The emperor of Japan succeeded his 
father on July 30, 1912. He is in his 
thirty-fourth year and has three sons, 
the eldest of whom is Crown Prince 
Hirohito. just 12 years old. 

The emperor previously has suf- 
fered from lung trouble, and in the 
course of one attack, in 1908, his con- 
dition was very serious. 





Picket System at Paterson 
Silk Mills Is Aban- 
doned. 

Paterson, X. J., May 22. — Not more 
than twenty strike pickets turned out 
today to jeer the hands that have re- 
turned to work in the Price silk mill, 
and there was no disturbance of any 
kind. The call of the Industrial Work- 
ers of the World leaders for a general 
turnout of pickets failed to meet with 
general response, and shops and mills 
that have been picketed regularly in 
the past had none on hand this morn- 
ing. 

The manufacturers assert that the 
strike is breaking at all points except 
in the big mills. The strike leaders, 
on the other hand, say the defections 
have been few and that the strike will 
go on unabated. 

NEBRASKAMOB 
FOILED^AGAIN 

Kansas Sheriff and Depu- 
ties Protect Negro at 
Hiawatha. 



WALKER DE 



Banker Who Took Poison 

By Mistake Succumbs 

at Macon. 



Armed Men in Motors 

Storm Jail to Get 

Prisoner. 



Hiawatha, Kan., May 22. — A second 
attempt by a band of men from Falls 
City, Neb., to lynch Walter Ballew, a 
negro held in jail here charged with 
an attack upon Mrs. Anna Keller of 
Falls City last Sunday night, was 
frustrated early today by Sheriff 
Moore and Under-Shcriff Bartlow, who 

r^-pulsed a desperate attack upon the 
jail in the course of which the door 
was battered down with a heavy log, 
window panes broken and walls 
scarred by a fusillade of bullets. 
Cnme 1b Hotor Car*. 

Five motor cars bearing more than 
a score of armed Falls City men drove 
up to the jail shortly after 2 o'clock 
this morning. Tlie sound of gunshots 
and the patter of bullets on the walls 
was the first signal of attack. Under- 
Sheriff Bartlow, whose residence is in 
the jail building, had stationed depu- 
ties in anticipation of trouble. 

Four of the men of the mob burst 
open the heavy door leading Into his 
living apartment. In the corridor they 
were confronted by the under-sheriff 
who at the point of a revolver forced 
them out of the building. Deputies 
guarded the way of communication 
between the sheriff's apartments and 
the cell rooms, and also every window. 

Meanwhile the shouts and shooting 
had attracted scores of citizens. Their 
arguments and the determined stand 
of the officers finally induced the de- 
parture of the as.^allants. They re- 
turned to Falls City after being as- 
sured tliat Ballew would be returned 
to Nebraska for trial as soon as legal 
formalities were compiled with. 
\Va« Second Attempt. 

The first attempt t(j wrest Ballew 
from the hands of authorities oc- 
curred Tuesday night. At that time a 
P'alls City party, after a demonstration 
about the Jail building, was Induced to 
return home by argumcnta of the of- 
ficials. 



lowan Tries to Kill Himself 
in the Same Man- 
ner. 



Macon, Ga., May 22. — After bravely 
facing for a week the inevitable result 
of his mistake In taking a poisonous 
tablet, B. Sanders Walker, the young 
Macon banker, died this morning at 
1:35 o'clock. Members of the family 
had gathered at his bedside several 
days ago, when the doctors announced 
there was no hope for him. 

When the end neared today Walker 
gave no sign of flincliing, but went to 
his death with a resignation that has 
rendered the case more than usually in- 
teresting throughout the country. Dur- 
ing tlie last day Walker was under the 
influence of opiates most of the time, 
but in conscious intervals gave evidence 
that he was not suffering. 

Doctor)* Are Reticent. 

Scores of sympatl^etic messages were 
received by the family, and many of 
them were in the nature of inciuirles as 
to the treatment being given Mr. Walk- 
er. It has been impossible to find out 
definitely what course the physicians 
took, as they have refused to talk, ex- 
cept to trace briefly the progress of the 
poison's slow but deadly, effect. 

Members of the family are quoted as 
expressing much dissatisfaction with 
some of the reports tliat liave originat- 
ed in Macon. They declared that Mr. 
Walker remained constantly in his bed- 
room after it was discovered that he 
had taken the tablet of poison in mis- 
take for a headache remedy. 

lo«van AttemptH Suicide. 

Sioux City, Iowa, May 22. — Robert 
Palmer, a city salesman, who took sev- 
eral poison tablets last night with 
suicidal Intent, while in the lobby of 
a leading hotel, was still in a critical 
condition today. Doctors held out a 
slight hope for recovery because an- 
tidotes were quickly given and the 
contents of the stomach were pumped 
out. 

Palmer formerly was a star baseball, 
football player and track athlete. The 
poison he took was the same as that 
taken by mistake by B. Sanders Walk- 
er of Macon, Ga. 

DANIELS DEMANDS 
PROBE OF HILL'S FATE 



Secretary of Navy Not Sat- 
isfied With Official 
Report. 

Washington, May 22. — .Secretary 
Daniels has called upon the command- 
ing officers at the naval academy for 
a supplemt r.tal report on the recent 
mysterious death there of Lieut. Rich- 
ard Hill, V. R. A., whose end was 
thought to have been self-inflicted. 

The young officer's death followed 
almost immediately on a visit to his 
fiancee, Miss Henrietta Erwln of St. 
Louis, who was visiting relatives here. 
The young couple were to have been 
married shortly, and apparently Hill 
was looking forward eagerly to the 
event. 

The report returned by the navy 
academy authorities was said to be so 
meager and to throw so little light 
on the circumstances of the officer'a 
death that Secretary Daniels Insisted 
that the record In the case be made 
more complete. 



FARRELL QUIZZED 
ABOUT PRICES MADE 
BY STEEL COMPANY 



NEW STRIKE ISIIEGUN IN THE 



^ Si, 



Denies "Trust" Had Secret 

Agreement With Harri- 

man Lines. 



Schwab Tells of Advan- 
tages of Ownership of 
Ore Reserves. 



New York, May 22. — James A. Far- 
rell, president of the United States 
corporation, took the witness stand 
for cross-examination In the hearings 
of the governments suit to dissolve 
the corporation under the Sherman an- 
ti-trust law. He was first questioned 
by Judge Dickinson, counsel for the 
government, on the price list published 
by the corporation's subsidiaries. He 
reiterated that by means of these lists 
It Is generally true that our prices 
are known to the trade." 

"Did the United States Steel corpo- 
ration have a secret agreement with 
the Harriman lines by which they were 
given preferential prices?" asked the 
government attorney. 

No Secret Agreement. 

"There was no secret agreement," 
said Mr. Farrell. "A great many know 
of the agreement. There were con- 
tracts between the Harriman lines and 
our companies and the sales were dis- 
tributed broadcast among our sales- 
men." 

"Did you ever have a secret contract 
wltji the American Can company." 

"The Can company was given a price 
lower than other buyers, but that Is 
because it is a larger buyer," replied 
the witness. 

He did not consider the agreement 
secret. He added that with some 



(Continued on page 6, first column.) 

INYEStlGafrPTY OF 
GIRLS m ST. LOUiS 




WEST VIRGIIIA COAL FIELDS; 
SENATE IN JJIRY IS PROBABLE 

1 ,000 MINERS 
IN NEW RIVER 
REGION QUIT 



THREE EMPERORS MEET AT GERMAN CAPITAL 



EMPEROK WILIAM II, 
Of (jermany. 



EPISCOPAL. WOMEN'S 
PLEA RIADE IN VAIN 



Missouri State Senate Sub- 
poenas Managers and 
Employes. 

St. Louis, Mo., May 22. — The state 
senate wage Investigation committee 
today subpoenaed the managers and 
girl employes of candy and box fac- 
tories to testify as to working condi- 
tions in those plants. 

This action was determined on by 
the committee after It Irad been in- 
formed that the girls in such places 
are poorly paid and work long hours. 



^ ^ 

^ WISCONSIN CHICK H.*S ^ 

^ 1 EYE, 2 TEETH, 6 TOES. ^ 

^ * ■«■ 

^ Marinette. Wis., May T^ — The ^ 
^ old «nw "»»oure rh hen*H teeth," ^ 
^ in threatened ^vith annihilation if ^ 
^ Marinette hens contlnne to hatch ^ 
^ ohIekenH like one exhibited to<lay ^ 
^ by Andrew Gipp, n loeal ehlcken ^ 
funoier. He hart a little chick ^ 
which had two tiny teeth visible ^ 
in itM hill. It Ilvert only a few ^ 
minutcM after it had pecked or ^ 
^ Knawed ItH way out of its Hhell. ^ 
Mi The freak bail only one eye and ^ 
^ only three toeti on each foot. S 

* * 



Oregon Diocese Tables Re- 
quest for Equal Repre- 
sentation. 

Portland, Or., aiay 22.-»-Efforts of the 
Oregon Equal Suffrage a.<?80ciation to 
extend the sphere of women into the 
governing body of the Protestant Epis- 
copal church failed last night when the 
twenty-fifth annv.al convention of the 
diocese of Oregon unanimously laid 
on the table a resolution demanding 
representation in the diocesan conven- 
tion. 

Chancellor R. Ia -<5; . 'Vpialned 

that whatever A-olce t) - women of 
Oregon might have in ti e government 
of the commonwealth, the constitution 
and canons of the Episcopal church 
plainly were ant? gonlstlc to according 
to them representation at this time, 
and It was beyond the province of the 
Oregon diocese to grant the demand. 

A resolution w.is adopted memorial- 
izing the general convention to change 
the name of the church by striking out 
the word "Protestant." 

JAPS wilFspend 

$600,000 AT EXPO. 

Toklo, May 22. — The committee of 
the Japanese parliament today made a 
favorable report on the proposed ap- 
propriation of $600,000 for the repre- 
seiitatlon of Japan at the Panama-Pa- 
cific exhibition to be held at San Fran- 
cisco in 1915. 




CZAR NICHOLAS II, 
Of Russia. 



GEORGE V, 
Of England. 



BERLIN BECOMES RENDEZVOUS 
OF ROYALTY FOR WEDDING 



MISS HANNA TO WED. 

Fargo, N. D., May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Governor Hannas 
daughter, Miss Jean Hanna, will be 
married at 8 p. m. June 11 to Edwin 
Clapp of this city. The ceremony will 
be performed at the governor's home 
In this city and will be followed by a 
reception. The young people will 
leave later for an Eastern trip. The 
bridegroom is a University of Minne- 
sota graduate has been with the First 
National Bank of this city for some 
years and is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
I P. Clapp, pioneer residents of Fargo. 



UNCLE SAM: "THE SOONER YOU STOP THIS, THE BETTER FOR 

ALL CONCERNED." 




Czar, George V. and Kaiser 

and Scores of Lesser 

Nobles Present. 



Emperor William Sprints to 
Meet Aunt— Train Ar- 
rives First. 



Berlin, ^fay 22.— The gathering of 
three emperors— those of Germany, 
Russia and the British dominions— for 
the wedding on Saturday of Princess 
Victoria I.uise and Prince Ernest Au- 
gu.st of Cumberland, has made the 
German capital the center of Euro- 
pean interest. 

Beside the three great rulers, the 
only daughter of Emperor William Is 
to be surrounded at her marriage by 
such a gathering of princes and prin- 
cesses as rarely has been brought to- 
gether. Berlin has made elaborate 
preparations for the occasion. The 
city is gay with bunting, tlie peopl.» 
are in holiday humor and the streets 
swarm with brilliantly uniformed 
soldiery. 

Great Precautions For Safety. 

Extensive precautions have been 
taken for tiie safely of royal person- 
ages, the Prussian police being as- 
sisted by large bodies of Russian and 
British detectives, while the soldiers 
at the stations and lining the routes 



(Continued on page 6, tliird column.) 

HERO OF PACIFIC BOAT 
ADVENTURE MISSING 

Capt. Frank Wilson Has 

Disappeared From San 

Francisco Home. 

San Francisco, Cal.. May 22.— Capt. 
Frank Wilson, who was formerly in 
command of the Alaska-Pacific pas- 
senger liner Buckman. has been miss- 
ing for more than three months. He 
left his liomc here on Feb. 1. Three 
days later he was seen in Los Angeles, 
but no trace of him has been found 
since. 

Wilson was the hero of the pirate 
episode on the Buckman in 1910, when 
two robbers attempted to seize gold 
treasure when the vessel was off the 
coast of Oregon. After Capt. Wood 
had been shut, Wilson, then mate, 
overpowered them. 

I THE DAY IIKONGRESS | 

% SENATE. * 

^ In seKKlon at 2 p. m. • ^ 

Ai*<Iun ifu Kern AVent VIrKinia * 

Rtrlke inventlKnttun reMuIiilion dr- £ 

ferred until Monday. jl 



Martial Law Still Prevails 

in the Kanawha 

District. 



Governor Hatfield Says 

System Will Continue 

for Present. 



Twelve Men Arrested By 

Troops Are Given Their 

Freedom. 



Charleston, W. Va., May 22.— Dis- 
putes in the West Virginia coal fields 
took a new angle last night when 
1,000 miners employed in the New 
River coal field, with their families, 
left their homes and sought the pro- 
tection of the United Mine Workers of 
America. It Is said that all of them 
intend to live in tents. 

The action of the New River field 
miners in beginning a strike is said 
to have complicated a situation that 
is already mixfd and serious. 

The coal strike originating in the 
Kanawha coal field has been of long 
duration. Thrice martial law has been 
proclaimed and is still in effect, al- 
though but twenty soldiers are in that 
field. 

Under Martial Law. 

All three orders for martial law 
were issued by Former Governor Will- 
iam Glasscock since the beginning of 
the mine trouble April, 1912. Governor 
H. D. Hatfield, who succeeded Gov- 
ernor Glasscock March 4, last, has 
announced that troops are to remain 

(Continued on page 6, second column.) 

REPUBLiCANSlEET 
FOR CONFERENCE 



Progressive Wing of Party 

Will Discuss Work in 

State. 

Minneapolis. Minn., May 22. — <'.'5pe- 
clal to The Herald.) — Members of the 
Minnesota Progressive Republican 
league from all parts of the state, as 
well as men high in the councils of the 
party from other states, are here to 

attend a conference of the league to be 
held this afternoon. Among tiie visit- 
ors are Representative I. L. Lenroot of 
Superior, Wis., and Senator Gronna of 
North Dakota. The conference will 
begin at 4 o'clock this afternoon. 

According to President George Lof- 
tus the principal work of the meeting 
will be tnat or appointing committees 
and discuFsing plans for another meet- 
ing in the near future. Several ad- 
dresses will be made, and reports 
heard of conditions of the party in 
various parts of the state. 

Following the conference a banquet 
will be held at Elks club in honor of 
James Manalian, congresrman-at-iarge 
from Minnesota. At the dinner ad- 
dresses win be made by Representa- 
tives Lenroot, Manahan and Sydney 
Anderson of the First Minnesota dis- 
trict. 



QUIZ BREEN 
ONCE_ MORE 

Undertaker Cross-Exam- 
ined in the Trial of Will- 
iam Wood. 



HOI SB. 4 

^ Not |u Kea»lon; meeta at noon « 
4 Friday. ^ 



Denies Reported Talk With 
Atteaux About Manu- 
facturer. 



Boston, Mass.. May 22. — John J. 
Breen. the undertaker who has con- 
fessed that he distributed dynamite at 
I^awrence during the textile strike of 
1912, was ready to continue his testi- 
mony under cross-examination when 
the trial of President William M. Wood 
of the American Woolen company; 
Fred Atteaux and Dennis J. Collins, 
charged with conspiracy to "plant" 
the explosive was resumed bifore 
Judge John C. Crosby in the superior 
court today. 

Breen's testimony today was awaited 
with great interest by the crowd tliat 
filled the couitroom, principally be- 
cause of his declaration Just before ad- 
journment yesterday that he refused 
several months ago to accept an offer 
of $7,000 made by the attorney con- 
ducting the cross-examination. Daniel 
H. Coakley. senior counsel for -Mr. At- 
teaux. 

^ued By Several. 

Breen said that he had been engaged 
bv .\tteaux to plant th<- dynamite, and 
that later he had been sued by a num- 
ber of persons who were arrested when 
the explosive was found on their 
premises. He had sought financial as- 
sistance from Atteaux to settle the 
cases, he said, but because of the con- 

(Continued on page 6, fourth column.> 



^¥^ 




aiv 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 22, 1913. 



NEGROES DEMAND LIFE 
OF NEGRO MURDERER OF 
HIS WIFE AND CHILD 



Five Hundred Maddened Col- 
ored Men Surround 
Lockup. 

Kansas City Police Finally 

Get Prisoner Out of 

the Way. 

Kansas City, Mo., May 22— Five 
hundred negro. 3 surrounded a police 
Station in the negro quarters today, 
howlingr for the death of Wesley liob- 
Inson. one of their race, who last night 
conft-ased, the p>lice say, to slaying 
Ms ulfe and dauifhter with a hatchet 
last Saturdav ni^'ht. After a detet- 
mlnid stand by the police, the negro 
-was taken thr.>uijh the inub to a motor 
car and carried to the police head- 
QUiirters. 

Th'' negroes, armed with clubs, as- 
sailed tile police station shortly before 
11 o'clock. One of their 
Bent in as an emissary to 
Pwohinson be turned over 
thtin to "deal witli.'* 

A squad of police was Immeaiately 
sent from police headquarters. When 
they arrived the messenger had al- 
ready been thrown into the street and 
the patrolmen regularly stationed at 
the precinct of floe had, with drawn re- 
volvers, >i.>w.nl thf mob 

Criiur "ReveaJed By nream." 

Jennie lliU, a r.cgrc^s w;io:n Robin- 



number was 
demand that 
to them for 



The 
without 



son is said to have Implicated In hia 
confession was locked up in the same 
police station. Her screams could be 
heard above the mob's cry. ^ ^, 

The di.smembered body of Robinson 3 
wife was found in an outbuilding at 
Ills home, by other negroes. The arms 
and legs had been cut from the tor.so 
The search for the body came aftei 
Jonnle Hill had told of '*f/>ng the di^>- 
membered body of Mrs. Robinson In a 

'^fu)'binson was arrested last "Ight In 
Lee's Summit, Mo. The police say that 
in his confes.slon he referred to J^n"»e 
HIU a.s his affinity an'* ^^^'^.^^ed to her 
a part In the crime. He said the body 
of his 11-year-old daughter had been 
thrown into a pond near his home 
police dragged the pond today 
result. ^ 

IT CAMETOO LATE. 

Fargo Pauper Buried Day News 
Comes of $20,000 Inheritance. 

Fargo, N. D.. May 22.— Just as the 
funeral services of Edward H. Reedal, 
who died at the county poorhouse Mon- 
day was concluded and the grave in 
the' potter's field was being rounded 
UD yesttrdav, information was received 
tlmt an estate in Norway had been 
settled and Reedal had been awarded 
I'O Oi)0 as his share. Reedal was a 
pauper and had been buried at the ex- 
pense of the county. He had been a 
resident of Fargo for thirty years, 
conducting. In the earlier period, a 
harness business. He met reverses 
and becoming too feeble to work, was 
sent to the poor farm a few years ago. 
He had long anticipated the legacy 
that came too late to be of material 
use to him. 



/> 



WEATHER — Fair weather tonight and 
day; moderate northerly winds. 



NEW BROADWAY 



A limited display of beautiful and 
absolutely new creations shown atthe 
same time by this store and the best 
shops on Broadway and Fifth A venue. 

ALWAYS 





To morrow a n d Saturday 
—Panel Fulham Cravats. 

SEE OUR ENTRANCE WINDOW 




DULUTH TO CLASP HANDS 
WITH NORTH DAKOTA TOWNS 



Zenith City Business Men to 
Spend Week in Flicker- 
tail State. 



Will 



Travel 2,351 
and Visit 148 
Towns. 



Miles 



On -Sunday evening, June 1. at 6:15, 
nearly 100 Duluth business men, ac- 
companied by the Third Regiment band, 
will leave for North Dakota to spend 
six days making Duluth better known 
and appreciatfd in the Flickertall 
state. They will travel 2,351 miles, 
visit 148 towns and return to Duluth 
Sunday morning, June 8, at 8:35. 

The trade extension committee of the 
Commercial club now has the signa- 
tures of a sufficient number of busi- 
ness men to make the trip financially 
possible and a success In the numerical 
strength of the party. The committee 
is now busy making the final arrange- 
ments. Caps, penants and badges will 
be furnished the travelers, a liberal 
amount of literature will be arranged 
for distribution, and the boosting of 
former trips will be surpassed in spec- 
tacular features and Intensity. 

The territory to be covered lies along 
the main line of the Great Northern 
from Grand Forks to Mlnot and on all 
lines running north from the main line. 
From Mlnot the return to Duluth will 
be made via Fargo over the Fargo- 
Surrey cut-off, a new territory recent- 
ly opened and made available as Duluth 
trade territory. 

Fifth Trade ExcurNlon. 

The trade excursion is the fifth un- 
dertaken by the Commercial club, two 
having been held in 1911 and two in 
1912. Each of the former trips re- 
quired only three days, but on account 
of the extent of the territory to be 
covered this year, six days will be 
given and the boosters will require a 
great store of energy to maintain tlie 
pace through the six days. 

Duluth Is the natural gateway to 
North Dakota. The city has gained a 
firm financial footing in the state, and 
has the friendship of the people. The 
business men of Duluth will go out to 
make a friendly call on the towns along 
the route and will also take the oppor- 
tunity of learning something of the 
commercial and industrial progress of 
the towns visited. 

On account of the larg-e number of 
towns to be visited, the stops will 
necessarily be short, and the travelers 



RHEUMATIO SUFFERERS 

SHOULD USE 



The 
New 
Fenway 
Collar 
Is Here. 



OAK HALL BLDO. 



^ 




SAMPLE <'S-DROPS" FREE ON REQUEST 

Swanson Rheumatic Cure COm 

166-168 XV. LalM St.. CHiCACO 



-' -'^ 




/ 




Trout Fishing Season 

has been open now for some time, 
and the only way to get them is to 
be on hand with the rising sun. 
You'll have to sleep on the bank of 
the stream or some one will beat 
you to It. The Folding, Water- 
proof and Mosquito-proof Tent Cot 
sliown above is what you need. 

It folds up in a compact itttle 
bundle, built strong, but light. Can 
be set up in a minute. 

It will accommodate the smallest 
or the largest man. 

It stands 18 Inches above the 
ground and weighs but 20 pounds. 

Come In and see It. Just the 
thing for persons required to sleep 

outdoors for their health. 



For the Launch 
or Canoe 




Tables, Easy 

Chairs and 

Cots That Fold 



The Old Hickory 

Rustic 
/[rbors, 

Play- 
Houses, 

Bridges, 

Fences, 

Chairs, 





BF SI lit: TO SFE thf:si.. 

Just the thing for your porch or lawn. 



Rockers, Settees, 
and Swings 

The finest showing ever 
made in Duluth. 

Hammocks of All 
Kinds 

With or without Atands 
—all prices. 



Settee 

Like Cut, Easily Worth $1.50—. 
Special at — 

only—S^c 

Our Second Floor Porch Rug Bargains are many. Furnish your Sun Parlor or Porch in 
Old Hickory, Natural, Brown or Silver Gray Maple or Baronial Brown or Green Fiber Rush, 
and you will find Rugs and Porch Shades to harmonize. 




Porch Shades 
Woodweb 

All widths and colors at prices 
that we know will sell them. 



SEE VS 
FIRST 



coMFLETE mosEnnnsiim 




A& 



DULUTH, MiNNESOTA 




YOUR CREDIT 
IS GOOD 



We have always made a special effort to have the finest showing of summer furniture in the city. 



J 



will depart from , a former rule by 
travelluff at night. Th i Monday night 
stop win be made at Grand Forks, and 
the train will leave tl ere at 11:30 p. 
m. and travel to JMannih, a four-hour 
trip. The second ipight, a trip will be 
made from Karles to Hansboro, five 
hours. Theru wilt} be r o traveling the 
third night, tjie t^ain lying at Dun- 
seith. The fourth night vvill be spent 
at Maxbass and the fifth night at 
Miiiot. The final night will be occupied 
Willi the run in from Fargo to Duluth. 

The detailed itinerary for the trip 
follows: 

Leave Duluth 6:15 p. m. Sunday, 
June 1. 

Mondnri June 2. 

Stop 

North Dakota. Arrive Min. Leave, 
Grand Forks.. 3:00 a.ii. .. 3:00 a.m. 

Neche 6:00 a.m. 90 7:30 a.m. 

Bathgate 7:45a.iii. 10 7:55a.m. 

Hamilton 8:07 a.m. 10 8:17 a.m. 

Glasston 8:19 a.ta. 5 8:24 a.m. 

St. Thomas 8:39 a.m. 16 8:44 a.m. 

New Auburn... 8:59a.m. B 9:04a.m. 

Grafton 9:19 a.m. 15 9:34 a.m. 

Nash 9:46a.m. 5 9:51a.m. 

HOople 10:06 a.m. 10 10:16 a.m. 

Crystal 10:28 a.m. 10 10:38 a.m. 

Hensel 10:53 a.m. 6 10:58 a.m. 

Cavalier 11:13a.m. 15 11:28a.m. 

Backoo 11:38a.m. 5 11:43a.m. 

Leyden 11:55 a.m. 10 12:05 p.m. 

Walhalla 12:15p.m. 30 12:45p.m. 

Minto 2:15 p.m. 10 2:25 p.m. 

Ardock 2:40 p.m. 5 2:45 p.m. 

Manvel 3:14-^.10. 5 3:19 p.m. 

Grand Forks... 3:50 i:v'ing 11:30 p.m. 
Tuenday, June 3. 

Hannah 3:30 a.ia. 240 7:30 a.m. 

Wales 7:45 a.m. 5 7:50 a.m. 

Dresden 8:05 a.m. 5 8:10 a.m. 

Langdon 8:25 a.m. 30 8:55 a.m. 

Kasley 9:07 a.m. 5 9:12 a.m. 

Osnabrock 9:24 a.m. 10 9:34 a.m. 

Milton 9:46 a.m. 15 10:01a.m. 

Union 10:13 a.ia. 10 10:23 a.m. 

Kdinburg 10:35 a.m. 15 10:60 a.m. 

Park River 11:10a.m. 30 11:40a.m. 

Pisek 11:54a.m. 10 12:04p.m. 

{^onway 12:14p.m. 10 12:24p.m. 

Flushing 12:29 p.m. 5 12:34 p.m. 

Inkster 12:40 p.m. 15l2:55p.m. 

Orr 1:03 p.m. 10 1:13 p.m. 

McCanna 1:28 p.m. 10 1:38 p.m. 

Larlmore 1:53 p.m. 30 2:23 p.m. 

Niagara 2:48 p.m. 6 2:53 p.m. 

Petersburg 3:05 p.m. 10 3:15 p.m. 

Michigan 3:27 p.m. 15 3:42 p.m. 

Mape.s 3:52 p.m. 5 3:57 p.m. 

Lakota 4:07 p.m. 15 4:22 p.m. 

Brockett 4:45 p.m. 10 4:55 p.m. 

Lawton 5:10 p.m. 10 5:20 p.m. 

Stover 5:28 p.m. 5 5:33 p.m. 

Edmoro 5:41p.m. 10 5:51p.m. 

Derrick «: 6:06 p.m. 5 6:11p.m. 

Hampden 6:23 p.m. 10 6:33 p.m. 

Weaver 6:43 p.m. 5 6:48 p.m. 

Munich 7;05p.m. IB 7:2ap.m. 

Clyde 7:35 p.m. 5 7:40 p.m. 

Calvin 7:53 p.m. 10 8:02 i).m. 

Sarles 8:17 p.m. 30 8:47 p.m. 

LAkota 11:00 p.m. .. 11:00 p.m. 

Devils Lake... 11:40 p.m. .. 11:40 p.m. 

Hansboro 1:40 Night. 7:00 a.m. 

AVednenday. June 4. 

Ellsberry 7:15 a.m. 5 7:20 a.m. 

Rock Lake..'.. 7:32a.m. 10 7:42a.m. 

('rocus 6:00 a.m. 5 8:05 a.m. 

Olmstead 8:17 a.m. B 8:22 a.m. 

Newville 8:37 a.m. 5 8:42 a.m. 

Starkweather . 9:00 a.m. 10 9:10 a.m. 

Garske 9:25a.m. 5 9:30a.m. 

Webster 9:40 a.m. 10 9:50 a.m. 

Sweetwater ...10:00 a.m. 10 10:10 a.m. 

Devils Lake 10:25 a.m. 60 11:25 a.m. 

Grand Harbor . 11 :40 a.ra. 5 ll:45a,m. 

Penn 11:57a.m. 5 12:02p.m. 

Church's Ferry 12:12 p.m. 10 12:22 p.m. 

Maza l2:37p.m. 5 12:42p.m. 

Cando 12:57 p.ra. 30 1:23 p.m. 

Considlne 1:38 p.m. 5 1.43 p.m. 

Jarvis 1:48 p.m. 5 1-53 p.m. 

Bisbee 1:58 p.m. 10 2:08 p.m. 

p,,.nvnt 2:13p.m. 5 2:18p.m. 

IVrth 2:26p.m. 10 2:36p.m. 

Gronna 2:48 p.m. 5 2:53 p.m. 

Rolla 3:05 p.ni. 15 3:20 p.m. 

St. John 3:3«p.m. 30 4:06p.m. 

Church's Ferry 6^06 p.m. .. 6:06 p.m. 

York 'Sr^lp.rn. .. 6:41p.m. 

Dunseth *:80 Night. 7:00 a.m. 

Thursday, June 5. 

Thorne 7:1.') a. ra. 6 7:20 a.m. 

Rolette 7:35a.m. 10 7:45 a.m. 

Barley 7:50 a.m. S 7:55 a.m. 

Hansen 8:03 a.ra. 5 8:08 a.m. 

Wolford 8:23 a.m. 10 8:33 a.m. 

Hong 8:48 a.m. 5 8:53 a.m. 

York 9:08 a.m. 15 9:23 a.m. 

Knox 9-85 a.m. 10 9:45 a.m. 

Pleasant Lake. 9:57 a.m. 5 10:02 a.m. 

Fero lo:10a.m. 5 10:lo a.m. 

Rugby 10:25 a.m. 30 10:55 a.m. 

Barton 11:20 a.m. 5 11:25 a.m. 

Willow City... 11:40 a.m. 20 12:00 m. 

Omenee 12:15p.m. 10 12:25p.m. 

Bottineau ....12:53 p.m. 30 1:23 p.m. 

Carbury 1:38 p.m. 5 1:43 p.m. 

Landa 2:13 p.m. 10 2:23 p.m. 

We3thope 2:35 p.m. 20 2:a5 p.m. 

Kuroke 3:05 p.m. 5 3:10p.m. 

Antler 3:25 p.m. 30 3:55 p.m. 

Rugby 6:16 p.m. .. 6:15 p.m. 

Towner 6:50 p.m .. 6:50 p.m. 

Maxbass 8:15 Night. ^ :00 a.m. 

Friday, June 6. 

Newburg 7:20 a.m. 5 7:25 a.m 

Upham 7:5.0a.Tn. 5 .:5oa.m. 

Bantry 3:10 a.m. 5 8:15 a.m. 

Towner 8:40 a.m. 30 9:10 a.m. 

Denbigh 9:25 a.m. 5 9:30a.m. 

Ri7.a ...9:42a.m. 5 9:4<a.m. 

Granville 9:59 a.m. 20 10:19 a.m. 

Deering 10:44 a.m. 10 10:54 a.m. 

Glenburn ....11:14 a.m. 10 11:24a.m. 

Forfar 11:36a.m. 5 11:41a.m. 

Lansford 11:51a.m. 10 12:01a.m. 

Truro 12:13 p.m. 5 12:18 p.m. 

Mohall 12:28p.m. 15 12:43p.m. 

Sherwood 1:13 p.m. 30 1:43 p.m. 

Granville 3:30 p.m. .. 3:30 p.m. 

Norwich 3:45 p.m. 10 3:55 p.m. 

Surrev 4:10 p.m. 10 4:20 p.m 

Mlnot 4:35 Sight. 7:00 a.m. 

Saturday. Jwine 8. 

Falsen 8:00 a.m. 5 8:05a.m. 

Karlsruh« .... 8:15a.m. 5 f-?^*"^ 

Rangely 8:35 a.m. 6 8:40 a.m. 

Su?hrle :..... 8:52a.m. 10 9.02a.m. 

Norfolk ^i?*'"- I V.ll^'^- 

Avlmer 9:27a.m. 5 9:82a.m. 

Clifton 9:47 a.m. 5 9:52 a.m. 

s'lz 10:08a.m. ■6 10:13 a.m. 

Wellsburg ....10:28 a.m. B 10:33 a.m. 

Helnsdal ...10:45 a.m. 5 10:55 a.m. 

Viking 11:07a.m. 5 11:12a.m. 

Breme^n 11:24 a.m. 6 11:29 a.m. 

Munster 11:41a.m. 6 11:46 a.m. 

New Rockford. 12:01 p.m. 45 12:46 p.m. 

Brantford .... 1:06 p.m. 5 1:11 Pm. 

Grave City .... 1:26 p.m. 5 1:81 p.m. 

Tuanlta 1:43 p.m. 5 lt48 p.m. 

GPinfield ...2:03 p.m. 5 2:08 p.m. 

button .::.:. 2:23 p.m. 5 2:28 p.m. 

Hannaford 2:53 p.m. 20 3:13 p.m. 

Luverne 3:28p.m. 5 8:33 p.m. 

Plllsbury ^^|P'"- f Unl^-^: 

Prosner 4:55 p.m. 5 5:00 p.m. 

fI^Io . ••• 5:25 EVlng 12:00 

St Cloud, Minn 4:30a.m. .. 4:35 a.m. 

13uluth 8:35 Sunday morning. 

PUT orfRiMr" 

FOR ROBBERY 



Prisoner Who Escaped 

From Police Facing a 

Jury. 

Paul Morris, a handcuffed prisoner 
who e.scaped from the police last April 
making a clean get-fi-way and who 
was rearrested at Peoria, 111., and held 
for the sheriff's office of this county, 
was brought to trial In district court 
before Judge Cant and a Jury thl» 
morning on a charge of grand larceny, 
first degree. 

Morris, the state opecta to i)rove, 
.stole $50 froii Nlcola Randanchich on 
April 22 last. He has pleaded not guilty 
to the chargei and is being defended by 
Attorney H. !e. Frybeiger. Mason M. 
Forbes, first as.slstant -ounty attorney, 
is appearing , for the state. 

While In court. Morns Is belnu: ni 
tended by a- deputy fherlff, who has 
Instructions to carefully watch that 
the prisoner does not make a breaK 
for liberty. 



STATE CALLS 
ENGELS' WIFE 



Woman Tells Story. Favor- 
able to Her Husband, 
Who Is on Trial. 



Court Trying to Determine 

Who Blinded Delaus 

Rensaa. 



Josle EngelS; former proprietor of 
the North Star lodging house, over the 
Egdahl saloon at 509 West Michigan 
street, was called as a witness by the 
state in the prosecution of her hus- 
band, Matthew Engels, charged with 
having brutally assaulted Delaus Ren- 
saa on the evening of Sept. 3, 1912. 
Rensaa had his eye kicked out while 
in the corridor between the saloon 
and the rooming iiouse. Two men are 
under Indictment for participating in 
the fracas. One Is Engels, who is on 
trial today, and the other is James 
Fitzglbbons, who is accused of second 
degree assault. The state expects to 
prove that Rensaa was set upon twice. 

Mrs. Engels, although called as a 
witness by the state, testified that 
Rensaa took the aggressive and court- 
ed trouble. She claimed that he came 
to the door of the sitting room in 
whicli she and lier husband were sit- 
ting with another man and woman, and 
that when her liusband, Engels, asked 
him what he wanted around there, he 
was informed tliat it was none of his 

"d • bu-siness," whereupon Engels 

jumped up and started for the door, 
outside a squabble ensued. Mrs. Ren- 
gels testified that she saw Rensaa 
strike her hu.sband, but admitted that 
blows were exchanged and that in the 
end Rensaa was lying on tlie floor 
crying for help. Slie said that there 
was blood on his face and testified 
that she picked him up and helped 
him to one of the rooms, where she 
washed the blood from his face. 
Fa.HtenBi Illume on Fitzglbbons. 

Mrs. Engel.s also testitied that she 
attempted to get someone to take him 
from the place and that she asked 
Fitzglbbons to take him out. He re- 
fused to do it, she claimed. Later, she 
testified. Fitzglbbons started to figiit 
with Rensaa. According to her testi- 
mony, It was Fitzglbbons and not her 
liusband, Matt Engels, who kicked 
Rensaa blind. 

Mrs. Engels admitted on the witness 
stand that she only claimed a common 
law marriage with Engels. She staled 
that she had lived with him for about 
three years and had been known as 
Mrs. Engels during that time. Around 
the rooming house, she was better 
known as "Josle." 

Saw Start of Fight. 

Mrs. Ida Tiensun admitted that .she 
came over from Superior with Bristol 
late in the afternoon of that day. Asked 
why she went to the lodging house, 
.^he stated that Bristol had brought her 
there so that he could visit with her. 

Bristol, who was a witness in the 
damage suit against Gust Egdahl, 
brought by Mrs. Rensaa this year, stat- 
ed that at that time that he was a 
painter. He claimed that he painted 
pictures and sold them to lumberjacks 
in the saloons. 

On the witness stand today, both 
TJrlstol and Mrs. Tiensun stated that 
they witnessed the start of the fight 
between Engels and Rensaa. Mr.s. 
Tiensun declared that the first blow 
had been struck by Engels. She said 
that she left the place immediately 
after the fight started. 

Rensaa was on the stand all of yes- 






m 

^^ Correct Dress for Women ^i^j^ and GirU" 

ARE FEATURING FOR 
TOMORROW 

Unusual Values in 
House Dresses 

of Striped Ginghams and Plain Chambrays, 
embroidery trimmed collars and cuffs, $3.75. 

Waist Specials 

New arrivals in fine Batiste Waists, with ruffle 
front and Dutch collars, trimmed in contrast- 
ing colors, at $1.00^ regular values $1.75. 

—A/so— 

Lingerie and Voile Waists, embroidery and lace trim 
styles in all sizes at $1.00. Regular values $1.75 to $3.00. 

You will find a vast difference in these values com- 
pared to the kind advertised at the same prices in other 

stores. 

. Slip-on Raincoats 

One dozen Slip-on Raincoats, in tan and gray, at 
$1.75. Regular values $2.75. 

Petticoats 

Important sale of Messaline and Taffeta Petticoats 
in a variety of styles and colors at $1.95. Regularly $2.95. 



terday afternoon and most of the morn- 
ing. This morning he testified that 
two weeks prior to the alleged assault, 
that he had an altercation with Engels 
in which the latter had called him a 
string of vile names. This occurred, 
he claims, in the Egdahl saloon, which 
connects with the lodging house. 



BAPTISTS TO HEAR 
OF MISSION FUNDS 



Condition of Church Col- 
leges Also Is Considered 
at Detroit. 

Detroit, Micii., May 22. — The princi- 
pal business before the Northern Bap- 



tist convention today was the report of 
the finance committee as to the prog- 
ress of the "$3,000,000 campaign." This 
movement was Instituted last year to 
double the approximate amounts spent 
by the Baptist church of the Northern 
states in home and foreign mission 
work. 

Sessions devoted to the American 

Baptist Foreign Missionary society and 
the American Baptist Publication so- 
ciety were scheduled for later In the 
day. 

One of the important subjects to be 
considered by the convention is the 
condition of a number of Baptist col- 
leges throughout the country. These 
colleges are of the partially endowed 
or unendowed class and they cannot 
be assisted by the ^49,000,000 Rocke- 
feller foundation because they have 
not reached the required standard. 
About 2,000 delegates are attending 
the convention. 



CLEAN HOUSE WITH A VACUUM CLEANER 



I*:: 



sm 



inimiiiim 



i^h 



iiii 
'ill 



^tl 



=f=?n;s 



— ^-l 






msy^ 



THE THURMAN 

Thurman. Let us show you this cleaner. Price 



Save the back-breaking drudgery of yearly 
housecleaning the old way. The new and 

dustless method of housecleaning is with a 
Vacuum cleaner. We recommend the Thur- 
man Electric cleaner as being the best of its 
kind, and doing many more things than 
done by others. Just think of the many 
things that can be cleaned the new, dustless 
way. Cleaning carpets and rugs without 
being taken up; cleaning hardwood 
floors ; cleaning stair carpets, stair edges, 
draperies, portieres, tapestries, walls; 
cleaning upholstering and cushions, 
tuft button cleaning, women's millinery 
_ and wearables; as a hair-dryer, massage 
treatments, facial massage, also for clean- 
ing radiators and registers, and the auto or car- 
riage. Fourteen tools, each for^a different and 
important use, come with the 




^tII 



IMI^ DTMT ^^^^^ machine out, if you do not wish to buy one now. 

MIP iCtnl I Connect on any light fixture; costs less to run than an 

■ ■■■ ■ electric iron. Phone our housefurnishing department. 



THE RICHMOND CLEANER 

A most wonderful little machine ; cleans the home from one 
end to the other; if you can't afford a powerful Thurman 
cleaner, surely a Richmond, the best low-priced machine on 
the market, will fill the bill. Cleans carpets, rugs, walls, 
floors, furniture and hundreds of other household pieces. 
Price — 



(With attachments, $65.00.) 
YOURS FOR A DUSTLESS HOME! 






•V 



-y^ 



THE RICHMOND 



TO THE PROSPECTIVE BUYER. 
A LiniE TALK ON TRUNKS. 

If vou feel inclined to look over the middleman's 
stock of Trunks, let us suggest a few pointers. 

When the binding is all wrinkled up, or the inside linin.-]! 
cracked, with a general shopworn appearance, that indicates, as 
a rule, cheap or boy labor. These trunks cannot wear. 

Oy^ Fi^GTilRY C^i SdPFPLY YOUI 

with clean, well made Trunks better and for less money thanj 

the middleman can offer you. 

SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS FOR BALANCE OF WEEK 




Extra heavy 
bound Trunk (like above 
cut). This comes in two grades, 36-inch. 
$8.75 and 



$■7-25 



r 




I 38-inch Steamer Trunk 
^ and a 24'inch Matting 
i Case, Special 



$6.50 





34x2 1x23 Sheet 
Steel Covered— Long straps, brassed corners. 
Special 





Extra 
deep; 
leatlier 
case; just 
like cut — 

$C.25 



5 



6-ineh 
ease, like 
cut — 

$3.75 



Splendid 

fllXT 

cawes ; 
6 rivets In 
eaeh 
corner — 
special — 

10.75 



3 




HAND SEWED 




18-inch 
Black or 
Brown Cow- 
hide Bags, 
leather 
lined, special 




SATURDAY EVENING SPECIAL, 6 to 10 p. m. 

24-inch Matting Cases, with wooden frames, ac. 




SEND US YOUR MAIL ORDERS. 

NORTHERN TRUNK CO. 



EILERT BROS. 



228 WEST FIRST STREET. 




Thursday, 



THE DULUTH, hJ:RALD 



May 22, 1913. 



WEST DULVTH 

HBRALD BRANCH OFFICES i 
A. Jeniien, S30 North BTth Ave. W. J, J. Moran, 81CVi North 0«qtr«l Ave. 

Herald's Weat Dnluth reporter may be reached after 
hour of erolnfir to prose, at Calumet 178-M and Col© 247. 



BANQUET OF 
ELY ALUMNI 



Members of 1913 Class 

Will Be Guests of the 

Graduates. 



New Officers of Association 
to Be Elected at Bus- 
iness Meeting. 



The Ely School Alumni association 
will hold Its annual banquet In the 
school building- tomorrow evening. A 
F>rogram of music, recitations, read- 
ings and toasts has been prepared. 

Harold G. House, principal of the 
school, will be toastmaster. The affair 
will begin with a business session 
at which new officers and an executive 
board, with members from each class 
will be elected. 

The program will begin at 8 o'clock. 
The following program will be given: 
Address of welcome to class of 1913 
Gordon Method. President of the 
Alumni. 

Response 

Miss Mercedes Lamphere. President 
of the Graduating Class. 

Piano solo 

Miss Marie Krantz. 
Dialogue — "Her Neighbor' .s Creed".. 
Miss Zelma Moyer and Charles 
Everett. 

Piano duet 

Misses Bessie O'Brien and Helen 
Wenner. 

Address— "Class of 1913" 

Miss Johanna Strate. 

Address 

L. A. Barnes. 

Address — "Our Baseball Boys" 

Russell Method. 

Address — "Ely School" 

John Davis. 

Vocal solo 

Miss Edna McLlmans. 

Recitation — "Marketing" 

Wallace Hanklns. 

Reading 

Harry Randall. 

Piano solo 

Miss Ethel Little. 

Class song and class yell 

The members of the graduating 
class, who will be guests of the af- 
fair, are: Crescenthia Chestock, Mabel 
DahUiuist, Blanch Gerard, Anna John- 
son, May Florence Johnson, Pearl 
Jones, Marie Krantz. Mercedes Lam- 
phere Margaret McNeils, Evelyn Mar- 
tin, Jennie Mattson, Myrtle Murray, 
Marie Olson, Mildred Wilson, Florence 
Heffner, Edna McLlmans, Ada Shanks, 
Myrtle Jacobson, Arthur Anderson, 
Samuel Brassard, Reeve Hankins, Carl 
John.^on, Rudolph Krantz, Henry Llnd- 
skog, Russell Method, John Morrison, 
Albert Nyman, James Paradise, Walter 
Sandstrom and Russell Warner. 

MOTHE RSMVIE ETING. 

Picture of Miss Frances Willard Will 
Be Presented. 

The presentation of the picture of 
Miss Frances Willard, late head of the 
national organization of the Women's 

Christian Temperance union, will fea- 
ture the program at the mothers' 
meeting to be held tomorrow after- 
noon at the Jerome Merritt school. 
Fortieth avenue west and Sixth street. 
Mrs, Alfred Jaques will give the prin- 
cipal address incidental to the hang- 
ing up of the picture. 

A program is also planned for the 
meeting. Mrs. David Adams will give 
vocal .selections and addresses will be 
given by members of the club. 

DISTRICT MEETING 

O FTHE W.C.T.U. 

The annual district meeting of the 
Women's Christian Temperance union 
win be held Tuesday afternoon at the 
Grace Methodist church, Twenty-sec- 
ond avenue west and Third street. 
Representatives from the three unions 
in Duluth and from range organiza- 
tions will attend. 

The principal business session will 
commence at 1:30 o'clock. Mrs. Jo- 
seph Cochran, district president, will 
preside. At 5:30 o'clock a basket lunch 
will be served and at 7:30 o'clock a 
program of speeches and music will 
be given. The program will probably 
be ready to be announced on Monday. 



"A TIZ Bath, M y Boy" 

Can't Be Beat for Corns, Bunions 
and Aching Feet. 



Send for Free Trial Package T<Klay. 



"Sural I U«e TIZ 
Every Time for 
Any Foot Trouble." 




When your feet are i*o tired they 
feel like stumps, when they ache so 
that they hurt way up to your heart, 
when you shamble your feet along and 
It seems as though all the mLsery you 
over had has .settled in your feet, look 
at the happy TIZ man in the picture. 

You can be happy-footed just the 
.same. This man used TIZ, and now 
he has no more tender, raw, chafed, 
blistered, swollen, tired, smelly feet, 
corns, callouses or bunions. 

As soon as you put your feet In a 
TIZ bath, you feel the happiness soak- 
ing In. 

Nothing else but TIZ can give you 
this happy foot feeling. Don't accept 
any .substitutes. Demand TIZ. 

Mr. A. Coon, 123 W. 112 St., New 
York, says, "I have tried everything 
that could be bought, and .«pent hun- 
dreds of dollars for advice and treat- 
ment, but I Anally found relief In a 
25-cent box of TIZ." 

TIZ, 25 cents a box, sold at all drug 
stores, department and general stores 
or it will be sent you direct if you 
wish. Money back If TIZ doesn't do 
all we say. Write today to Walter 
Luther Dodge & Co., Chicago, 111., for 
free trial package of TIZ and enjoy 
real foot relief. 



MORE SPACIE IS 
NEEDED FOR COURT 



Judge Lanners' Quarters 

Prove Too Small With 

Growth of Business. 

Business at the \^'e8t Duluth branch 
of the municipal court is increasing so 
rapidly that arrangements will soon 
have to be made foi' som^ la»-ger place 
than the office of Judge H. W. Lan* 
ners. Yesterday this r.ourt had Un 
cases come before it, four drunks, one 
assault in the second degree, one for 
allowing cattle to -oam at large and 
three for as.sault oi a street car. 

The corridors of the Silvey block 
were crowded with spectators and 
people interested in the outcome of 
the cases. Many of the Interested 
parties were unable to get Into the 
room where the heiuiiig was held be- 
cause of its small mirc.^ 

The commlssioner:j will be asked Im- 
modiaiely to provide some other place 
which will give mo'e room. The West 
Duluth Co;iimercial clubrooms have 
been offered for this purpose and are 
said to be recomnn nded by the busi- 
ness men until such a time as the city 
is financially able to erect a special 
building for a police station and court 
rooms combined. 

# * * I* 

William Lendo, M^ho was arrested 
charged with bavin a: used a knife ef- 
fectually on Nick Houtelle and Vic- 
tor Salo on Tuesday evening was 
bound over to the grand Jury on a 
charge of assault in the second degree. 
Koutelle and Salo pleaded guilty to 
having been drunk on that night ai-d 
were fined $1 and casts. Sentence v^as 
suspended in each case. 

* * « 

Mrs. Mary Szubart was found guilty 
of letting her cow roam at large and 
was fined fl and costs amounting: to 
$5.74. 

• • • 

John Bavich, a Jialergh street sa- 
loon keeper, who wis arrested a week 
ago on a charge of disorderly conduct, 
was fined $5 and costs when he 
pleaded guilty to the charge yesterday 
afternoon. 

» * • 

Roy Drake and Roy Murnlan pleaded 
guilty to assault or a street car con- 
ductor when they appeared before the 
court. The assault took place on 
Sunday evening May 11. A similar 
charge against Lawrence Carey was 
dropped for lack cf evidence and a 
new warrant issued charging him 
with drinking beer on the car. He 
pleaded not guilty :o this charge and 
will be given a hearing this afternoon. 
Sentence on Drake and Murnlan was 
deferred until this afternoon. 



PUPILS HAVE 

$2,8<t6 IN BANK 

Irving School f'udents 

Have Acquired Habits 

of Thrift. 

Pupils of the Irving school have 
probably the largest amount of sav- 
ings to their credit of any school in 
the city. Since the leavings department 
was started in the .schools the children 
of this Institution have deposited 
$2,846.96. 

Every Thursday morning the chil- 
dren of the various rooms line up at 
the principal's office to make their de- 
posits. The amounts vary from 1 cent 
to over a dollar, indicating that the 
children are taking a great deal of 
Interest In saving for the future. 

"It is getting to be a regular habit 
with the children to save," said Prin- 
cipal S. A. Poster tils morning. "Tliey 
are spending much less for candles and 
other stuff and are depositing their 
pennies In the banlc. From the way 
some of them save they will become 
great financiers sonre of these days." 
♦ 

Birthday Parties. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Day, 308 South 
Fifty-ninth avenue west entertaintd 
at a birthday party In honor of their 
grandson, Mlnard Goolsby. The guests 
were: Ernest Quesni.-lle, Clarence Toor, 
Stanley Toor, Louis Dory, Howard Mc- 
Donald, Henry Wright, Lfslie Ander- 
son, John Callahan, ,and Edward 
French. 

Last evening Mlnard Goolsby was 
surprised by a nurr.ber of his young 
friends In honor of the anniversary. 
Games and music wasi played. The 
guests were: Misses Violet Schoonover, 
Esther Schooiiover, Esther Linderberg, 
May Jackson, Gertj- Mattx, Angellne 
Mattx, Delina Blais. Leona La Mere, 
Pauling Quesnelle, and Messrt. Ernest 
Quesnelle, Clarence T»©r, Stanley 
Toor, Clarence Dory, Leslie Anderson 
and Thomas Decharibeau. 



West Duluth Briefs. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Schlmmel of 
Cook, Minn,, are guests of relatives In 
Oneota. 

Miss Agnes Wlnn<!S8, 716 North Cen- 
tral avenue. Is spending a few days 
visiting relatives in Virginia. 

George Blechl, 4 36 North Central 
avenue, returned yenterday from a trip 
down the lakes. 

Miss Edna Ross. 714 North Fifty- 
sixth avenue west, Is visiting friends 
in Virginia this wc'^k. 

Wanted — Girl for .general housework. 
5506 West Sixth street. 

E. B. Heeter of New Castle, Pa., is a 
guest at the Hotel <^ody. 

Mrs. I. Ivcrson is at St. Luke's hos- 
pital, where she underwent an opera- 
tion for appendicitis, 

H. H. Blaokwell cf Minneapolis was 
a visitor in West Duluth this morning. 

Miss Julia Melin, 307 North Plfty- 
tlilrd avenue west, left yesterday for 
Europe, where she will spend three 
months visiting principal points of In- 
terest, j,- 

Boy wanted — To learn'the drug busl- 
ness. City drug store. 

Buy your weddlnj.: and confirmation 
gifts at Hanson's jewelry story. .'iTth 
and Grand. Ramstal bldg., Thursday. 
Watch repairing. Hurst, W. Duluth. Adv 

For Rent — New modern six-room 
house, hot witer }«»t. Inquire Scott 
ei'mpany. 315 Central avenue. 

A. W. Sluegel, general manager for 
the Island Creek Ccal Dock company, 
b'ft this morning for a short business 
trip to Eau Claire, "\ns. Tomorrow he 
will go to Mlnneapclis, where he will 
attend the funeral of P. a Elwell, 
former .superintendent of the company, 
who died Sunday. Mr. Sluegel will 
vKsIt a number of the company's of- 
ficers In the Twin Cities n-nd the south- 
ern part of the state before returning 
home. ' 



WALK 410 MILES 

TO GET A REST. 



St. Paul, Minn., M. 
The Herald.)— E. Pf 
in the city division 
and George Johnso 
postal sub-station, 
on a pleasure "hike' 
expect to cover the 
teen days. They v 
except a change of 
coat and will recel 
necessary from the. 
parcel post. 



ly 22.— (Special to 
ter.soh, mall clerk 
of the postoffice, 
n, a clerk In a 
ivlll leave' tonight 
• to Chicago. They 
410 miles In four- 
'111 carry nothing 
shoes and a raln- 
ve other supplies 
Ir homes here by 



TWO REPORT 
RORRERIES 

August Schneider Beaten, 

Robbed and Locked in 

Box Car. 



Andy Mcintosh Set Upon By 

Three Men in Nicollet 

Hotel. 



August Schneider, an ironworker, 
was robbed, beaten and locked in a 
boxcar some time last night and early 
tills morning Andy Mcintosh, a woods- 
man, was strong-armed and robbed in 
the Nicollet hotel. 

Neither victim knew how much 
money he had lost. Schneider said that 
he hud $30 or $40 when he got drunk 
\esterday afternoon and Mcintosh had 
between $8 and $12 and a -'1-jewel 
watch taken from him. 

Schneider wa.s found in the boxcar 
In the N. P. yards near the foot of 
Third avenue west about 1 o'clock this 
morning by a .special officer of the 
railroad. He heard the man beating 
on the door and yelling to be released. 
Releasing the fastening he slid back 
the door and found .Schneider inside. 
Schneider was taken to the police sta- 
tion, where he was detained over night. 
This morning he said that he had been 
drinking yesterday and the last he re- 
membered was that he had gone to the 
shipping office at the foot of Fifth 
avenue west. Of what happened after 
that hi.s mind is a blank up until the 
lime the lailroad flycop let him out of 
the boxcar. His pockets had been rifled 
and he had been roughly handled as 
evidenced by the bruises on his body 
and the finger marks on his throat. He 
hasn't the slightest idea of the Iden- 
tity of tho men who took his money 
and then pitched him Into the bo.xcar, 
locking the door on him. 

Pulled Into Room. 

Mclntosli knows more of what hap- 
pened to him. He said that as he was 
returning to his room from the lava- 
tory on an upper floor of the Nicollet 
hotel on the Bowery, a door was sud- 
denly thrown open and he was jerked 
inside. Three men grabbed him, threw 
him to the floor and went through his 
pockets, taking what money he had 
with him, some $8 or $12, and his 
watch. When he was thrown out into 
the corridor again he made his way 
downstairs and reported his loss to 
the clerk. Together they summoned 
Patrolmen Westerlund, Harllng and 
Ricketts. The trio of bluecoats went 
to the room pointed out by Mcintosh 
and found three men inside. Mcintosh 
identified them positively as the men 
who had relieved him of his wealth. 
At the police station thev gave their 
names as William Pflager. Peter Grey 
and Charles K, O'Neil. The first saia 
he Is a sailor and the other claimed to 
be marine firemen. A search of their 
clothes and the room failed to discover 
the money, Mcintosh said he had lost. 
They were not arraigned in police 
court this morning but will probably 
be brought In this afternoon. 



KIRBY PRAISED BY 
MANUFACTURERS 



Retiring President of Asso- 
ciation Is Given $10,000 
By Delegates. 

Detroit, Mich., May 22.— The National 
Association of Manufacturers concluded 
its annual convention here yesterday 
and today the delegates went to Battle 
Creek as the guests of C. W. Post. Be- 
fore the trip is concluded it is ex- 
pected that Col. George Poe of Hart- 
ford, Conn., will be elected president 
for the ensuing year. 

The following new vice presidents 
were elected: Albert E. Cox of Massa- 
chusetts, and A. J. Thorntree of Rhodt- 
Island. The new directors at large 
are W. J. Frank of Pennsylvania, E. S 
spear of Massachusetts and A J 
Farnsworth of Connecticut. 

Gave Kirby 910,000. 

John Kirby, Jr., of Dayton, Ohio, 
retiring president of the association, 
was presented with a check for $10,000 
by the delegates attending the meeting. 
Resolutions adopted stated that the 
gift was in recognition of his efflclencv 
as president and his "fearless battle 
against militant labor unionism, which 
have been as effectual as those of any 
one man In the country In establishing 
the principle of the open shop." 

Just prior to the conclusion of the 
convention, resolutions were adopted 
urging the establishment of a Federal 
department of manufactures; denounc- 
ing the principle of the closed shop: 
urging adequate precaution for all 
American industries; protesting against 
the "abridgement of the rights of 
courts of eciuity to grant injunctions 
in labor disputes;" protesting against 
all "class legislation as un-American 
and detrimental to the common good;" 
pledging loyalty to the judiciary; urg- 
ing further and more efficient enact- 
ment of workmen's compensation leg- 
islation, and approving the immediate 
enactment of all important and neces- 
sary laV>or laws. 

Many of the delegates opposed the 
policy of having Federal agents In- 
vestigate conditions in factories where 
wages may be reduced on account of 
the new tariff law, as proposed by Sec- 
retary Redfield. 



Superior 



RUSSELL FOR 

SUPE RIOR JOB. 

Washington, May 22. — President Wil- 
son today made, among others, the fol- 
lowing nominations: 

Commissioner general of immigra- 
tion, Anthony A. Caminettl of Cali- 
fornia. 

Postmasters: 

.T. F. Kelley, Aberdeen, S. D. 

Fred A. Russell, Superior, Wis. 

Opposed to Bill. 

Sujicrlor poolroom proprietors will, 
it is said, strongly oppose the proposed 
law making It a gross misdemeanor to 
allow minors In poolrooms. The meas- 
ure is said to have been Indorsed by 
the Wisconsin senate and It Is sched- 
uled to come before the legislature 
within a short time. 



Mrs. Woiford Dies. 

Mrs. :^^ary E. Woiford, for many 
years a resident of the East end, died 
last night of paralysis. She was the 
widow of T, H. Woiford, who for a 
number of years was district court re- 
porter. She Is survived by three daugh- 
ters. The funeral arrangements will 
be made today. 

♦ 

state Examinations. 

state civil service examinations will 
be held at the county courthouse on 
June 7 for three positions on the state 
railroad and tax commission. The po- 
sitions open are asalBtant Inspectors 



i lbersteln& Pond 

C-Onipany 



EstaMisted 

1870 



Extra 



cia 



1 Silk 



Fifty pieces of Striped, Checked, Monotone 
Checks, etc., consisting of Plain and Fancy Mes- 
salines, Louisines, Tafifetas and Foulards, 19 to 26 
inches wide, and values to $1.25, special, 69c yard. 



ress 



oods 



ecia 



Shepherd Checks, Stripes, Chevron Stripes and 
Fancy Weaves, blue and white, black and white, 
brown and white and mixtures, 36 to 44 inches wide 
-special, 45c yard. 



Ladies Raincoats $1.98 



L. P. GALLAGHER, 

Commercial Photographer 



MlulnSf Catnlognie, Archi- 
tectural, Vrogreum & Con- 
Btructlon. I'MnoramIe Vlewa. 



ai5 WEST FIRST STRKET, 
Dulatb, Minn. 

I'hone, MeIro«e 2.^K4. 



for the civil engineering service, elec- 
trical engineering service and mechan- 
ical englneerintr service. Applications 
for examinations are to be filed with 
the civil service commission at ilad- 
ison before June 3. 



ADDITIONAL SPORTS 



TRAVERS FAVORITE 
IN GOL F TOU RNAMENT. 

New York, May 22. — When play In 
the Metropolitan Amateur Golf cham- 
pionship tournament was resumed at 
the Fox Hills golf club, Staten Island, 
today, the course was enveloped in a 
sea fog and a light Scotch mist had 
dampened the links but not sufficiently 
to Interfere with long scoring. 

Jerome D. Travers, the national 
champion, four times winner and pres- 
ent holder of the Metropolitan cham- 
pionship was a prime favorite for this 
year's honor on account of his splen- 
did performance yesterday when he es- 
tablished a new amateur record of 73 
for the altered course, the distance of 
which Is 6,303 yards. 

Today's contests consisted of two 18- 
hole match plays which will reduce the 
championship field of thirty-two to 
eight players. The third and semi- 
final rounds will be decided tomorrow 
and the final at 36 boles on Saturday. 

STOVAL aToLOGIZES 

AND IS REI NSTATED. 

St. Louis, May 22. — George Stoval, 
suspended manager of the St. Louis 
Americans, was reinstated by Presi- 



dent Johnson of the American league 
today on condition that he write a let- 
ter of apology to Umpire Charles Fer- 
guson on whom he spat while playing 
in a game here May 3. 

_- m 

Wants Return Bout. 

San Francisco, Cal., May 22. — With 
the hope of getting a return bout with 
Gunboat Smith, Tom Jones, Jess Wll- 
lard's manager, has offered to match 
Willard with Smith for another fight, 
winner take all. In answer to this 
Smith's manager, Buckley, said: 

"If :A»u will guarantee me that our 
end will be $10,000, I will take the 
match and be ready to fight any time 
you say." 

Track Team Leaves. 

Grand Forks, N. D., May 22. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Members of the 
Universltv of North Dakota track teaun 
left last night for Huron, S. D., to 
participate in the conference field met-t 
Friday and Saturday. On the Dakota 
team are Chlttlck, Owen, Dahl, Schlos- 
ser, Zipoy. Flint and Connor. 

The university has a strong relay 
t»am and will make a strong bid for 
victory in that event. 

♦ 

Bookwalter and Bell. 

Indianapolis, Ind., May 22. — Joseph 

E. Bell, Democrat, had 6,602 votes and 

his nearest opponent. Former Mayor 

John W. Holtzman, 3,601 in the race 

for the mayoralty nomination, accord- 
ing to unofficial returns today, 

Charles A. Bookwalter, twice mayor 
of Indianapolis, won easily In his con- 
test for the Republican nomination. 

Dr. W. H. Johnson slightly Increased 
his lead over W. K. Stewart for the 
Progressive nomination. Johnson had 
1,423 votes In eighty-one precincts to 
Stewart's HHO. 



D. H.. 6-22-13. 




The Triple C Suit 
Price $19.50 

A Columbia Special for the man 
who wants to wear the best at a 
moderate price. 

We have realized for a long time that there are 
thousands of men who wish to wear the very best 
and how some who feel that their means will not per- 
mit it are easily led to fall for the luring offers of the 
unscrupulous suit man; while we know that the suits 
we have always sold at $25.00 are just a little bit bet- 
ter, — a little bit more stylish and a little better made 
— than most $25.00 suits, yet in order to fill the gap 
and cater to the wants of everybodv we have put out 
the "CCC Special" at $19.50. This suit embodies 
every point of a $25.00 garment, in fact, includes 
many of the values that we heretofore marked at 
$22.50 and $25.00. 

The great success cf our "Colombo" "$14.50 suit 
was an incentive for doing this. When we told you 
that we would give you $18.00 and $16.50 values at 
$14.50 we had an immediate response, far beyond 
our expectations. We are selling three suits at $14.50 
where formerly we sold only one at $16.50 and $18.00 
and the volume of our business is so increased that 
the aggregate of our profits remains normal. 



Duluth, 
Minn 



lITe Columbia 



Foot-Note: Walk in Hanan Shoes. 



At Third 

Avenue 

West 



•PUPPP 



«H 



mmmmmm 



ma 



wm 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 22, 1913. 



Big Reduction Sale 




— on^ 



Ladies' Suits 

Shepherd Plaid and Club Check, 
selling regularly up to $27.50 will 
sell during this sale at — 

$15.98 

Higher priced Suits selling reg- 
ularly at $29.50 to $39.50 will sell at 
this reduction sale for — 

$19.98 

These are genuine bargains in La- 
dies' Spring and Summer Suits. Do 
not fail to visit our store during the 
Reduction Sale. 



Your Credit Is Good 







Are You Looking 
for a Bank? 

Then you're the man we're look- 
in t? for. 

We want to talk with yon. 

There are a good many reasons 
why it will be to your advantage to 
open an account with us. 

The matter of safety is of course 
of first importance, which is guar- 
anteed by our ample capital, large 
surplus and conservative, though 
vigorous, management. 

\V e want your account; large or 
small, and will extend you every 
consideration and favor that your 
account will warrant. 

Three per cent interest paid on 
time deposits. 

jy orthern 
Rational fi ank 

Alworth Building. 

"Right in the Center of Business," 



CHOP HOUSES 
PRESERVED 



BANK MESSENGER 

FIGHTS ROBBERS 



Saves Money When At- 
tacked in Streets of New 
Yor1< City. 

New York, May 22. — James T. Win- 
tress, a bank mt^ssenger, gave battle in 
the street today to four highwaymen 
who leaped into his carriage and at- 
tempted to wrest from him the payroll 
of the Xathan Manufacturing company. 
Resisting their efforts to subdue him 
with a rifle, a revolver and clubs, he 
fouglit to such good purpose that he 
saved the money, although he was shot 
in the arm and his scalp laid open 
with a blow from a club. 

Policemen on fixed posts heard the 
shooting and ran to hia aid. At their 
approach the highwaymen 'fled. One 
of them was shot by a bluecoat; an- 
other was captured after a thrilling? 
chase; two of them escaped. Wintress 
was taken to a hospital. 

ARRESfMAfSOLVE 
MILL CITY ROBBERY 



Ordinance Amended So As 

to Overcome Objections 

of Business Men. 



Opposition Develops to Plan 

for Divorcing Saloons From 

Brewery Control. 

When the new liquor ordinance in- 
troduced by Commlslsoner Hlcken 
oom^s up for its third reading at the 
next meeting of the commission, wliich 
will probably be next Monday after- 
noon, tlie part which prohibits chop 
hou.sf'S In saloons will be eliminated. 

Considerable opposition has devel- 
oped to that part of the ordinance. The 
sentiment ha.s been that it is unreason- 
able and would be equivalent to con- 
flscallun in many instances. The eat- 
ing places In saloons are among the 
best known In the city and are patron- 
ized by many bu.slness men, who as- 
aert that to shut them out would be an 
lnju.-<tioe. The free lunches, music and 
gambling devices will go, however, and 
no tears will be shed over them. 

The same ordinance prohibits any 
saloun from obtaining flnanclal aid 
from any brewery or any of ita agents. 
In short, tlie ordinance eliminates all 
connection between breweries and sa- 
loons, except so far as they may have 
business dealings with them In the 
purchase of theii" product, and they 
must be strictly upon an independent 
basis. 

Opposition to that has also mater- 
ialized. It was stated this morning 
that brewery cuntrol of saloons Is not 
desirable but that those saloons should 
not be put out of business at one 
Bweep. It was pointed out that It will 
chop 175,000 to 1100,000 from the gen- 
eral fund at once, which mlglit serious, 
ly interfere with the city's finances 
undfr present circumstances. The sen- 
timent expressed was that the change 
should be made on a more gradual ba- 
sis, dropping such saloon.s one or two 
at a time, giving the city an oppor- 
tunity to adjust Itself to the new con- 
ditions. 



Man Held as Vagrant Said 

to Be Day Hold-Up 

Artist. 

Minneapolis, Minn., May 22, — (Special 

to The Herald.) — A man grivlng his 

name as H. M. Combs, arrested today 

as a vagrant. Is locked up at the police 

station here, charged with the daylight 
robbery of several hundred dollars from 
H. J. Breilalm of St. Paul, on May 7. 
The robbery occured on a prominent 
street in Minneapolis and was seen by 
several people, but none of them. It is 
said, realized that a robbery was be- 
ing committed. The robber backed his 
victim up against a wall and took his 
valuables away from him. 



FIVE RESCUED ON 



LAKE MICHIGAN 



Pleasure Launch Drifts 

Four Hours at Mercy 

of Waves. 

Chicago, May 22. — Five men were 
rescued from the pleasure launch 
Commoner, tossing helplessly In Lake 
Michigan, five miles northeast of the 
mouth of the Chicago river early to- 
day by Capt. Charles Garland and his 
crew of life savers. 

The men were exhausted, and be- 
numbed by water splashing over them 
when the power boats of the life sav- 
ing crew located them in the darkness. 
For nearly four hours the occupants 
fought desperately to keep tlieir craft 
out of the trough of the waves. 

"You came just about In time," 
gasped one of the passengers through 
blue lips and chattering teeth. "We 
couldn't have stood it much longer. It 
was pretty tough out here." 

Tons of water were being hurled 
against the craft when the life savers 
reached It. The waves were running 
high and breaking on the launch. The 
five men were busy pumping out the 
boat. 

"Liverpool" Smith, the owner, said 
they had been out on the lake about 
six hours. His passengers, whose 
names he did not know, had asked him 
to take them on a pleasure trip. 

• 

Cien. lionuix IIa« Broken Hip. 

Washington, May 22. — MaJ.-Gen. 
Lundsford Llnd.say Lomax, one of the 
few survU-Ing Confederate officers who 
commanded troops in the Civil war. is 
lying at his home here with a broken 
hip sustained in a fall three days ago 
at Warrenton, Va. Gien. Lomax Is 78 
yeirs old, and because of his advanced 
age physicians regard his condition as 
extremely serious. 



amers 



•t-i- 



I 



Dangerous to 

Neglect Kidneys 

It is dangerous to neglect that de- 
pressing "all worn out," aching, 
feeling which generally accompanies 
the early stages of an attack of 
kidney, liver or bladder trouble. 
These troubles may easily advance 
with rapidity to a serious and danger- 
ous condition, involving the whole 
physical system. 



SAFE 



THt HtBWCTS 



• « •iJiK 



Warner's Safe Kidney 

and Liver Remedy 

will rid you of all the bad symptoms and make you well 

and strong and enable you to 

escape the agony and Buffering 

whicn follow the advanced 

stages of kidney disease, and 

of liver and bladder troubles. 

Only the best and purest of 

ingredients — the herbs Nature 

intended for the purpose— go 

to make up Warner's Safe 

Kidney and Liver Remedy. 



EACH FOR A PURPOSE 
1 — Kidney and LlTcr Remedy 
2— Bbeumatk RemedT 
S — Diabcte* Remedy 
4— Asthm* Remedx 
S— errlue 

e— fill* VBUloa.Be»» ) 

SOLD BY ALt DRUGGISTS 
Wnle for a frve larap'e rtrlDf 
the nanibrr of remedy (taaircd to 

Warner's Safe Kemediaa Co. 
Dept. 375 RecheetMr, N. Y. 



CITY MADE 
NO CHANGES 



Improvement of Twenty- 
Third Avenue Ordered 
Along Lines Suggested. 

Original Petition Specified 

Crushed Rock Above 

Fifth Street. 



Property owners alongr Twenty-third 
avenue west are havlngr a merry squab- 
ble among themselves relative to the 
character of the Improvement. 

The petition for the pavement of the 
avenue from Michigan street to Pied- 
mont avenue was ordered circulated by 
the old council and paid for by the city. 
Bides were advertised for at the In- 
stance of the former administration. 

Except that one block of paving has 
been added the contract awarded by 
the commission is for the improvement 
called for by tlie petitioners. 

The petition asks that the avenue be 
paved from Michigan street to Fourth 
street, with the remainder improved 
with crushed rock. The contract award- 
ed by the commission calls for brick 
from Michigan street to Third street, 
sandstone from Third street to Michi- 
gan street to Third street, sandstone 
from Third street to Fifth street, and 
crushed rock macadam from Fifth 
street to Piedmont avenue. Sandstone 
was deemed advisable because of tlie 
street grade above Third street, and 
except that the paving has been ex- 
tended to Fifth street, instead of stop- 
ping at Fourth street, the original pe- 
tition has been followed. 

LiHt uf Petitioners. 

The petition with tiui names of the 
signers, some of whom have been in 
the limelight in the present controver- 
sy, is as follows: , 

"That Twenty-third avenue west be 
regraded from Michigan street to Pied- 
mont avenue; that said avenue be 
paved from Michigan street to Fourth 
street; that a roadway twenty-six feet 
wide be constructed from Fourth street 
to Piedmont avenue, with rough stone 
gutters on both sides, and that the 
roadway be well covered with crushed 
rock; that all work be done which Is 
necessary to said Improvement; that 
provision be made for the drainage of 
surface water, and that the washout 
due to defective drainage be replaced 
by the city. 

George Farmer, R. T. Rolnlng, 

P. George Hanson, Ed Benson, 
Pierce & SchalTer, John Gelln. 
C. E. Tweed. John Erlckson, 

Anna S. Lofgren. 'W. S. EUlngson, 
Harry and Hannah Minnie Rlvlers, 

Christian, A. Peterson, 

Olof Peterson, Helen C. Rooney, 

Chas. P. Craig & Co. H. C. Hanson, at al„ 
John Wahl Candy John Olson, 

Co. Albert Landgren, 

Charles Benson, Ingwall Elde, 

John Anderson et al.John Sundqulst, 
Joseph Anderson Adolph Carlson, 

et al.. F. K. Budzynski, 

Edward Erlckson, Louis Johnson. 
John Jager, Burg Anderson, 

Ida M. Smith, Adam Sundquist, 

Fitger Brewing Co., Chas. E. Peterson, 
Zenith Telephone Chris Nelson, 



Co., 

Llston Q. Greeley, 
Hllma A. Jentof t, 
C. A. Linden, 
Emll H. Olson, 
Hartwlck O. Han- 
son, 
John A. Eklund, 
Sivert Aune, 
A. Swanstrom, 
Anton Strand, 
Benjamin Low, 
Caroline Slmard, 



Edw. Gustafson, 
Maggie Gustafson, 
Anton Nelson, 
Swedish Evan. Luth 

eran church, 
Henry Truelson, 
Emma W. Yergan, 
D. E. Stpehens, 
Marie Cease, 
John O. Hurtlg, 
Joseph Hanson, 
O. A. Oredson. 
Gust Borgeson. 



CHILD BREAKS 



SAVING BANK 



Six-Year-Old Boy Gets in 

Serious Trouble — Parents 

Away From Home. 

While the parents of an East end 
family were away from home this aft- 
ernoon their little 6-year-old son re- 
turned from school and went into the 
hou.se to change his shoes to go out 
and play. While running around he 
accidentlj' knocked over his strong 

ivmgs bank .standing on the side- 
board filled with pennies, scattering 
them all over the floor. Just then his 
mother came home and found the little 
boy In tears on the floor picking them 
up as fast as he could. Why, my son, 
she exclaimed, wliat's the matter. "I've 
broken my savings bank." he said, "but 
It was an accident." "Never mind, my 
son, mother knows It was and she 
handed him 10 cents and told him to go 
to the store and buy some Bonnie But- 
ter Bites, that delicious confectionery, 
made by the National Candy company, 
liked alike by young and old. 



DRAINAGE MEN AT 
THE WHITE HOUSE 



Thirty-Three States Repre- 
sented in Petition to the 
President. 

Wasliington, May 22. — Thirty-three 
fstates, with a population of approxi- 
mately 75,000,000, comprising more than 
75 per cent of continental United 
States, are represented at a meeting 
of the general education committee of 
the National Drainage congress here 
today. 

The committee arranged to present 
to President Wilson resolutions adopted 
at the third National Drainage con- 
gress at St. Louis In April, whloh take 
the form of a petition for the creation 
of a Fedt^ral department of public 
works and the adoption of a national 
policy of flood protection and swamp 
land reclamation, In co-operation with 
states, municipalities and land own- 
ers. After calling at the White House 
the committt^e had an engagement with 
Secretary Garrison. 

Tomorrow .Speaker Clark, Vice Presi- 
dent Marshall and Secretaries Houston 
and Lane will receive the visitors. 



NEW YORK EAST SIDE 
''ANGEL DOCTOR" DEAD 



Life Spent Helping Poor 
People Comes to Sud- 
den End. 

New York, May 22. — The Lower 
East .''Ide Is in mourning, for "The An- 
gel Doctor" Is dead. Thirty years ago 
he came to Little Hungary, and since 
that time had endeared himself to the 
poor of tho district by administering to 
their ills and steadfastly refusing pay. 



f^ 



llalatea Cloth 



We reserve the right to limit quantities. 
No phone orders accepted on Friday Bargains. 



30-'uylii\ ^Vhite Galatea Cloth 
for skirls, suits and children's 
dresses^ always 18c yard — 

Just for Friday, 
yard 



12V2C 




i 



Silk Mulls 



V» 



^- 



A sa\1ng of 5 Ho yard.) 



\>l 



IJ nmatehable 



.36-inch Silk Mulls, dainty de- 
.signs, excellent for waists and 
dresses ; values to 35c a yard — 

Just for Friday, 
yard 

(A saving of 16c yard.) 



19c 



Bedspreads; 

White C rochcted 
Bedspreads, 7.2.x80 in.; 
new Marseilles designs, 
for large beds; regular 
$1-48 quality; while 
they last 

Just for 
Friday . . . 

(A saving o; 



$1.12 



36c.) 



Dressing Sacques 

Women's Lawn 
Dressing Sacques, 
square and kimono 
necks; neat, dainty pat- 
terns; regular 50c kind 

Just for . OO-fc 

Friday OoC 

(A sarlng ol lie.) 

Beautiful 
Flowers 

for trimming hats; val- 
ues $1.00 to $1.50 per 
bunch; 

Just for 
Friday, buncl^ 



50g 



(A saving of 
to fl.OO.) 



It Pays 

to Shop 

at 

Freimuth's 



Children's Wash 
Dresses 




argains 



49c 



50c 



A 



W omen's 
Raincoats 



English Slip-on Rain Coats 
in gray and lans, with plaited 
backs; regular $2.95 value — 



C h i 1 d r e n's Wash 
Dresses; made of gin 
hams, percales and imi 
tation linen; neatly 
trimmed; ages 6 to 14 
years; 85c values 

Just for 

Friday . . . 
(A saving of 36c.) 

Ruffled Curtains 

Ruffled Muslin Cur- 
tains, plain and tucked 
goods; good 60c value; 

Just for Atig^ 

Friday, pair, ."f tlU 

(A saving of 15c.) 

Scrim Curtains. 

E.xcellent Scrim Cur- 
tains, white and Arab; 
worth $2.25; 

Just for 
Friday, pair . . 

(Saving 75c a pair.) 



lT2i2£S±|S 

ish ■ ^^^^^^^ "^i^ ^^^^ H y^rab; 

111 H fffcf ■frk'^ t^^i^rtta ■ ^V _. 



Just for Friday 




Read All 

Fretmuth's 

Makes 

Good 

Cluny Curtains 

Cluny Curtains, 2^3 
yards long, white and 
Arab; good value at 
$2.75 pair; 

Just for ^ I Q C 
Friday, pairyli99 

(Saving 80c a pair) 

Brocade Eoline 

Silk and cotton mixed 
spider silk; lavender, 
tan, pink and helio; 
suitable for class night 
and party dresses; 35c 
kind 



A 



if 



$1.50 



P 



$^4.00 Trunks for $2.98 

(A saving of $1.02.) 

$4.50 Trunks for $3.48 

(A saving of $1.02.) 

$5.00 Trunks for.... $3.75 

(A saving of $1.25.) 

$10.00 Trunks for $7.48 

(A saving of |2.52.) 

$14.50 Trunks for. .. .$10.98 

(A saving of $3.52.) 



Just for 
Fri< 



1 8c 



f Qxiatj 



^ 



Mday, yd 
(Saving 17c a yard.) 

Everett Shirtings 

1,500 3'ards Everett 
Shirtings in neat 
stripes and checks; 
regular price 12j/^c yd. 

Just for 

Friday, yd . 

(Saving 4c 



8^e 

yard. ) 



Unbleached 
Crash 

Extra good quality 
17-inch Unbleached 
Crash; always 10c a 
yard; 

Just for 
Friday, yd . 
(A saving of 2^0 yard) 



7*^0 



Stamped Bath 
Towels 

Newest thing in Art 
Embroidery; large size 
licav)' Turkish Bath 
Towels, stamped for 
embroidering; regular 
50c quality 

Just for 
Friday . . . 

(A saving of lie.) 



39c 



Pearl Buttons 

First quality pearl 
buttons, four holes or 
fish eye; all sizes; reg- 
ular price Sc to 10c a 
card; 

Just for Friday, 
3 cards for ,« 





Just for 
Friday . . . 



$1.75 



'<\. 



(A saving of $1.20.) 



The Best Value Giving News in T own 

Our Friday Bargains tell of wonderful savings- 
there are many words that express the money-sav- 
ing thought, but no mere words can make a great 
economy event— note the savings. 

ITiousand.s of our customers now know tlie real value of our 
Jii.st-for-Friday Barg;ains be<'ause w«^'vo always provitle<l depend- 
able qualities at very low prices — that's why these Ju«t-for-Friday 
Bargain Sales have won such widespread and constantly increas- 
ing success. The money-saving advantages of buying at these salo« 
are again clearly demonstrated by tlie offerlng-s for tomorrow. 



Girls; 
Raincoats 



\>, 



In striped rubber with 
plaid hood ; very natty ; ages 
8 years, 10 years, 12 years 
and 14 years; regular $2.00 
value — 

Just for 
Friday . 

(A saving of 75c.) 



$1.25 



Envelopes 

Chiffon cloth linen 
finished Paper; 24 en- 
velopes in a i)ackage; 
regular price 10c; 
Just for Cjfc 

Friday WC 

(A saving of 5c.) 

Pound Stationary 

Chiffon cloth linen 
finished Paper, 90 
sheets in a package; 
reirular price 25c; 
Just for ir^ 

Friday lUU 

(A saving oi! 10c.) 

Curtain Scrims 

Extra quality Cur- 
tain Scrims with drawn 
borders, white, cream 
and drab; 25c kind 

Just for 
Friday, yd . . . 
(Saving 5c a yard.) 



>^ Garden 
Rakes 



20c 



Untrimmed Hats 

Women's un:rimmed 
Hemp Hats; values to 
$3.00; w4^ they last 

Just for SOm 

Friday DOC 




Best steel gar- 
den rakes — a 14- 
tooth rake; our 
special leader at 

Just for 4oC 
Friday, ea. . 

(A saving of lie) 



Garden Weeders 

(With 4- foot handle.) 

A modern tool; our 

regular special price 

25c— m 

Just for lofi 

Friday, each. ■ '"' 

(A saving of 7c.) 

Lawn Rakes 




^ 



if 



Dimities 



Dinnerware Sets 

Jii8t for Friday, 

$30.00 Dinner Sets for... $18.98 

(A saving of $11.02.) 
$25.00 Dinner Sets for... $16.98 

(A saving of $S.02.) 

$ 5.00 Dinner Sets for $3.97 

(A saving of $1.03.) 



Splendid Lawn Rake; 
regular 35c valu( 

Just for 
Friday, each. 

(A saving of 13c.) 



22c 




Spading Forks 

Spading Forks sold 
at most stores for 75c, 
our special 59c leader, 

Just for AOgk 
Friday, each.*tOw 

(A saving of llo.) 

Clothes Racks 

Rome City Clothes 
Rocks, like cut; regu- 
lar price $1.00; 

Just for 
Friday . . . 

(A saving of 21c) 



79c 



(A saving of 
fl.50 to $2) 



A 



^ 



\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\V\\ 



CAKPET 
BI::ATERS 

Rattan Car- 
pet Beaters; 
15c Icind — 
Just for Fri- 
day, 9c. 



Kimono Silk 



Leather Bags 

Black Leather Bags, leather 
lined, 16-inch size; regular price 

$7.50. 

Friday $5i00 

(A saving of $2.50.) 

Colonial Water 



Sot Coupon 



BRING THIS COUPON 




SCRTTB 
BRUSHES 

Values up to 
19c — Ju.st for 
Friday, 6c. 
Basement. 



1,000 yards of Dimi- 
ties in light grounds, 
floral and striped de- 
signs; regular 20c yard 
quality; 

Just for 
Friday, yd . 

(Saving 10c a yard.) 



lOc 



Men's Silk Sox 

Men's 35c Silk Socks 
— black and colors; 
(run of the mill.) 

Just for 
Friday, pair. 

(A saving of 16c.) 



I9c 



Sprinkling Cans 

12-quart galvanized 
iron Sprinklers; regu- 
lar 69c kind; 



Just for 
Fridav . 



43c 



(A saving of 26c.) 




32-inch Kimono Silk in Oriental 
Ge^hia and floral designs, for 
kimonos and slumber robes; reg- 
ular 75c quality — 

Just for Friday, 

yard 

^\ (A saving of 16c a yard.) 



59c 




and 



38c 



Velvet Rugs ^ 



and 



get a 75c Colonial Glass Wa- 
ter Set consisting of 6 Colon- 
ial Tumblers and one 3-pint 
Colonial Water Jug. 
(A saving of 75c with coupon.) 



Extra quality Velvet Rugs ; 
choice colors and designs ; 8-3x 
10-6 size; worth $22.50— 

Just for 
Friday . . , 

(A saving of J 5. 00.) 



$17.50 



^ 



•""^T 



TE 



Few of his neighbors knew more of 
him than that, but when he died In his 
barren room yesterday they hastened 
out to spend their pcr.nles for candles. 
They marched up the narrow stairs by 
twos and threes, and stood In awe 
about the blanket covered figure. 

"The Angel Doctor'B" real name was 
Dr. Karoly. He was born In Hungary, 
60 years ago and came here In 1881. 
Soon after Tie arrived here he changed 
his name, calling himself Dr. Frank 
Charles. He practice 1 on the Paciflo 
coast and In Chicago for a time, and 
in 1883 settled on the East side. He is 
said to have been able to speak sev- 
enteen languages and was a profound 
student of medicine. 

Yesterday he was chatting with a 
friend when suddenly he started from 
hia chair. 

".Toe, I'm going; before It's too late I 
want to tell you the great secret of 
my " 

That Is as far as lie got before he 
fell forward dead. 




The Mam who put the 
EEs iin FEET. 



Trade Murk. 



Look for this Trade- 
Mark Picture on tho 
Label when buying. 



ALLEN'S FOOT-EASE 



The Antl^^ptlc" Powder to be .shaken 
into the Shoes for Tender, Aching, 
Swollen P'eet. 'The standard remedy 
for the feet for a Q larter Century. 
30,000 tefltlmonlal^ Sold every- 
where, 250i Sample I'REE. Address, 

ALLEN S.' OLMSTEC'. L* Roy, N. Y. 



DR. REILLY'S LAST 
HOPE IAS VANISHED 



Milton, N. D., Physician 
Must Go to Penitentiary 
on Manslaughter Charge. 

Grand Forks, N. D., May 22.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Dr. J. J. Rellly 
of Milton waa rearrested last night and 
win be taken to the state oeniltntiary 
to serve ten years for manslaughter in 
the first degree. 

His recent application to the su- 
preme court for a re-hearing was de- 
cided yesterday against him, and he 
was taken Into custody at Larimore 
on a train while en route to Grand 
Forks. Ho had not been apprised of 
the decision up to the time of his ar- 
rest. 

Dr. Rellly, heretofore confident that 
he would evade the prison sentence Im- 
posed by the Jury that found him 
guilty. Is broken In spirit. He de- 
clares the conviction unjust. 

The death of Mrs. William Drury, 
through an Illegal opei-atlon, wfui re- 
sponsible for the man.slaughter 
charges against Dr. Rellly. 

HEADQUA RTERS ^HANGE. 

Mail Clerks Would Like to Run Out of 
New Rockford, N. D. 

Grand Forks, N. D., May 22. — (Spec'al 
to The Herald. > — New Rockford watits 
to be division headquarters of rail- 
way postal clerks running out of the 
Twin Cities when the npw line is used 
by the Great Northern fast mall. Dele- 
gates representing that city were 



hero yesterday conferring with Division 
Chief McBrlde on the question. It la 
not expected that the mall train will 
be operated over the line till In Au- 
gust. 

Most of the mall clerks affected live 
In Devils I^ake. Those who reside In 
St. Paul would not be affected by the 
change except In so far as their west- 
ern terminal is concerned. 

Now Rockford la also busily engaged 
in an effort to secure the construction 
of a Great Northern line from Lari- 
more to New Rockford. 

TWO FALLWifH~~ 

HYD RO-AE ROPLANE. 

San Diego. Cal., May 22. — ^Lleut. Sam- 
uel H. Breerton, tJnited States military 
pilot, and J. D. Cooper, Instructor at 
an aviation school here, had a remark- 
able escape from death when the 
hydro-aeroplane in which they were 
flying over San Diego bay became un- 
manageable and plunged from a height 
of 150 feet to the water. 

Cooper, who was piloting the ma- 
chine, made a poor landing because his 
control wlre.s became clogged. Tlio 
impact threw both aviators from tho 
s.at.s in the maclUne. The motor, 
whlili continued running, sent tlie 
hydro-aeroplane 100 feet onward 
without them. Tlien It turned over 
and fell Into the bay. 

Breerton and Coojjor were severely 
larred, but waded a.sliore, the bay be- 
ing shallow where they struck. 

PARTS "0F"B0DY~ 

F OUND I N SEWER. 

Ma.liid. May 22. — A gruesome crime 
has been unearthed here. The victim 
was a well-known club man, Garcia 
Jalon. wlio disappeared two weeks ago 
after wlnninor $1,000 at cards. 

Portions of Jalon's body have Just 
been found in a sewer under the inill> 



tary college, near the quarters occu- 
pied by Capt. Sanchez and his daugh- 
ter. 

The police allege that Sanchez's 
daughter lured Jalop to their quar- 
ters, ajid with the aid of her father 
robbed and murdered liim. Both have 
been arrested. The police further al- 
lege that Sanchez has a bad record, 
and they fail to understand how he ob- 
tained a position in the military col- 
lege. 



PHYSIO-MEDICAL 

BODY ELECTS. 

Indianapolis, Ind., May 22. — Dr. T. B. 
Hammer of Des Moines, Iowa, was 
elected president of the American As- 
sociation of Physio-Medical Physicians 
and Surgeons at the organization's an- 
nu.al national convention here. Other 
officers are: First vice president. J. B. 
Stephenson, Chllllcothe. Ohio; second 
vice president. H. A. Hadley, Chicago; 
treasurer, H. P. Nelson, Chicago; sec- 
retary, J. C. McCandles. Chicago. Th« 
officers, with J. B. Ferrell. Parsons, 
Kan., and C. E. Milligan. Winchester, 
Ind., constitute the board of directors. 



Ilch! Ilch! Itch! 

Constant Itch. Intolerable agony 
ECZEMA! 

A few drops of a mild, simple, wash 
—instant relief — all skin distress GONE. 

D.D.D. Prescription for Eczema 

Sound.i too good to bo true? We are 
auiliorized by the D. D. D. Company to 
Kuarantee it 

The first full size bottle 're* If 
D. D. D. can not reach your case. For 
your comfort's sake, it is worth a triaL 
Come in and let us tell you about it. 
Also about D.D.D. Soap — It helps. 

For sale by Abbett's Drug stores. 



I- 



.»?• 



I u m Lm^ ■ 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 22, 1913. 



DOaORS AIM TO REACH 
FAILED EVERY CHILD 



Catarrh and Stomach Trouble 
Relieved by Peruna 



**<;-' 



Mrs. John 
U n derwood, 
R. F. D. 2, 
Box 90, Wav- 
erly, Ohio, 
writes: 

"Having 
had catarrh 
and ^tonlaoh 
trouble and 
having suf- 
fered very 
much, I, after 
being d o c - 
tored a long 
while, as a 
last resort, 
took Peruna. 
The result 
was wonder- 
ful. I would 
highly recom- 
mend it as a 
good remedy. 
I still use Pe- 
runa and would not be without it. I 
always have it in the house." 

Catarrh of Head and Tliroat, 

Mrs. L. A. Gray, 137 Main St., Me- 
nasha. Wis., writes: "I was troubled 
with catarrh of the head and throat 
for so many years that I thought there 
was no cure for it. Mother suggested 
that I try Peruna. I bought a couple 
of bottles and decided to see what it 
would do for me. I am a healthy 
women today, thanks to Peruna." 

Persons who object to liquid medicines 
can now obtain Peruna Tablets. 




"Safety Fi>st" Workers Will 

Visit Every School in 

Duluth. 



Mrs. John Vnderwood. 



Preventing Accidents Is 

Work of Mr. and Mrs. 

Hughes. 



To 

St. Paul 

Minneapolis 

^ sind 

Chicago 
Milwaukee 

^- SPLEI^DID TRAINS 

Electric Lighted 
Vacuum Cleaned 



Ticket Offices: 

DULUTH— J. P. Q»hr9y, 0. P. A. City^ 

offQs, anaidliif Holal biMk. Depot. 

CM-ntr Suserlor at. and Sixtt) Ave. W. 

SUPERIOR— J. D. Morriwey. G. A. City 

offlci, 823 TowM- Ave. Depot, eemer 

Winter St. and Ogdeit Ave. 



All the best new styles for spring 
an<5 summer are here In suede, 
satin, patent leather and gun metal 
calf. Sure to please the eye and 
satisfy the foot — 

$2.50, $3 and $3.50 

>t:E OUR WINDOWS. 

317 West Superior 
Street, Ouluth 

(Op. St. Louis Hotel). 




EVERYBODY LIKES 

"MimiESOTA" SPAGHETTI 

Those Duluth housekeepers, who 
are often puziled about meals, should 
serve the dellciously appetizing "Min- 
nesota" Spaghetti at least twice each 
week. 

The whole family, and the men folks 
particularly, will like the delicious 
flavor of "Minnesota" Spaghetti, and 
It gives them strength and vitality 
without overloading the stomach. It 
is much better than so many heavy 
meals of meat. 

And, besides, "Minnesota" Spaghetti 
is so easy to prepare and you make 
a big saving in household expenses if 
you serve it often — it costs only about 
one cent a dish. 

In.sist on "Minnesota" Spaghetti — 
made from the VERY BEST DURUM 
wheat with ALL. the nourishing Gluten 
left in. Adv. 



THE DENTISTS WHO 
MAKE PAIN FLY 




SET TEETH 

Fit (iuarAnteed 

fJold Crown tS.OO 

HridKe U ork, per tootlk 93.0O 

Ciold FilllniBrM, up from 91.00 

Kllvtr FillinKa 60c 

SKT OF TKF.TH »5.00 

NEW METHOD DENTISTS, 

I)lt. H. <, imo\V\. Owner, 

25 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

(Over Bon Ton Bakery. Next Door 
to Stack's.) Hours. 8:30 to 7. 



CHICHESTER S PILLS 




By Friday nlgrht fully 15.000 Duluth 
sihuol cJilldren will have heard safety 
talks from either Mr. or Mrs. Frederick 
B. Hughes of Los Angeles, representing 
the American Safety league. 

Since beginning their work in Du- 
luth Monday, Mr. and Mrs. Hughes 
have visited about half of the city 
schools, including the public and 
parochial schools and by FVlday night 
they will have completed their work. 
Lven the smaller buildings are in- 
cluded, and the aim is to Impress on 
every child in Duluth the first princi- 
ples of safety and watchfulness. 

"To learn how to avoid being run 
over by a street car, an automobile, 
a motorcycle or a wagon, or be elec- 
trocuted by a live wire, or be burned 
by a bonfire, Is Just as important a 
part of a child's education as to learn 
to read, " is the position taken by Mr. 
Hugiies. "It takes but a few minutes 
to impress on children the necessity of 
having their wits about them on the 
city streets, and we believe it prevents 
many accidents in the course of a year. 
If we can save only one child's life 
in a year, it is worth while." 

Today -Mr. Hughes spoke at the Mer- 
ritt, Fairmont and Polish West end 
Catholic schools and Mrs. Hughes spoke 
at the Radisson, Whittler. Webster, 
Ensign and Polish East end Catholic 
buildings. 

Saturday. after completing their 
work in the schools, Mr. and Mrs. 
Hughes will hold a series of shop 
meetings. They have already given 
three lectures to street railway em- 
ployes, and before they leave the citv 
it is estimated that they will have 
directly reache<l Ho. 000 people, and as 
many more indirectly through the chil- 
dren who talk to their parents about 
the lectures, the newspapers, the but- 
tons passed out and other methods of 
advertising. 

They will be in Superior next week. 
* 

TO RK.STOKK APPKTITE 



Take HorNford'M Aoid PhOHphate 

Especially recommeude<l for restoration of appetite, 
strength and Tltality. Non-.AlrohoUc. 



CONTROL BOARD 

AT SANITARIUM 



ye«r« k nown as B^t. Safest, Always Reliably 

SOLOBYOfilJOGlSTSEVLRYWHERI 



Look Over Anti-Tubercu- 
losis Institution at Walker, 
Hearing Plaints. 

Walker, Minn., May 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Members of the state 
board of control looked over the state 
sanitarium for tuberculosis patients 
near here yesterday and after an in- 
vestigation of charges that patients 
are not properly treated found patients 
have little cause for complaint. 

A careful questioning of the 104 pa- 
tients present brought out no com- 
plaints. Past complaints of one or two 
patients on the quality of meat, was 
from those who preferred mutton on 
the bin of fare when roast beef was 
served, and vice versa. As to the dis- 
tribution of gifts received at the sani- 
tarium office from friends to patients, 
it appears that only such gifts as in- 
terfere with the rules of the institution 
are not given the patients. Parcels of 
sweetmeats and other delicacies are 
withheld owing to the health of the 
patient. A checking up of those mak- 
ing complaints in the past, shows that 
a very large majority of the dissatis- 
fied ones are those who have been sent 
to the Institution at the expense of 
their county, so the members of the 
board of control state. 

Patient Denied AH .\re Satlnfled. 

Mrs. Bolusky, a patient at the sani- 
tarium for the past eleven months, on 
being interviewed, claims that the re- 
port of the officials who visited the 
institution are somewhat exaggerated 
when they state that none of the pa- 
tients complained of the food. Mrs. 
Rolusky states that all the patients. 
Including herself, were closely ques- 
tioned and that many of them com- 
plained of the cooking and the varietv 
of food placed upon the tables. "The 
medical treatment" continues Mrs. Bo- 
lusky, "is all that any one could ex- 
pect, but the quality and quantitv of 
food Is such that a majority of us" are 
weak for want of proper sustenance. 
The authorities have pronounced me 
cured, and If that be the case, I return 
to my home in Minneapolis tomorrow, 
cured — and starved." 

Isaac Rosenberg, also of Minneapolis, 
applied at the special coach of the vis- 
itors and asked to be taken to the 
Twin Cities. He arrived at the state 
Institution Monday from a Twin City 
hospital and claims his application as 
a patient had been favorably acted 
upon. After partaking of the food for 
a day and then by permission, scan- 
ning the bill of fare for the week, he 
left the institution, giving as his rea- 
son the preponderance of pork served 
in various forms. As the name im- 
plies, Mr. Rosenberg is of Jewish 
descent, and notwithstanding his strin- 
gent circumstances, did not propose to 
seek health at the expense of his re- 
ligion. The officials failed to find a 
place for him in the special car. and 
he appealed to the village authorities 
for assistance, being without funds to 
rettirn home. 

Sites for the various buildings to Ifc 
erected this year, were selected by the 
visitors and work will commence with- 
in the ne.xt six week.s. The sum of 
$167,000 will be spent. 

P. J. Swensen and Charles Vasaly 
represented the state board of control 
while Doctors Taylor. Schofleld, Hall, 
Camp and Smith of the advisory board 
were at the Institution. Other mem- 
bers of the party making up the spe- 
cial car were C. H. Johnson, architect; 
Charles Plllsbury, engineer; Dr. Charles 
Miller of Missouri and Dr. Dougherty 
of Pokagama sanitarium; and Mr. Mer- 
rell, landscape engineer. 



K. OF P^EUNION. 

Many Upper Peninsula Lodge Menfi- 
bers Expected at Marquette. 

Marquette. Mich., May 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Fifteen grand lodge 
officers of the Knights of Pythias and 
the Pythian Sisters are expected here 
for the Upper Peninsula Knights of 
Pythias reunion, June 3-6. The follow- 
ing grand lodge officers expect to at- 
tend the meeting: Charles W. Nlcholls 
chancellor, Lansing; H. E. Van de 
Walker, vice chancellor, Ypsilantl; 
James A. Mui, prelate, Port Huron; 
W. E. Hampton, keeper of records and 
seal. Charlevoix; A. E. Sharpe, master- 
at-arms. Sault Ste. Marie; Ray E. Hart 
Inner guard. Battle Creek; Robert J* 
West, outer guard, Deckervllle; Fred 
C. Wetmore. Cadillac; Victor Hawkins 
Jonesvllle; C. A. Palmer. Manistee, and 
Franz C. Kuhn, Lansing; all past chan- 
cellors; Mary R. Lochhead, chancellor, 
Pythian Sisters, Flint; Jennie B. Doyle, 
M. of R. and C, Pontlac; Ella Fllnk 
Jordan, M. of F., Detroit; and NelUe E. 
Knorr of Escanaba. 

The following lodges have entered 



ClK 6l<i$$ Block Store 



**ThQ Shopping Center of Duluth" 



35c and 50c Sponges Special 19c 

We have several fine Automobile and Carriage Sponges 
of very fine grade, bought at a great price conces.sion. 

On sale tomorrow while the lot lasts 
at 19c instead of 35c and 50c. 



»»■ 



A Sale of at Silverware 

It's a sale of interest to every '*June Bride" and those who have wedding gifts to 
buy. Many of the articles are less than the usual wholesale price. The goods are 
beautiful and include 

Solid Silverware, 
Sheffield Ware 
and Plated Ware 

Special preparations have been made 
for this event, and you can buy high 
grade silverware at a great saving. Be- 



low we mention a few of the savings 
As a Special We Feature 

Solid Silverware 

Within 10% of Plated Ware 




Table Silverware 

Our line of Plated Table Silverware, 
consisting of all the standard makes, such 
as Community Silver, Rogers Bros. 1847, 
Wm. A. Rogers and American Silver Co. 

Complete lines in all makes. 



June Price. I'lated Price. 



Set Knives and Forks. . .$11.55 

Set Soup Spoons $4.75 

Sugar Sifters $3.85 

Dessert Spoons ^4.40 

Serving Spoons $1.93 



$10.50 
$4.30 
$3.50 
$4.00 
$1.75 



Ready With the New Summer Line 
of the Famous Munsing Underwear 

Perfect fitting garments. Feel right, look right, wear right, 
fit right, 100% right. Sum up all the good points about under- 
wear in one word and that word will be Munsing. Give it 
a trial and see how much at home you feel in it. 

Complete Line for Women, Misses and Children. 

Women's Munsing Union Suits — Made of fine 
selected cotton ; made in all styles. Low neck, 
knee length, sleeveless; low neck, wing sleeves, 
knee length, also low neck, knee, in the popular 
»heet stitch finish. Price, per garment, 50c and 75c. 

Women's Munsing Union Suits — Lace trim- 
med ; closed, umbrella or regular style; priced, 
per suit, 75c, $1.00, $1.50 and $2.00. 

Boys' and Girls' Union Suits — Munsing 
brand, in all styles and weights; sizes from 2 
to 16 years. Prices, 50c, 60c, 75c and $1.00. 

Women's Summer Vests, 25c — Made of fine 
pure white cotton; either plain or trimmed — 
splendid value at 25c. 

Women's 50c Vests at 39c — In either plain 
or fancy, made of fine selected cotton. 



Sheffield Serving Trays 

Sale Price. Regularly. 

23-inch Serving Trays $37.50 $48.00 

20-inch Serving Trays $24.50 $35.00 

21-inch Serving Trays. $35.00 $42.50 

Sandwich Plates, grape des. $7.00 $9.00 

Many other interesting values will be found in 
our Silverware store. 

OUR LINE OF PLATED HOLLOW WARE is the largest in the Northwest, making the 

selection of suitable wedding gifts very easy. 

Sandwich Plates, Cheese and Cracker Plates, Sugars and Creamers, Baking 
Dishes, Butter Dishes, Tea Sets, Berry Bowls, Crumb Trays, etc. 

Engraving Done Free of ([Charge on Any of the Articles 



Sterling Silverware 

Sale I'rlco. liegularh'. 

Steak Plates $38.00 $45.00 

Berry Bowls $17.50 $25.00 

Bread Trays $17.50 $25.00 

Sandwich Plates $9.50 $13.50 

Comports $19.00 $27.50 

Nut Sets $13.50 $21.00 

Pearl Handle Knives & Forks$18.50 $25.00 




Please Note 



that within a few days we will begin in the 

Picture Shoppe 

A Sale of Frames 

together with several styles of mouldings, affording 
a special price occasion on framing orders. 

Also a Sale of Pictures 

of Hand Colored Reproductions of that daintiest of 
pictures, "September Morning," by Paul Chabos. 



An Out-Clearing of Threcj 
French Dinner Patterns 




We have three French Dinner Patterns; 
which we are unable to duplicate — open stock 
pattern — regular price $30.00 for 100-piece set, 
on sale Friday — 

Regular 
Price 

The quantities of the separate pieces range 
from 25 to 200 each. Select any amount and 
pay Half Regular Price. 



Half 



TriangleElectric Irons$2.85 I Yellow Mixing Bowls 



Highly Nickel Plated, 6-pound w-eight ; guar- 
anteed a lifetime, special here Friday at $2.85. 



10 rolls of Glass Block 
Toilet Paper for 

(Regular price 45c.) 





$13.00 tt 
Electric ^ 
Lamps for 



9.98 



Beautiful Electric Lamps, with 
I 18-inch leaded glass shade, twci 
lights fitted with silk cord, pull, 
socket ; reg. $13 value for $9.98. 



Serving Trays $3.25 to $5.95 

Just in. A new line of Wood Serving Trays, 
made by high-class workmen. 

In all sizes and shapes — 
they make fine wedding gifts. 

Friday Sale Thermos Botdes 



Just what you want for 

outing and vacation trips ; 

full line here. Pint sizes 
from $1.00 to $4.50; quart 
sizes from $2.00 to $7.50. 

Special for Friday — 1-pint 
size, leather case. 

Pints, single, at $1.00 

Pints, double, at $1.85 

Quarts, single, at $1.50 

Quarts, double, at $1.98 




Sale of Lawn Mowers 

Ready with a complete line of Lawn 
Mowers at very reasonable prices. 

Superior Plain Bearing Mowers, 14. 16 
and 18-inch, special, $2.98, $3.25 and $3.48. 

Northern King Ball Bearing, 14, 16 and 
18-inch, special, $5.48, $5.98 and $6.48. 



Fj lose Reel Special at 79c 

Made of oak. The sort selling regularly 
at 89c, special for Friday at 79c. 

Chicago Electric 3/^-inch Garden Hose 
— Without exception the best garden 
hose made, special Friday, 15c per foot, 
all complete. 





l-pint size, special 5c 

1^-pint size, special 7c 

l-quart size, special 8c 

2-quart size, special 10c 



Carpetine 

will clean any carpet or 
rug; cleans by evapora- 
tion; no dust nor dirt. 

Regular price $1.50— 

98c 

Fourth Floor, Paint Dopt. 



Buy Fishing Tackle 
at Half Price 

This includes Lines, Hooks, 
Nets, Fly Books, Bamboo 
Rods, Bait Boxes, etc. 

EXTRA SPECIAL — All our 

high-grade Flies divided in two 
lots; worth regularly $1.00 and 
$2.50 a dozen at, each — 

5c and 1 Oc 




Silverware Specials 

Warren pattern, made by Rogers 
& Co. 

Tea Spoons — Regvilar price $1.00 per 
dozen; special, set of o QO.*» 

for OUC 

Dessert Spoons — Regularly $1.25 per 
dozen; special, set of 6 AQ^ 

for Hue 

Knives and Forks— Regularly $2.98 
per set; special per set ^50 QQ 
of 6 each for ^^.OJ/ 



Special in Cereal 
Jars 

in Delft blue patterns; regular 
35c value, sale tf>i 

price ^IC 

Cambridge Vacuum 

Carpet Sweeper 

The best on the market; 
a child can operate them; 
draws the dust from the 
carpet; every one guar- 
anteed; most stores sell 
them for $10.00; our price 

$5.98 

Have one sent 
home. If it does 
not do the work 
send it back. 




the degree contests: Ishpeming, Crys- 
tal FaHs, Calumet, Laurium, Hermans- 
vllle, and Munlsing;. It Is expected 
that the Soo, Manistique, Hancock and 
Houghton will send in their notices 
before the end of the week, making a 
list of ten teams that will participate. 
The Crystal Falls and Laurium lodges 
have notified the arrangements com- 
mittee that they will also exemplify 
the work In the page ranK. 

FARGO IaNKE FdIES. 

Fargo, N. D., May 22. — (Special to 

Th^ Herald.) — Following an extended 
illness from which he was thougjit to 
have been convalescing, O. G. Barnes 
died suddenly of heart failure. He was 
vice president of the Merchants Na- 
tional bank and for many years was 
sheriff of Cass county. 



CONSOLIDATION 

IS EFFECTED 



Make Your 
Blood Pure 

By taking THE SPRING MEDICINE 

Hoods 

Sarsaparllia 

Made from Roots, Barks, ^lerba and 
other valuable ingredients. 



Merger of Giroux, Butte & 

Ely and Other Properties 

Completed. 

According to a report received here 
last night from ''Vllmington, Del., the 
rumored consoliditlon of the Qlroux 
Consolidated Copper company and other 
companies, has keen effected, Joseph 
B. Cotton of LKiluth concluding the 
merger movement at Dover, Del., yes- 
terday. While tlie merger is a large 
one and of great importance to many 
Duluth people, thi^ news in connection 
with it has been discounted by the 
rumors which have been printed in The 
Herald and whicli had the matter in 
correct detail. 

The principals in the consolidation 
are J. B. Cotton and T. F. Cole, both 
now in the Kast. The companies that 
will come into the consolidation, which 
will be called the Consolidated Copper 
Mines company, are, besides the Giroux, 
the Butte & Ely, the Copper Mines 
company, and th<> ChalnmaJn Consoli- 
dated. J. B. Cotton of' Dujuth, E. F. 
Cray of Phillips Alaska, and J. W. 
Allen of EllzabetV., N. J., were the In- 
corporators at Dover yesterday, the 
charter calling for a capitalization of 
$8,000,000. 

It is understoo(3 that the stock will 
consist of 400,000 shares at a par val- 
ue of |20 each, and it is said that the 
new company will Issue 14.500,000 of 



bonds, these to be convertible Into 
stock, and the money to be used for a 
concentrator and a smelting plant for 
the consolidated mines which are lo- 
cated in the Kimberly, Nev., district. 

It is understood that under the pro- 
posed plan of reorganization Giroux 
stockholders will receive one share of 
(he consolidated stock for ten of the 
Giroux. Butte & Ely will be traded in 
at the rate of one share for twenty- 
flve, but as to the other two properties 
the plan Is not announced. 



IRON MOUNTAIN Stock 

FOR SAIiE. 350 shares or any 
part tlicreof for $1.25 a Hhare ca«h. 
This offer Is jrood until Friday 
only. Address F 664, Herald. 



WANT SIBERT IN 

BIXBY 'S PLACE. 

Washington. May 22. — The contest 
for the appointment of a successor to 
Gen. W. H. Blxby, chief of engineers, 
when he retires next December, be- 

fan when Senators Ransdell of Louis- 
ana and Johnston of Alabama and 
members of the house from those two 
states urged the president to promote 
Lieut. Col. William L. Sibert. They 
declared that Col. Bibert. as engineer 
in charge of the Atlantic dlvlsfon of 
the Panama canal and builder of the 
Gatun dam, had merited the appoint- 
ment. The delegation also will call on 
the secretary of war. 



DRUNKEN MAN KILLED. 

Takes Last Nap Alongside Track 
Near Newberry, Mich. 

Nowbcrry, Mich., May 22. — Sleeping 
on the rails proved fatal for Gus Carl- 
son, who was killed by a South Shore 

freight near . here a few days ago. 
Cailson, who had been indulging too 
freely, went to sleep alongside the 
lallway track near Sage and was 
struck by a train and Instantly killed. 
He was 35 and had made Newberry his 
home for some years, being* employed 
in the lumber woods. 

would1ncr*ease 

naval cadets. 

Washington, May 22. — Senator Till- 
man's bill allowing the secretary of 
the navy to assign graduates from the 
naval academy to the lowest commis- 
sioned grades in the marine corps or 
staff corps of the navy, was ordered 
favorably reported at a meeting of the 
senate naval affairs committee. The 
bill would also nullify the act of 1903 
reducing the allotment at the acad- 
emy of each congressman from two to 
one, and would give each the former 
number until June SO, 1919. 

ADVANCE IN GRAIN" 

RATES HELD UP. 

Washington, May 22. — An Increase 
averaging about 30 cents a hundred 
pounds — approximately 36 per cent — in 
the freight rates on wheat from va- 
rious points of orisin in Middle West- 



ern states to destinations in the South- 
west, has been suspended bv the In- 
terstate commerce commission until 
Sept. 19. An investigation of the ad- 
vance will be made 



North Dakota Pioneer Dies. 

Bismarck. N. D., May 22. — The death 
of Mites Beach, which occurred here 
Tuesday, marks the passing of an- 
other pioneer of Bismarck. He was 
more than 80 years of ags and had 
lived in the capital city for nearly 
forty years. 

#_- 

No Rxhlblt at San Franrtaco. 

Dusseldorf, Rhenish Prussian, May 
22. — The northwest group of the Soci- 
ety of German Iron and Steel manufac- 
turers last night voted emphatically to 
reject "participation in the San Fran- 
cisco exposition." 




Oh 



n^^ood 



'OCe Joa't mIc jrou to 
take our word for Ute 
iwork th» truly worj- 
r!erful feed will do 
|for you< tri it oo 
your ewa chickciu 
at our cxpoaM ^ >< 

MftKJLPiMJLARD 

CO. 

FEEDS 



H. F. DAVIS ft CO., '^aviisr' 




iPUP 



Thursday, 



THE OULUTH HERALD 



May 22, 1913. 



Cbe 6la$$ Block Store 

"The Shopping Center of Duluth** 



Extraordinary Clearance Sale 




OF 



Trimmed Hats 

One Dollar 

ABOUT ONE HUNDRED HATS IN THIS LOT— 






Worth $2.50 



Worth $3 and $4. 



Worth $5.00 



For women, misses and children — black, brown, navy and a 
dozen other colors ; also white hats elaborately ^ ^ f\(\ 
trimmed, for children, all go at just ^ * •v/\/ 

Trimmed Hats 

Three Dollars 

These are white, burnt and light summery shades ;^ Q f\f\ 
many are worth $4.00, $5.00 and $6.00 «P«3«UU 



White Opening -Sr 



, May 26 
Forget ! 



Untrimmed Hats 



All Untrimmed Hats in our stock, except white and 
burnt, worth up to $4.00, are $1.00 and 



69c 



FARRELL QUIZZED 
ABOUT PRICES MADE 
BY STEEL COMPANY 

(Continued from pa^e 1.) 



s the contract had been re- 
. since the flling of the present 

"i know of no reason why there 
Phould be a secrecy about prices," he 
cniinufd. "I know of no contracts 
mail.- with anybody that might not be 
iii.ide with anybody else for large 
quantities." 

Ore Reserve Owuer«hlp. 

Because the United States Steel 
corporation owned some 75 per cent 
of the ore reserves of the country It 
would have been Impossible In 1901 to 
have organized another corporation its 
equal. Charles M. Schwab, ftrst vice 
president of the corporation, testl- 
tied during yesterday afternoon's ses- 
sion. The testimony was In cross- 
tjuestioning by government counsel. 

Mr. Schwab said, however, that ores 
could have been Imported from for- 
eign countries and a corporation as 
big as the United States Steel corpora- 
tion organized, provided Its plant were 
located In thf East. He conceded, on 
the other hand, that there were no 
othfr financial interests In the United 
.States as strong as those which went 
Into the corporation, namely. J. P. 
Morgan & Co.. the Rockefeller-Stand- 
ard Oil interf.sts. the Carnegie inter- 
ests and the W. H. Moore "group." 

Mr. Schwab completed his testimony 
and in the face of per.«i3tent efforts 
on the part of Judge Jacob M. Dickin- 
son, the government attorney, to gain 
Himl.sslons tending to show that the 
orporation was organized chiefly to 
prevent destructive wars among com- 
ptjtlng steel corcerns. defended the 
'•ompany at every point. 

Never Talked of Threat. 

In his conversations with J. P. Mor- 
gan that led to the organization of 
the corporation he had never, he de- 
.■lared, discussed the alleged threat of 
\ndrfW Carnegie to build a tube plant 
in competition with the National Tube 
•.jmpany, one of the concerns after- 
ward taken over. This alleged threat, 
the government maintains, was one of 
the factors which precipitated the or- 
ganization. 

In connection with present condi- 
tions In the steel industry, Mr. Schwab 
ti.stifled that "If I live long enough 
and have the money," the Bethlehem 
Steel corporation, of which he Is now 
chairman, will manufacture every 




product now produced by the Steel 
corporation. 

He said that the Steel corporation, 
on account of the advantage of own- 
ing the principal facilities, was able 
to manufacture rails $4 cheaper than 
other competitors, but said that was 
only "because the Bethlehem Steel cor- 
poration has not got the resources to 
build railroads of its own." 

■'How long after the formation of 
the corporation did the plan of de- 
veloping export trade take founda- 
tion?" asked Judge Dickinson, the gov- 
ernment lawyer, of Mr. Schwab. 

"I couldn't say exactly. I brought 
Mr. Farrell from Pittsburg to take 
charge of the export business shortly 
after the corporation's formation, and 
the business has developed constant- 
ly since." 

StatlMtles Sbown. 

Statistics put in evidence by the 
government showed that export sales 
immediately after the formation of the 
corporation were smaller than imme- 
diately before. 

Taking up the price of steel rails, 
Judge L5ickin3on wanted to know 
whether the Steel corporation did not 
make a larger profit on Its rails than 
Its competitors. 

Mr. Schwab conceded that the profits 
which the corporation's railroads made 
In transporting these materials ought 
to be substracted from the cost of 
making Its rails. 



WANTED 

PIrwt-clas.s male Htcnographer. One 
capable of doins: ab.<«traet ^vork. Ap- 
ply KnutMon Fruit Co.. ^18 and --0 
West .Mlehiji^an street. 



NEW STRIKE IS BEGUN 

IN WEST VIRGINIA 

(Continued from page 1.) 



In the Kanawha district until he Is 
satisfied that "a crusade of insurrec- 
tion and riot ceases." 

A few weeks ago Governor Hatfield 
submitted to the miners and opera- 
tors of the Kanawha field a peace 
proposal which was accepted by both 
sides. Although there was no pre- 
vious recognition of the miners' union, 
both sides agreed and the strike in 
Kanawha field was declared at an end, 
but troops were not withdrawn. 

The strike in the New River field 
last night is charged to the operators 
because of their alleged dismissal of 
men affiliated with the union. 

Twelve Prlaonern Freed. 

Throughout the entire strike trouble 
has run a period of bloodshed and 
rioting. It has been impossible to 
check the violations as they were scat- 
tered and occurred in Isolated moun- 
tain .spots. 

After a conference with military ad- 
visors and others, which lasted until 
2 o'clock this morning. Governor Hat- 
field ordered the release of twelve men 
held under martial law. All were re- 
leased on their own recognizance. 

The governor did not release Fritz 
Merrick of Pittsburg. Pa., editor of 
Ju.stlce, a Socialist publication, arrest- 
ed here while editing a local paper. 

Early this morning the governor re- 
Iterated that martial law would be 
continued for the present. 

Inqnlrj By the Senate. 

Washine^ton, May 22. — Senator Swan- 
son, chairman of the sub-committee 
which framed the resolution authoriz- 
ing a broad Investigation of conditions 
in West Virginia coal fields, was ready 
today with a report In favor of such 
an Inquiry The resolution closely re- 
Fsmbled that of Senator Kern, who led 
the fight in the senate for an investi- 
gation. With the backing of the edu- 
cation and labor committee and many 
prominent senators on both sides, Sen- 
ator Swanson hopes that It may be 
agreed to with little debate. 

Senator Kern, howevar, announced 



HOUSE. H ARTLEY A ND CRAIG 

Speakers Chosen for Public Affairs bortimittee Meet- 
ing, Which Boys Will Attend. 



F. E. House, G. G. Hartley and C. 
P. Craig will be the speakers at the 
meeting of tlio public affairs committee 
i>f the Commei'cial club tomorrow eve- 
ning when the sons of members of the 
i-lub win be guests. 

L.ettera have been sent to all mem- 
bers of the club urging tliem to attend 
the meeting, accompanied by their sons 
over 14 years of age. Many of tliem 
have already responded to the invita- 
tion and a largo number of men and 
boys are expected to be present. 

The meeting will be the regular May 
.session of the public affairs commit- 
tee and the regular business will be 



before the senate met that his resolu- 
tion would go over until Monday, when 
lie expected it would be passed. The 
senator believes the subcommittee to 
be appointed under the resolution will 
go to West Virginia next week. 

berunTecomes" ren- 
dezvous OF ROYALTY 

FOR wedding 

(Co ntinued from page 1.) 

of the royal procession carry loaded 
rifles. 

Emperor Nicholas of Russia arrived 
liere this morning to attend the mar- 
riage of Princess Victoria Lulse, only 
daughter of Emperor William, to 
Prince Ernest August of Cumberland. 

The Russian emperor was met at the 
station by Emperor William and King 
George of England and a great gather- 
ing of members of the various royal 
families. The Russian emperor drove 
with his Imperial host in state to the 
castle. 

Cjsar In Armored Train. 

Emperor Nicholas' journey from the 
frontier station at Eydtkuhnen to Ber- 
lin was made In the Russian imperial 
armored train. The arrangements 
made by the Berlin police authorities 
for the protection of his majesty were 
very comprehensive. The police were 
assisted In carrying them out by a 
considerable force of Russian detec- 
tives. 

The Inhabitants of Berlin, whose 
passion for spectacles is well known, 
were today able to obtain full gratifi- 
cation of their desires In that respect. 
J . e crowds were even greater than 
those of yesterday. People packed 
^ude walks, windows, balconies and 
roofs, whence they had an almost con- 
stant view of passing and repassing 
royal processions from 8 In the morn- 
ing until after noon. 

Very early In the day the dowager 
duchess of Baden, the emperor's aunt 
.'•nd the senior living member of the 
royal family of Prussia, arrived. She 
was followed shortly afterward by the 
ilulce and duchess of Cumberland. 

On each occasion Emperor William, 
the empress. Prince Ernest August of 
Cumberland and his bride-to-be, the 
Princess Victoria Lulse, together with 
a large contingent of HohenzoUern 
l>rinces and princesses, drove to the 
station to escort the arriving guests to 
the ci-stle. 

All the processions followed the 
same route, from the Anlialt terminus 
through Koeniggratz street and the 
Avenue of Victory and along Unter 
den Linden to the castle. 

KalMer Sprinted to Train. 

At the arrival of the venerable duch- 
ess of Baden, Emperor Willi-am — al- 
ways a model of punctuality — was 
late, probably for the first time In his 
life, and the spectators on the sta- 
tion platform were treated to the 
spectacle of his majesty In a hasty 
run endeavoring to reach the halting 
place of the railway car before his 
aunt stepped out. He lost the race. 

Beside the principal guests a swarm 
of minor princes and princesses ar- 
rived at the other stations in Berlin, 
each adding a flash of bright color 
to the .streets while passing to the 
castle, the palaces and the hotels 
where they are to be lodged during 
the wedding festivities. 

The throngs on the rtreets were 
good-naturedly enthusiastic In their 
demonstrations, and there was an al- 
most constant roll of cheering 
throughout the day. The weather was 
again fine and the streets presented 
a verj animated appearance with tlie 
lines of soldiers of the guards of the 
army corps, in their brilliant uniforms 
which the members of the bugdet com- 
mittee of the Imperial parliament this 
week demanded should be abolished 
for more practical clothing. 

The police handled the crowds along 
the route with suavity and skill. 

JAPANESE OFFICIALS 
dissatisfied WITH 
WAS HINGT ON REPLY 

(Continued from page 1.) 

atlon In the Webb law that it was not 
to be construed as abrogating any 
treaty provision which, thereby ap- 
peared to assure the Japanese against 
lawful escheatment of their property, 
it was felt that the national govern- 
ment could do nothing less than admit 
that the framers of the Webb act 
seemed to have succeeded in their pur- 
pose to make it proof against attacks 
in the courts. 

Opening for Legal IMlndn. 
Officials gather from the Toklo dis- 
patches that the negotatlons are drift- 
ing Into the stage of pure disputation, 
where the International lawyers on 
both sides will have ample opportunity 
to exercise their full resources in de- 
termining the exact relation between 
the California law and the treaty of 
1911. Some expect that the result will 
be an invocation by the Japanese gov- 
ernment of the right of arbitration 
guaranteed by the special treaty of 
1908. 



Jap Meeting at Frtoco. 

San Francisco, Cal., May 22. — Soroku 
Ebara and Ayao Hattorl, the Japanese 
statesmen who have come to Califor- 
nia to make an investigation of the 
Japanese situation, went to San Jose 
today to continue their Inquiry. 

The mass meeting at which they 
spoke here last night was attended by 
4,000 of their countrymen. The meet- 
ing was orderly, the large audience 
listening attentively and with great 
interest to the addresses of the dis- 
tinguished visitors. 

Dr. Kuroza, vice president of the 
Japanese Association of America, pre- 
sided. All of the speakers expressed 
the belief that a peaceable solution 
of the controversy over the recently 
enacted alien land holding law would 
be reached. 

Came Under Old Agreement. 

Mr. Hattorl said: 

"Japan entered into treaty relations 
with the United States after the per- 
sistant persuasion of Commodore 
Perry. In their first treaty Japan and 
the United States agreed that each 
country should be entitled to free im- 
migration Into the other. By that in- 
vitation we came here, trusting our 
lives and property Into the hands of 
the American people. 

"In on»' respect we have more free- 
dom In this country than In others. 
White or negro may marry with the 
Japanese without Interference on the 
part of the law. 

"The gentlemanly agreement of 1907 
was strictly observed by Japan, and 
no fault was to be found with that 
country. 

"We believe the United States gov- 
ernment will solve the present ques- 
tion according to the principles of Jus- 
tice and humanity." 

Mr. Ebara, who counselled patience 
and calmness, said It was the duty of 
the United States, and not merely an 



transacted. The boys v 
public spiritejA ma of I 
civic affairs, and That 1 
an education to tiieni. 
lar l>usine»s talks will I 
benefit of tlie boys. 

A special committee 
Cabe as chairman has 
by the Commercial clu 
boys of the cfty into cl 
tlie organization. In a 
hoys of today will be > 
luth, and they will be 
take an Interest in cl 
giving tliem inslglit i 
the Commercial club be 
will take up civic wo 
with greater interest t 
thiLsiasm. 



/^ill see how the 
luluth deal with 
n itself will be 
After the regu- 
)e given for the 

with W. J. Mc- 
been appointed 
b to bring the 
oser touch with 

few years the 
he men of Du- 

called upon to 
I'lc affairs. By 
oa ffaira now, 
lleves that they 
rk at manhood 
nd greater en- 



obllgation, to give fair and equal 
treatment to the Japanese. 
"Duty and lllKbt.*' 

"And it is a duty and a right." h.- 
continued, "for us to claim treatment 
by the American people equal to that 
accorded European Immigrants." 

Coolheadedness and moderation were 
urged upon the Japanese residents of 
California at a mass meeting here last 
night by Soroku P^bara, a member of 
the house of peers and of the govern- 
ment party, who la one 3f a commission 
sent to this state to investigate tUc 
Japanese land holding controversy. 

The venerable statesman pointed out 
that it was the unanimous desire of 
the people of his country to reach a 
satisfactory settlement of the diffi- 
culty, and It undoubtedly could be ac- 
complished by peaceable means. The 
relations between the two countries, 
he said, had been such in the past as 
to preclude the possibility of anything 
but an amicable settlement. 

For Peaceful Solution. 

"The whole of Japan — the govern- 
ment, the political parties and the com- 
mercial bodies — is uranlmously en- 
deavoring," he said, 'to solve this Cali- 
fornia question peacefully. And «t 
seems to me the Japanese government 
is fully competent to settle this dlf- 
llculty satisfactorily. There Is abso- 
lutely no need for you to pack up your 
things to go back "to Japan In fear of 
something happening. 

"California is only one part of this 
great country, after all. Fortunately 
for you, you have the sympathy of the 
Federal government and a greater part 
of the citizens of this country. Even 
In California you have a great many 
supporters and svmpathlzers. 

"I have always admired the Ameri- 
can people for their greatness — for 
their sense of Justice and fair play. 
With these qualities In mind, you must 
wait patiently. Attend to your work 
and business Just as usual, without any 
fear. 

"You are now as though on a ship 
on a stormy sea. But the captain is 
commanding the ship. Trust your des- 
tiny to him. The ship cannot be di- 
rected by everybody." 

Fe¥v Beeonie C itlzenii. 

Of fifty Japanese born in Honolulu 
and eligible to American citlzenshp, but 
fifteen have availed themselves of the 
opportunity, according' to the state- 
ment of Gilbert D. Metzger, a Honolulu 
contractor who has arrived here. 

"It has been my observation" he said, 
"that Japanese are absolutely loyal to 
their own government and do not care 
to become American citizens or perma- 
nent residents, even wl en they may." 

The Hawaiian islandfi have a popula- 
tion of Japanese laborers estimated at 
75.000. 



Get "Dry" Advocate'n Portrait. 

Bismarck, N. D., May 22. — The gov- 
ernor's office has received a framed 
portrait of the late Arne P. Haugen. 
The portrait was .«!env. by the North 
Dakota Total Ab.'stinGnce association 
through Its secfetiry and will be hung 
in the house chamber. Haugen was 
prominently known over the state for 
his activity in behalf of the prohibi- 
tion laws of the state. 



BASEBALL 

TOMORROW 3:30 

DULUTH vs. MIMNEAPOLIS. 



QUIZ breen once more 

(Continued from page 1.) 

dltlons Imposed he had refused the 
offer. 

Up to the opening of today's ses- 
sion none of tne test mony had con- 
nected Mr. Wood with the alleged con- 
spiracy. 

The alleged purpose In "planting" 
the explosive was to create a suspicion 
that the strikers planned to blow up 
the mills and thus prejudice the pub- 
lic against the labor element. 
Collins Was F.eealled. 

Before the cross examination of 
Breen was resumed today, Collins was 
recalled to testify to a conversation 
with Breen after the latter's convic- 
tion. The witness could not remem- 
ber that Breen had said "I am going 
to get back at those people because 
they gave me a raw dial," and did not 
think that he had told anyone of such 
a conversation. 

Breen then took the stand and was 
questioned regarding a telephone con- 
versation with Police I ispector Rooney 
of Boston, on the night of Jan. 19. He 
said that when he told the Inspector 
not to come to Law -ence until the 
next morning it was not because he 
had not finished "planting" the dyna- 
mite. Some of the explosive was placed 
after Rooney's arrival at Lawrence. 

Reference was made to the suits for 
damages brought against Breen by 
those who had been arrested after 
dynamite had been lound on their 
premises. The witness could not recall 
that he had agreed with the attorney 
for two of the plaintiffs to settle by a 
cash payment to each of the parties of 
$300 nor could he remember having 
postponed the promised payments. 

"Did you say to Atteaux when you 
came to him foi $13.00i) that your trial 
had bankrupted you?" asked Mr. Coak- 
ley. 

Denlf^d Reference to Wood. 

"I don't remember. I may have," re- 
plied the witness. 

Ho denied that he had said to At- 
teaux: "If you asked Mr. Wood don't 
you think he would help me out?" and 
that Atteaux replied: 'I would as soon 
think of taking Mr. Wood by the 
throat as of mixing liim up In such 
a nasty mess as this l3." 

Referring to the telephone conversa- 
tions between Atteaux and him.self. 
Breen said he could nol recall one dur- 
ing which he said to ./Uteaux: 

^There's going to te an -"xploslon 
one of these days." And to which At- 
teaux replied: "I hof.e It won't be 
dynamite," and hung up the receiver. 

The witness denied emphatically hav- 
ing said to Atteaux ovjr the telephone 
on another occasion: 

"I wonder how your rich friend 
would like to have the labor men know 
about this?" 

Sent Him to l-awyer. 

Breen said that Attiviux finally re- 
ferred h'm to William B. Watts, a 
former chief Inspector of the Boston 
police, and Watts in turn sent him to 
Attorney Coakley. 

— • 

W^lnonlans Denr Guilt. 

Winona. Minn., May 22, — Frank M. 
Zanders and Fred U Williams of Aus- 
tin and R. W. Zandeis of Owatonna 
pleaded not guilty In United S'tates 
court here yesterday lo taking away 
from the express ofi'lces copies of 
a notorious Bismarck publication and 
their case was coTitlnjed to the No- 
vember term or Until after the trial 
at Bismarck of Sam Clark, the pub- 
lisher. 



WATCH 

OUR 

WINDOWS 



iviiul.ine:rV department 
lOS and 107 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 



DOIT 

OVERLOOK 

THIS 

OPPORTUIITY 



For Friday— A Great Sale of 



/g enuine 




360 Real Panamas 

in Styles as Shown Here 

at JUST ONE-HALF 

What You Would Pay 

Elsewhere 



$6.00 and $7.00 
Qualities 

$3.98 



$8.00 and $9.50 
Qualities 

90bwO 



These Panamas are a very fine weave and hand blocked. The newest shapes for summer wear — 
in small, medium and large sizes. These are the REAL PANAMAS AND NOT THE IMITA- 



TION — every Panama we sell is imported direct by us. The quantity ^oJ^QClAf^ 
sell at these prices is limited, so we advise you to BUY ONE NOW. They ▼ C '*'^ N ^K' 
should sell regularly at $6.00 to $9.50, for Friday W^= D wi 




UNTRIMMED g HATS 50g & $1 



WE TRIM HATS FREE. 



WE TRIM HATS FREE. 



OWEN PROPOSES TO 
MUZZLE THE SENATE 



Will Add Another to Many 
Efforts to Curb De- 
bate There. 

"Washington, May 22. — Senator Owen's 
announcement at the White House that 
he would flight for a limit on debate 
In th© upper chamber was received 
with Interest today at the capltol. 
Many attempts have been made In for- 
mer years to shut off debate, and all 
have proved unsuccessful. A spectacular 

feature of senate procedure long has 
been the one man or two-men filibus- 
ter, and on many occasions a single de- 
termined senator has been able to 
"talk to death" a bill to which ho was 
opposed. 

The resolution probably will be pre- 
sented In a few days. It will go to 
the rules committee and may never 
come out, although Senator Owen said 
he expected to make a vigorous flght 
for Its adoption. 

MINE AT SMYRNA 
WRECKS FRENCH SHIP 



Five Men Are Killed and Six 

Dying of Their 

In jries. 

Smyrna. Asia Minor, May 22. — The 
French liner Senegal lies beached on 
the harbor front here today, half of one 
side torn out by the accidental explo- 
Hlon of a mine as she was leaving port 



late yesterday. Tho explosion was a 
terrible one. Instantly killing five per- 
sons and fatally Injuring six others. 

Fortunately for those on board, the 
liner was close to shore and In shal- 
low water, and maintained enough 
headway after the explosion to enable 
the captain to run her aground. All 
the uninjured members of the crew and 
the passengers were landed safely. 

The steering gear and most of the 
other machinery escaped Injury from 
the explosion, and owing to this fact 
the captain and his engineer were able 
to beach the vessel, thus In all prob- 
ability saving the lives of most of 
those on board. 



SOCIETY WOMEN TO 
GLEAN UP THE SLUMS 



How to Make Your 
Hair Beautiful. 



Ten Mlnuten* Home Treatment "\%'orlai 

WonderM, Stopm Falliiii? Hair, Itehlng 

Scalp and Dandruff and Makes 

the Hair Soft, Brilliant, 

liustrous and Flull'y. 

Better than all the so-called "hair 
tonics" In the world Is a simple old- 
fashioned home recipe consisting of 
plain Bay Rum, Lavona (de composee), 
and a little Menthol Crystals. These 
three mixed at home in a few minutes, 
work wonders with any scalp. Try it 
Just one night and see. Get from your 
druggist 2 or.. I^avona, ' oz. Bay Rum 
and % dr. Menthol Crystals. Dissolve 
the Crystals in the Bay Rum and pour 
In an 8 oz. bottle. Then add the Lavona. 
shake well and let It stand for an hour 
before using. Apply It by putting a 
little of the mixture on a soft oloth. 
Draw this cloth slowly through the 
hair, taking Just one small strand at a 
time. This clean.oes the hair and scalp 
of dirt, dust and excessive oil and 
makes the hair delightfully soft, lus- 
trous and fluffy. To stop the hair from 
falling and to make It grow again rub 
the lotion briskly into the scalp with 
the finger tips or a medium stiff brush. 
Apply night and morning. A few days' 
use and you cannot find a single loose 
or straggling hair. They will be locked 
on your scalp as tight as a vise. Dan- 
druff win disappear and itching cease. 
In ten days you will find fine downy 
new hairs sprouting up all over your 
scalp and this new hair will grow with 
wonderful rapidity. 

Any druggist can soil you the above. 
The prescription Is very Inexpensive 
and we know of nothing so effective 
and certain in Its result 



President Wilson's Wife 

Helps Work at National 

Capital. 

Washington, May 22. — With a one- 
day collection of $5,400, of which Mrs. 
Woodrow Wilson contributed flOO, so- 
ciety women of Washington today took 
the first steps toward cleaning up the 

slums of the capital. Mrs. Wilson, on 
at least two occasions, quietly has In- 
vestigated the noisome alleys and nar- 
row courts In which several thousand 
persons are huddled, and knows per- 
sonally the conditions that prevail In 
those sections. 

The money was collected at a meet- 
ing of the Washington section of the 
woman's division of the National Civic 
Federation, and will be turned over to 
a corporation headed by Brig. Oen. 
George M. Sternberg, former surgeon- 
general of the army. It will be used 
to aid further in the elimination of 
insanitary dwellings in the slums, and 
the substitution of clean and wl\ole- 
some houses that can be rented at 
nomlnaJ cost. 

Among those who subSKjrlbed was 
Former Chief Forester Clifford Plnchot, 
whose donation of |3,000 was the 
greatest Individual sum. The cam- 
paign is to be continued. 

HITCH DEVELOPS 

IN MEXICAN LOAN 



CENTRAL Sr 

30 East Superior Street, Dulutlu 

The only school In St. L.ouls county 
which teaches the stenotype; send for 
catalogue. 

BABBER & McPHER-SOX. 



ROBBED AND THROWN 
IN MINNEAPOLIS LAKE 



Wisconsin Man Tells of Ad- 
venture With "Real 
Estate Agent." 

Minneapolis, Minn.. May 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Beguiled to the edge 
of the lake in a city park under the 
pretense of Inspecting a site for a 
home, John Walker of Siren, Wis., to- 
day was robbed of $60 and thrown 
Into the lake by a newly-made ac- 
quaintance who claimed to be a real 
estate dealer, according to the story 
Walker told the police. 

Walker arrived In Minneapolis yes- 
terday on his way to work on a farm 
near Anoka, Minn. The stranger told 
Walker that he owned the property, 
and offered to sell him a lot adjoin- 
ing the lake for $250. While the pros- 
pective buyer was peering Into the 
water to discover a number of "gold- 
fish" that the "real estate man" said 
would go with the lot, the latter 
snatched Walker's pocketbook from his 
hip pocket, threw the owner Into the 
lake and fled. 



Deputies Claim Best Offer 

of Money Was Not 

Accepted. 

Mexico City, May 22. — The discussion 
of the remaining article of the bill 
authorizing the Issue by the Mexican 
government of a loan of $100,000,000 at 
6 per cent, has developed a hitch In 
tho chamber of deputies which may 
delay the completion of the transac- 
tion. 

The charge was reiterated by many 
deputies at last night's session that 
the best offer for the loan had not 

been accepted by the Mexican govern- 
ment. The assertion ^as made that 
the minister for war. Gen. Manuel Mon- 
dragon, had negotiated a better offer. 
A resolution was then passed by the 
deputies to call him to the chamber 
and ask him for a declaration on the 
subject. At 10 o'clock last night the 
deputies declared the chamber in per- 
manent se.sslon until the matter had 
been settled. 

Provisional President Huerta had In 
the meantime sanctioned the accept- 
ance of the offer of a loan by French 
financiers which had been agreed to 
yesterday by the members of the cab- 
inet and also In principle by the depu- 
ties. 



FOR DULUTH PEOPLE 

Duluth Citizens* Experiences FumisTi 
Topic for Duluth Discussion. 

The followinjf experience occurred 

in Duluth. A Duluth citizen re- 
lates it. 

Similar experiences are occurring 
daily. 

Duluth neople are being relieved. 

Getting rid of distressing kidney 
ills. 

Try Doan's Kidney Pills the tested 
remedy. 

Duluth people testify, Duluth peo- 
ple profit. 

The evidence is home evidence — ^the 
proof convincing. 

Duluth testimony is gratefully 
given. 

Duluth sufferers should heed it. 

A. Sidem, 728^ W. Third St., Du- 
luth, Minn., says: "I had weak kid- 
neys and was troubled more severely 
when I caught cold. Doan's Kidney 
Pills strengthened my kidneys and I 
will always ink well of them." 

For sale by all dealers. Price 50 
cents. Foster-Milburn Co., Buffalo, 
New York, sole agents for the United 
States. 

Remember the name — Doan's — and 
take no other. 



1^ 





Thursday, 



THE DULXTTH HERALD 




SELECT 
YOUR 





NOW 

AND PAY 

FOR 

THEM 




WE WILL STORE 

THEM FOR YOU 

FREE OF CHARGE 





T© SM 
YOdJ) FM 





»,:'''^ 





TO 





BECKMAN'S 

FUR 
FACTORY 




(6 EAST SUPERIOR ST. 




Invitations have been ii?sued for the 
oommeneement exercises of the state 
normal school, which will be held from 
Saturday. May 31, to Thursday. June 5. 
at normal hall. The exercises will 
commence with the banquet for the 
alumnae at Torrance hall Saturday. 
May 31. The commencement sermo:; 
will be delivered by Rev. Charles N- , 
Thorp, pastor of Pilgrim Congrega- | 
tional church on Sunday afternoon at ■ 
3:30 o'clock at the assembly hall. i 

The closing exercises of the training \ 
department will be held on Tuesday | 
afternoon at 3 o'clock at the assembly | 
iiall and closing chapel exercises and i 
class day will feature Wednesday, the \ 
hour set for the exercises being » , 
o'clock. ^^ I 

Frof. Maria Sanford will gire the i 
commencement day address at the ■■ 
commencement exercises ThursoAy 
morning, June 5, at 10:30 o'clock at tn«i i 
assembly hall on "What of the Fa- ' 
ture." and C. G. Schulz. state superin- 
tendent of public instruction, will pre- ' 
sent the diplomas to the graduates. \ 

ROLL BANDAGES. 



IS EARNING MONEY BY 
WRITING PLOTS FOR MOVIES' 



Doctors' Wives Give Linens for 
City Nurse. 

The social afternoon planned for the 
members of the Ladies' Auxiliary of 
the St. Louis County Medical associa- 
tion yesterday afternoon at the home 
of Mrs. O. W. Kowe, 2334 Woodland 
avenue, proved a most delightful af- 
fair. The members responded most 
generously to the plea of the city 
nurse for bed linens and towels for a 
chest to be used in her work and dur- 
ing the afternoon the members rolled 
four dozen rolls of bandages. 

Mrs. A. E. Walker, president of the 
association, read a humorous selection 
which was generally enjoyed, and Mrs. 
Horace Davis entertained the members 
with two vocal solos, 'A May Morn- 
ing" and "I Hear You Calling Me." 

ENGAGEMENT. 



Farewell Dinner Party Occasion 
of Announcement. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ilichard Dinham enter- 
tained at a dinner party lust evenlner 
at their home in honor of Mrs. Edward 
Perrott of Duluth Heights, who will 
leave Saturday for a visit in London, 
England, The affair was made the oc- 
casion for the announcement by the 
hostess of the engagement of her 
daughter, Millie, to George F. Hlckok 
of Portlond, Or. The wedding will 
take place in June. The table and 
rooms were prettily decorated in blue 
and white for the occasion. 
» — 

Students' Please. 

Pupils of Miss Mabel Fulton delight- 
ed parents and friends who were guests 
at a studio recital last evening, the ca- 
pacity of her studio in the Winthrop 
building being taxed. 

Vocal and instrumeneal numbers 
formed a well balanced program with 
Henry and Maurice Lavick, violinists, 
assisting. 

Probably the biggest number on the 
l)rogram was tlie "Barcarolle" from 
"Tales of Hoffman," sung by Miss Mar- 




cal, reflected ere 
and study. Oth» 
Grace Rossman 
Brand, Ruby I'u 
na, I'earl Mart, 
Larson arid Flo 
Two two-plan' 
tlonally well do 
nients weie pla> 
Miss Violet Flaa 



dlt foi" careful training 
rs who appeared were: 
, Earl Gartto, Anna 
tterson, Gurdun Thra- 
.Sheldon Johnson, Ruth 
rence Mattson. 
1 numbers were excep- 
ne and the accompani- 
ed by Miss Fulton and 
ten. 



"DIAMONDvS AND HEARTS." 



Sodality Girls Will Give Play. 

Girls of the Si>dality of St. Clement.s 
church are practicing a little comedy 
drama, "Diamonds and Heart.s," under 
the direction o) Miss Mary bhesgren, 
which they will give on Tuesday eve- 
ning. May 27. at the hall of St. Clem- 
ents churcli at 8 o'clock. Rehearsals 
are working the piece Into a pleasing 
smoothm ss, which promises a good 
production. 

Hosts at Dance. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Harlman enter- 
tained at an ii formal dancing party 
last evening at their home, 2400 East 
Superior street 

— ♦ 

Lodjje Affairs. 



MARCHIONESS TOWNSEND. 

The marchioness of Townsend is one 
of the En.glish society women who have 
taken to writing. She is earning quite 
a large salary for turning out picture 
comedies and tragedies. Her plots all 
deal with Incidents in the lives of so- 
ciety folks. She is a very pretty and 
attractive woman and is the owner of 
some 20,000 acres of land and a num- 
ber of large houses. 



ANNUAL 



KINDERGARTEN FESTIVAL 

CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL 
AUDITORIUM 

FRIDAY EVENING AT 8 O'CLOCK 

.Xdiilts, 25c. Children, loc. 



guerite McDonald and Miss Borghll 
Dahl, with an accompaniment of the 
two violins, which was repeated in re- 
sponse to prolonged applause. 

Miss Bern ice Havtrty in her piano 
number was most enthusiastically re- 
ceived and Master Sheldon Johnson also 
did exceptionally well in his piano 
number. Mrs. E. C. Smith was unable 
to sing on account of illness and her 
number was filled by Miss Marguerite 
McDonald who sang, "Ellegie" by Mes- 
senet delightfully. 

AH of the pupils, both piano and vo- 



WHO HAS HEALTHIE ST BABY? 

Duluth Physicians Will Compare Infants at Masonic 
Temple Friday Afternoon— Good Attendance at In- 
fant Welfare Exhibit Which Is Now Open to Public. 



Aerial hive, .N 
bees will meet 
Odd Fellows' t 
and West Foun 
will be cloBtd a 
class of candid 
social hour will 
Edmunds of I'ir. 
supreme comma 
honor and assis 
the hive will c< 
The hive Is arr 
Convention" to I 
nlng of next wet 
4 

Mrs. John Bi 
square entertai 
club yesterday j 
Five hundred Wi 
the prizes goint 
Brunt, Mrs. R. 
D. Edmunds. Vi 
orating. Miss E 
entertain the cli 



o. 1)75, Modern Macca- 

tomorrow evenln/i' at 
■mple, Mesaba avenue 

h street. The charter 
fter the initiation of a 
ates and an informal 

follow. Ml.ss Mina D. 
conning, Mich., deputy 
ider will be a guest of 
ted by the officers of 
>nduct the ceremonies, 
anglng an "Old Maids' 
>e held Wednesday eve- 

k at the temple. 

« * 
irnett of 618 Cascade 
ned the Fraternal B. 
ifternoon at her home. 
IS played at five tables 
r to Mrs. Norman Van 
Holmes and Miss Mina 
olets were used in dec- 
lllzabeth Goodman will 
lb Wednesday, June 10. 



Personal Mention. 

Mrs. Abbott McConnell Washburn of 
2419 East Fifth street left today for 
.St. Paul to visit her sister, Mrs. Guy 
A. Thomas of Clifton avenue, and her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mathias Frisk of 
1863 Marshall aAcnue, for a few weeks. 

Mrs. Guy E. Dehl of 1301 V^ East Sec- 
ond street has returned from a few 
weeks' visit with her parents at To- 
peka, Kan. .© 

« * * ' 

Mrs. R. D. Haady and little son, Ma- 
son, of 1922^ East Superior street left 
yesterday for Minneapolis to visit 
there and at Lake Minnetonka for sev- 
eral weeks. 

« • * 

Miss Lou Kiichll, Miss Helen Majo 
and Mrs. John Schlitz are visiting at 
Havre, Mont. 

« • • 
Mrs. Dixie Thompson of Bellingham, 
Wash., is the gu-st of Mrs. A. W. Hart- 
man of 2400 East Superior street. 
• • • 

Miss Katherine Hubbell returned this 
morning from New York, where she 
has been doing settlement work dur- 
inc the winter. 



Jtstiusements 



TONIGHT'S ATTRACTIONS. 



Tomorrow will be the big day at 
the Infant Welfare Exhibit being held 
this week at the auditorium of the 

Masonic Temple. For upon tomorrow 
afternoon a committee of Duluth phy- 
sicians will take their future into their 
hands and will declare who are the 
three healthiest babies in Duluth. 

The baby contest is absolutely free. 
Any mother in Duluth may enter her 
sn;all son or daughter. Each baby will 
be measured and weighed and tested 
and height and age and weight, teeth, 
disposition and other points depending 
on health, will be compared, and proud 
will be the mothers who take home 
with them the healthiest babes of the 
city, pronounced so by the most com- 
petent judges in all or Duluth. 

The speaker at tomorrow after- 
noon's session will be Dr. O. W. Rowe, 
who will most opportunely have for 
the subject of his talk "Feeding." The 
lecture will be free and mothers are 
urged to attend. Dr. Rowe will speak 
at 4 o'clock. 

The exhibit Is attracting many vis- 
itors. In spite of the inclement 
weather of yesterday afternoon, many 
mothers gathered at the temple to hear 
Dr. S. H. Beyer's talk on "The Preven- 
tion of Infant Diseases." Dr. Boyer 
gave a short and interesting and most 
practical talk on the simple but dis- 



tressing symptoms that almost every 
mother encounters in the care of her 
children. He was heard with much 
interest and profit by the audience. 
The lectures In connection with the 
Welfare Exhibit are proving a most 
interesting and valuable feature of the 
week. Last evening Dr. J. J. Eklund 
was the speaker and this afternoon 
Dr. C. H. Schroder addresses the moth- 
ers. Tonight Dr. J. M. Robinson will 
talk on "The Eye, Ear and Throat In 
Relation to Infant Diseases." 

The invitations to the exhibit have 
so urgently mentioned the mothers of 
the city that there has been a doubt 
In the minds of several whether men 
were welcome. The committee In 
charge most cordially Invites the men 
of Duluth, and the evening sessions 
are especially planned for the men 
who are occupied during the day. If 
the baby cries all night there are 
usually two people kept awake, at 
least, the father and the mother, and 
"Dad" is as welcome to learn more 
about his offspring as any one. The 
evening hours are from 8 to 10:30 
o'clock. 

But tomorrow afternoon especially 
every mother in Duluth with a baby 
under 3 years of age Is invited to 
visit the Masonic temple and to bring 
her bady with her. He may be the 
healthiest of three in Duluth. 



LYCEUM — Kincmacolor Motion Pic- 
tures. 
EMPRESS— "The Girl Question." 







By PEGGY PEABODY 






Mistake for Mothers to Leave 
Children's Care to Others. 

The modern tendenc;y of parents, 
jiartlcularly mothers, to shift the bur- 
den of caring for their children orvto 
• thers is deplorable, if not, indeed, 
ilarmlng. Where 
formerly it was the 
custom only of the 
wealthy to employ 
nurses to care for 
the children and 
provernesses to teach 
them, nowadays, to 
Judge from the 
daily procession on 
city streets. It has 
become the custom 
for many people in 
only moderate cir- 
cumstances to have 
.1 nurse-girl for the 
baby. 

It Is my idea that a mi>th(r who 
feels that she needs help with the chil- 
dren should get help in the kitchen — 
a cook and housekeeper and take full 
charge of her children herself. In 
this way, she can have help with the 
little ones whenever she needs it, and 
If she has someone on whom she can 
rely, she can get relief from time to 
time from her exacting duties as a 
mother, by mingling with her friends. 
No woman who Is worthy to be a 
mother wants really to get away from 
th^' burden of caring for her children. 
She may get out of patience n bit at 
times, and sometimes fret at the con- 
finement and the sacrifice she Is com- 
pelled to make, but she will feel 







^d 


^^ 




1 




*■■■■'■■■ "%| 

* y- <^diH 


W 




■■■^'^'■■"^ 


r '- 






B^''^* - 



ashamed of herself afterwards that 
such thoughts or feelings should mar 
her motherhood. The true mother find.s 
her greatest happiness and pleasure in 
taking care of the little ones whom 
God has given her, and she Is even apt 
to be a bit selfish about sharing her 
privileges with anyone else. 

Motherhood, and fatherhood as well, 
involve sacrifice — sacrifice of busines.s 
;ind .social pleasures alike. The mother 
with a baby Is, to a large degree, "tied 
down," but those friends of hers vt-ho 
are worth while will not desert her. 
or think her 'oollsh for giving up he; 
social duties, but will honor her for It. 

The mother who turns the care of 
her children over largely to others, es- 
pecially those whose only attachment 
is that of servant, who labors not for 
love but for money, takes a terrible 
risk. 8he risks the child's physical, 
moral and mental well-being, ^he may 
console herself into thinking that she 
Is supervising the child's bringing up 
and may be, to a certain degree, care- 
ful and conscientious about It; but she 
cannot vouch for the result as she 
could If she were the sole factor in the 
.'jltuatlon. There Is always more or 
less of a conflict of purpose and au- 
thority wh»re two or more, one of 
them outsids the parents, have a sense 
of Jurisdiction. , 

The mother who wants to get the 
greatest pleasure out of motherhood. 
a.s well as to discharge her duties 
faithfully, Is wise to take charge of 
her children herself, and employ serv- 
ants to do the tasks that they can do 
as well as she. 



Amusement Notes. 

Blanche Bates will be seen for the 
first time In this city as Stella Bal- 
lantj'ne In A. E W. Mason's four-act 
piece, "The Witr ess For the Defense," 
at the Lyceum Monday. 

The ruin that Impends over Stella 
Ballantyne for the justifiable murder of 
her husband ifi the kind of ruin 
brought about not by enemies but by 
friends. Stella Ballantyne is in India, 
married to a drunken bully, living in 
abject misery. Her husband is on the 
verge of delirium tremens. Thresk, an 
early friend of Stella, visits HeT Just as 
her husband is in the act of striking 
her. After Thresk leaves Stella kills 
her husband In self defense. She Is 
arrested, but soon acquitted on a plea 
of self-defense, largely because of 
Thresk's testimony. Stella leaves 
India, and two years later is living In 
Sussex, England. Richard Hazelwood, 
a young soldier has fallen In love 
with her. They are to be married. 
Again Henry Thresk coifie^ upon the 
scene, drawn there by the suspicions of 
Hazelwoods relatives. Thresk believes 
that Stella shou ,d not marry again 
without confessing the murder of her 
fiance. In the right Stella begs him 
to be silent and let her marry Hazel- 
wood and be happy. ' It is at that 
moment that thoy are discover.'d by 
Hazelwood. Stella Is forced to risk all 
her future by confessing her ugly 
past. But her woman's Instinct to win 
the man she loves drives her on. 
• * • 

Today the Empress management is 
presenting Its patrons the musical 
comedy attraction, "The Girl Ques- 
tion," with the clever comedian Ray- 
mond Paine. Coming from the fertile 
brains of three men who h^ve made 
national reputations in the light musi- 
cal comedy field, Adams, Hough and 
Howard, this pl< ce scored one of the 
greatest successes that any musical 
play ever produced at the La Salle 
theater, Chicago. It ran over 300 
nights in Chicago and was acclaimed 
on all sides as one of the brightest, 
catchiest and cleanest shows that ever 
held undiminished patronage through 
the sultry summer months of a Chicago 
season. 

The story deals with the love of Jo 
Foster and Con Ryan. Jo Is a wait- 
ress in the restaurant that Con pre- 
sides over In tht capacity of manager. 
Jo loves Con and he never suspects 
the love of the girl. Con is in love with 
I<]lsie. the cashle-. and her smile holds 
a world of brlgh :ness for him. 

Old man Sears with more money 
than he knows vhat to do with buys 
the restaurant and turns It into a real 
estate office. Con is thrown out of a 
Job and takes to selling books to keep 
the wolf from tie door. 

Jo comes Into a fortune large 
enough to keep two young people dur- 
ing their lives. She meets Con and 
notes his plight. It Is here that Con 
first learns of tlie love of the girl, a 
love that has r?mained loyal to him 
through the ups and downs of their ac- 
quaintance. 

The love affair of young Sears for 
Elsie, the coming of Baron Von Tas- 
man and the part he plays In the life of 
Jo and Con all jco to make a very in- 
teresting story. 

The character of Can Ryan, the happy 
go lucky, Is well taken care of In the 
hands of the comedian RayViiond Paine, 
while the part of Jo Foster is played 
by Allen Morlsson. , 

N. D. Trnch<'r«' Kxainlnatloim. 

Bismarck. N. P.. May 22. — State 
Superintendent of Public Instruction E. 
.7. Taylor announi-es that on June 6 and 
1 there will he examinations of appli- 
cants for professional and grade teach- 
e.rs' certificates held at Bismarck, Dick- 
inson, Hettinger, La Moure, Wahpeton, 
Fargo, Grand Forks, Devils Lake, 
Towner, Mluot and WlUistuxi. 



May 22, 1913. 




Established 1887 



First Street and Third Tivenue West 




GOOD 



jF'f/fif/ITi/I?£; 




Again we wish to call your attention to our wonderful showing of summer Drapery 
Fabrics. Great additions have been made to our Tliird Floor Department for this season 
and there you will find new fabrics of every description. Our Drapery Workroom and 
Upholstery Shop are in charge of skilled workmen (under the direction of Mr. Horace 
Brown) who are capable of handling your work in a thoroughly efficient manner. We will be 
glad of an opportunity to submit estimates on work and are sure we can give satisfaction. 




Sewing Machines 

Sewing may be a bother but iieverthe- 
'^ less it has to be done. Your spring sew- 
ing will go easier with a "FREE" MA- 
CHINE. It has many points of excel- 
lence and advantage over other machines 
far higher in price. Let us explain them 
V to you. Each "Free" Sewing Machine is 
"^insured for five years against damage. 

F. & B. SPECIAL Sewing Machines with complete set 
of attachments, 3-ply quarter sawed oak cases, solid cast 
body and nickel trimmings, for 
this week 



$m. 75 



A large purchase of 



N 

high- 



Specials 

Floor Oil Cloth— Regularly 45c; a 
good selection of pat- f^C%i^ 

terns ^ 5^^ 

Printed Linoleum — Reg- PtC%n 

ularly 70c, special '^ir^ 

Inlaid Linoleum — Regularly $1.20, 
will sell for per square C\f^r» 

yard VC/C 

27x60-inch Axminster Rugs — Just 
the size for a hall or vestibule; reg- 
ular price $3.75, for *j^ « Chfk 

this week W'* VC/ 

Standard Carpet Sweepers, with 
golden oak cases, can ^n O/^ 
be purchased for %pj£'mjC'Z^ 




grade Crescent Tint Shade 
Cloth has placed us in a posi- 
tion to make up shades at an 
extremely reasonable figure. 

Let us measure your home 
and submit a price. We equip 
all shades with improved 
Hartshorn Rollers and best 
fixtures. Make your selection 
from any color of this cloth 
we have in stock. 



Are You 



Usin^ a 
Duntley? 



This wonderful Pneumatic Sweeper will greatly re- 
duce the labor of cleaning about your house. Its low 
cost places it within reach of any purse. Every part| 
is guaranteed. It requires no electric power. You 
use it like an ordinary carpet sweeper. There's no 
noise, no vibration. The dust box is easily removed 
and emptied. It cleans five times as thoroughly as 
the common carpet sweeper with no more exertion. 
Very light in weight but very effective, ^ng 
Our price on this svv^eeper is ^^MMm 



Jewel Water Heaters 

We have the only logical proposition for heating water 
in the summer time for your bath. The water heater, 
shown in picture, has more feet of water heating ca- 
pacity than any other heater. 105 separate and distinct 
flames play on 24 feet of copper coil, insuring economy 
and 100 per cent efficiency — ^^^ i\fiZ 

special ^M€>m \/0 




Our Special 

Wringers 

With hardwood frame, 10- 
inch fine rubber rolls; just 
like picture ; regularly $3.25, 
for Friday and ti^€% O/^ 
Saturday ^j£rm j£r!^ 





Water Power 

Washing 
Machines 

6-sheet capacity, sea- 
soned cedar tub ; cost of 
operation will not ex- 
ceed 2 cents an hour; 
guaranteed to give sat- 
isfaction ; very special 
for Friday and Satur- 
day — 

$IU,50 



Aluminum Ware 

3'Piece Offer 

An opportunity to purchase 3 
Aluminum Kitchen Utensils at a 
very exceptional reduction. 

One S'Qt. Berlin v 

Kettle I 

One 2y2>'qt, Lipped \9 

Sauce Pan 

One Lar^e Size 
Prying Pan 

These pieces 'can be purchased 
separately if you so desire. 







smnm. 



CHILDRE N GIVE P ROGRAM 

Delightful Entertainment Marks Close of Miss Wilson's 

Elementary School. 



From the opening: march by all the 
pupils of the school to the end of the 
little play, pupils of Mis.s Wilson's 
elementary school acquitted them- 
selves with glory at the closing enter- 
tainment given this morning at the 
Young Women's Christian association 
before an audience of parents and 
friends which filled the hall. 

Master Stephen Jones, and little 
Misses Margery and I>orothy Merritt 
and Mary Roswell llorr were charm- 
ing and nalvo in solo parts with a 
lack of self consciousness unusual for 
such little tots. Under the direction 
of Miss Berta Rchmeid they have de- 
veloped a sense of rhythm and free 
expression and grace truly remarka- 
ble. 

Miss Grace Woolworth played the 
accompaniments for all of the num- 
bers, except the plr.no solos played by 
Stephen Jones and .Margery and Dor- 
othy Merritt, and little Miss Horr. 

A group of French games and scenes 
were given by the different grades 
with good accent and pronunciation 
and the closing nunioor was the little 
play, "The Spirit of the Glint Moun- 
tains" In three scenes given by the 
children of the thlid ijrale. 

Mls.s Mary Cotton as "Elsa" who Is 



A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUO'S 
Oriental Cream or 
Magical Beautifier. 



Removes Tan, Pimples, Freck- 
les. Moth Patches, Rash aod 

Skin 0l»<-i«es. an 1 vrer/ 
blrmiih on bcnutv, and d«- 
ftet dilecHon It' hat ttood 
\ih» Irst of f^ Nein, and it *o 
harmlcM w« taste It to b« 
»iire it is prcjwtly made. Ac- 
cept no cnunlerreli of tlmllar 
n.im«. Dr. L. A. 8ayr« 14)4 
to t Udy «f tha liautton (a 
latlent/! •At vou!»d)ei wilt 
uie them. I recemmcnd 
■uOURAUn'S CRliAM' as 
' c least banntui of all tha 
vin pre -aratldns." For tale 
y «li dtusfKlst* and Fancy 
t.qods D«aleii In the Uaited 
Statei, Canada and I'Uiopa, 

fui. I. Hopklus. ttw»^ 17 Crcat Jmm* SI« Vcw Yark 




stolen fiom a group it friends, pick- 
nicking In the mountains, by the 
"Spirit of the Mountain" and five lit- 
tle gnomes, was Jeliglitful in htr part, 
and Master Harvey Williamson as the 
■'Spirit of the Mountain" did remarka- 
bly well. The group of girls were 
Kuth Williamson, Joan Robson, Flor- 
ence Draper, Charlotte Dowling and 
Louise Bridenthal and the five gnomes 
were Donald Welles, John Magle, 



Carollre Robinson, Ruth Wanless and 
Stewart Peyton. 

The other children who took part In 
the games, and dialogues were: 

Winnifrcd Williams, Frances Tur- 
rish, Helen Christensen, Virginia 
IJi-ardlng, Mary Towne, Jessie Wilson. 
•Margaret Knox, Eulalie Chlsholii-, 
Phyllis Shaw, Margaret Mitchell, Will 
iam Magie, George Welles, William 
McMillan, Francis Sullivan, Irene Cas- 
sell, Margaret McDonald, William Van 
Bergen, Frances Cross, Katherine 
Wall. Bernard Killorln, Elizabeth 
.Magle. Elizabeth Towne, Donald Mc- 
Donald, Junior Crosby, Wallace Mer- 
ritt. ' 



Renppointrd By Ilanna. 

Minot. N. D.. Mav 22. — Governor Han- 
na has notified Col. .Mex Scarlett, who 
has been on the staff of ex-Governor 
Kurke for the past six years, that he 
has reappointed him on his personal 
staff and forwarded his commission to 
him. 



A GOOD 
PIANO 






ATA 

REASONABLE 

PRICE 

IS what every 
piano purchas- 
er is seeking, and on that basis 
we cordially invite you here to investigate 
this worthy instrument. Easy terms can 
be arranged. 



104 
Oak Hall 
Building 



Melrose 5590 
Grand 321 







^rmmrfm 



r-m* 



wmm 



mm 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 22, 1913. 



SCOOP 



THE CUB 
REPORTER 



Scoop Wasn't Taking Any Chances 



By "HOP" 




^T MV NEW FLrt5HeR- 
X PUT HVERV CENT Ij 

MAD iN \t-^«hk: yTS 

^ U>r 5(^F£R THAN 
PomMCr (^V MONtV 

I>lAMOKD f^Nt> 





) 




m% aieeks Sunday School Lesson 

YVWTTEN FOR THE HKRAU) »Y W^V 4. S. KIRTULY. O. IK 




i^l-\DAY SCIiOOK I.KSSOX: SI AY 25. 



Geuenii* xHII: 



ls-:Mt JoMPph 
jamln. 



find Brn< 



COXXKCTIOX. 

Th-' boys tok their corn hack home, 
leaving Simeon in prison in Egypt as 
a hostage, and were instructed not to 
return wiliiout their younger brother, 
H.-iijaniin. That demand almost broke 
the heart of old Jacob and ht- didn't 
allow them to go for a stoond supply 
till tliey could not get along without 
It. Then he reproachi-d them and 
urged tht-m to go without the lad but 
Judali pledg»'d liimself and his own 
childi.>n fi»r his safety and they went 
again taking back the money they had 
so "Strangely biought home in the 
moutlis of their sacks and extra money 
for the second supply. The money was 
not coined l.s is ourrt hut wa-s weighed 
out. On arriving in Egypt they re- 
ported at headquarters and an official 
took them to Joseph's hou.'^e and in- 
formed them they were to eat there 
that day. That alarmed them. 



THE LE.SSOM. 

1. 
The Brotlicrs Meet the Steward. 18-2."!. 

'And the men were afraid, becau-so 
they were brought to Joseph's house; 
and they said. Because of the money 
that was returned in our sacks at the 
tlrst time are we brought in; that he 
mav seek occasion again.st us, and fall 
upon U.S. and take us for bondmen, and 
our asses. And they 
steward of Joseph's 
spake unto him at 
house. And he said, 
fear not; your God. 
your 
vour 



came near to the 
house, and they 
the door of the 
Peace be to you. 
and the God of 
father, hath given you treasure in 
sack.-<; I had your money. And he 
brought Simeon out unto them. And 
the man brought the men into Joseph's 
house, and gave them water, and they 
wash^'d their feet; and he gave their 
as.<es provender. And th-^y made ready 
th-=» prt sent against Joseph's coming at 
no-»n; for they heard that they should 
eat br»'ad there." 

1. FP".\U. — They "were afraid" when 
they wer*' taken to Joseph's liouse. be- 
cause their consciences had perhaps al- 
wavs been in an active state and they 
could not fail to think there was some 
co!ine:*tlon between their treatment of 
Jo.seph and by him. "The thief doth 
fear each bush an officer." ''The flend 
In his own bosoin peoples air with kin- 
dr^'d fiends that hunt him to despair." 
Adam hid when he did wrong.. The 
thought tiiat tiiey might be punished 
for taking away the money was only 
the occasion not the cause of their 
fear Now that they are brought to 
the house of the ruler Instead of to the 
business headijuarters their fears grew. 
To be Invltfd to dine with the ruler 
might mean a plan to make their suf- 
fsring.s all th'^ more severe, as Oriental 
de.spots often showed special mercy to 



brought pres- 

them a little 

as comforting 

could find out 

was a terrible 

hope. It was 

Joseph and it 

effects. They 

and tested. 



thtlr victims only to make the perse- 
cutions the more acute. 

2. PEACE. — The steward relieved 
them in part by telling he had played 
the trick of ptitting their money In 
their sacks. The release of Simeon 
was further relief. The attentions paid 
them with water for their feet and 
food "for their asses, might allay fears 
but might not. The presents they 
brought, as everybody 
ents to a ruler, gave 
hope. Everything was 
as it could be till they 
what it all meant. It 
state of suspense and 
superbly arranged by 
was having its desired 
were being disciplined 
II. 
They Meet Joaepli. 26-31. 

'Wnd when Joseph came home, they 
brought him the present which was in 
their hand into the house, and bowed 
down themselves to him to the earth 
\nd he asked them of their welfare, and 
said Is your father well, the old man of 
whom ye spake? Is he yet alive? And 
th. V said said. Thy servant our father i.s 
well, he is yet alive. And they bowed 
the head, and made obeisance. And he 
lifted up his eves, and saw Benjamin, 
his brother, his mother's son, and said 
Is this your youngest brother, of 
whom ye spake unto me? And he 
God be gracious unto thee, my 
And Joseph made haste; for 
yearned over his brother; 
.sought where to weep; and 
Into his chamber, and wept 



said, 
son. 
his heart 
and he 
he entered 
there. And 
he washed his face, and came out; and 
he refrained himself, and said. Set on 
bread." 

1 KINDNESS. — His Interest In their 
old' father, of whom he Inquires with 
Oriental minuteness, still puzzles them. 
We know how he was feeling but they 
didn't To be guests in his house, to 
be invited to a special feast and to 
be asked in such a kindly manner 
about their father was so different 
from the treatment he »iad given them 
In accusing them of being spies and 
keeping Simeon and requiring ttiem to 
return with Benjamin, they could not 
fall to be still afraid. 

•> LOVE.— The sight of his little 
brother with whom he used to walk 
when the latter was only 3 years old. 
the son of his own mother. Rachel, 
was too much for Joseph. The emo- 
tions long pent up In the strange 
and now by his efforts to 
brothers and see how they 
their father and their young 
er, welled up in an 
that threatened to 
veal his identity 
carried out his 



try 
felt 



land 

out his 

toward 

broth- 

uncontroUahle tide 

overflow and re- 

before he had fully 

plans. They didn't 

sudden- 



pecially of Benjamin. It jvas the most 
natural thing in the world that he 
would give way in private and have to 
wash and straighten up before return- 
ing. 

HI. 
The Mysterloua Fea.st. 32-34. 
"And they set on for him by him- 
self, and for them by themselves, and 
for the Egyptians, tiiat did eat with 
him. by themselves; because the Egyp- 
tians might noL eat bread with the 
Hebrews; for that is an abomination 
unto the Egyptians. And they sat be- 
fore him, the first-born according to 
his birthright, and the youngest ac- 
cording to his youth; and the men 
marvelled one with another. And ho 
took and sent messes unto them from 
before him; but Benjamin's mess was 
five times so much as any of theirs. 
And they drank, and were merry with 
him. 

1. ORDER, — They didn't know how 
a stranger could seat them In the 
order of their ages. That puzzled them 
more. No Egyptian could eat with a 
Jew or such a foreigner without cere- 
monial degradation, just as a strict 
Mohammedan cannot eat and dr'nk 
with Christians, nor a Hindu of one 
caste with one of another caste. For 
that reason Joseph ate apart; also 
because of his rank. In fact It was 
a condescension in him to eat In the 
same room with them and must have 
surprised even those who knew his 
fraternal and democratic spirit 

2. HONOR.— They had a double 
honor in being feasted In the same 
room with him and in having special 
portions, such as were always given to 
a distinguished guest. It was a spe- 
cial honor to Benjamin because he was 
given the amount usually given to a 
king, "five times" as much as the rest. 
The honor bestowed on Benjamin was 
both an expression of Joseph's supe- 
rior love for him and it was a test of 
the others. He was trying by every 
means to get a line on those fellows. 
It would be very foolish in him to 
treat them In a way to cultivate their 
selfishness and cruelty. He must first 
find out what their spirit is. If they 
show no resentment toward him or 
Benjamin for this special honor it will 
be a good sign. They endured the test 
all right. 



N.M.D.A.AT 
HINCKLEY 

■■ ■! ■ ■ ■ !■■ 

Tentative Program for De- 
velopment Meeting June 
5 and 6 Announced. 



plifled in the new code. This instruc- 
tion will be given by Lieut. F. B. 
Smith, battalion quartermaster and 
commissary of the Third regiment. He 
has been detailed to meet with the men 
at regular intervals for the purpose 
of teaching them the new code. 



MANIAC MURDERS 
FIVE ROOM MATES 



posit found the body. Death was due 
to heart disease, according to the cor- 
oner. 

Mr. Hubbard was born in 1844 at 
Elgin, 111. He entered the New York 
office of the American Missionary as- 
sociation In 1873, and six years later 
became Its treasurer. 



Policy of Association 
the Future to Be 
Outlined. 



for 



know why he left the room so 
ly but must have detected some un- 
usual feelings in him. We can Im- 
agine the thoughts of them all, es- 



Just Now 
Your 



i.s being prepared, whether you 
not, for the success or failure 
him in manhood. 



realize it or 
that awaits 



Do you 
success? 



want to improve his chances for 



Let him open a savings account at the 
First National Bank. Keep in touch with 
his progre.ss as a money saver, thus helping 
him to acquire the financial experience 
which will be the foundation of success in 
his business career. 



■WTl.\T THE MASTERS SAY. 

"U'e all recognize the dangers of an 
emotional religion, but there are al- 
most equally great dangers In a re- 
ligion from which all emotion Is en« 
tirely banished. A perfectly dry eye 16 
blind and a perfectly dry religion has 
no sight. You always have the clear- 
est vision when there is some moisture 
in the air and a personal sentiment has 
Its appointed place In the vision of 
God. — Jowett. 

A man Is no richer or happier than 
his good opinion of other men. I have in 
mind a man who receives a salary of 
$5,000 or $6,000 a year, and has hun- 
dreds of men under him. He lives in 
a lovely home, in the most beautiful 
surroundings, and has a most lovable 
woman for his wife, and a darling 
child. He saves a large part of his In- 
come, has some good Investments, and 
Is voung enough to become a wealthy 
man before he dies, for he has great 
ability. But he Is one of the poorest 
and least to be envied of all the men 
I know, because he suspects everyone 
with whom he has dealings of mean 
motives, and is continually embroiled 
in petty quarrels. Even if he is ob- 
livious to the contempt in which the 
community is coming to hold him, he is 
because of the low estimate he 
on his neighbors. — Cowan. 



poor 
puts 



1. 



PERTINENT QirESTlONS. 

How does consilience so trouble 



us : 



How does not forgiveness con 
firm men in their sins? 

3. Whv was Joseph Justified in 
ing his brothers so thoroughly? 

4. How was It just In Joseph 
show them such mercy? 

5. Had those men really repented 
of their sin against him? 



test- 



to 



First National Bank 

of Dulutli. 
Capital and Surplus $2,000,000 



ANTHONY COMSTOCK 

ME ETS R EVERSAL. 

New York, May 22.— Chief City Mag- 
istrate Mc.\doo has refused to put a 
ban on picture postcards Illustrating 
the turkey trot. He discharged a 
postcard dealer brought before him by 
Postofflce Inspector Anthony Comstock 
and advised Mr. Comstock If he con- 
sidered the dance Itself unlawful, to 
direct his attention to some of the 
"fashionable places" where it was 
danced. 




Money-Save Your Teeth! 

SAVE PAIN = 

Duluth's Largest Dental Office Is Located at 

317 VfEST SUPERIOR STREET 

This office was established in 1910, and by fair dealings, honest methods and kind treat- 
ment, we have built up the largest dental business in Northern Minnesota. Pay less than we ask 
and you get less for your money. Pay more and you pay to9 much. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED lO YEARS 

Gold Crowns J^^^Jt^^*^ at ''any prlce^3,00 



\ 



M ■ I Uf I ^'^^t f'^r weight, t>eau- jia AM 

Bridfi!8 ffOrk ^^ ^"^^ quaUty has SSiDD 

WIIHg«^ ■¥«»■■* „,3ver been excelled. .. ""■*'*' 

AVe npecla|lK«> in gold InW 

UNION PAINLESS DENTISTS, 



Silver Fillings '::Z ^^.^L^LMfi 
Whalebone Plahsl'r'"''"*"" $5.00 



n gold Inln.vM, k<>I(I nnd 



and. 
nlunilouiii platen. 

Dr. Franklin Greer & Co., 
317 WKST SUPERIOR ST., 



OwTior.^. 
DULUTH. 



The tentative program for the sev- 
enth semi-annual convention of the 
Northern Minnesota Development as- 
sociation at Hinckley June 5 and 6 
was announced today jy Secretary W. 
R. Mackenzie. 

The program deals principally with 
development, each address on the pro- 
gram being related to that general 
subject. The speakers are all prac- 
tical men, haviug an .ntimate knowl- 
edge of their subjects, and those who 
attend the conventloi should obtain 
new information and 
development work. 



inspiration in 



'What ShaU Our Eflorts for 1913-14 
Be Directed to?" the program asks, 
and it answers the questio^n by refer- 
ring to three subjects, good roads, im- 
migration, public domain. 

The Pine County I'evelopment as- 
sociation and the Con meroial club of 
Hinckley has made arrangements for 
the entertainment of the guests. The 
hotel accommodations will be ample 
and the visitors '^111 be well cared 
for. Most of the time will be given 
over to the business o\ the convention, 
but on Thursday evening, June 5, the 
delegates will be the guests of the 
Pine County Developrient association 
at a social session at Patrick's hall. 
The tentative progrim for tlie two 
days' session follows: 
Prayer. .. .Rev. Q. Peterson. Hinckley 

Address of welcome 

Robert H. Keyes, president Hinckley 
Commercial club. 

Response 

Cyrus M. King, Deer River, president 

isf: M. D. A. 
Appointment of committees on creden- 
tials and resolutions. 
Address .."A Minneso.a Development" 
Joseph H. Chapman, vice president 
Northwestern National bank, Minne- 
apolis. 
Address. . ."AgrlculturE.l Organization" 
A. F. Wood.s. dean and director de- 
partment of agriculture, U. of M. 
Address. .. ."The Legiiilature of 1913" 

Address "Farm Developmentf' 

K. Johnson, Dassel, secretary Farmers 

Corporation. 
Address — "The State Fair and Its 

Relation to Agriculture" 

John J. Furlong. Austin. president 

Minnesota State Agriculture society. 
Address — "Why the Development As- 
sociation Appeals to a Cass County 

Farmer" 

B. L. Perry, Backus. 

\ddress "Agricultural Financing" 

J W. Wheeler, St. I'aul, president 
Capital Trust company. 
Address — "Growing Tilings in the 

Island of Tahiti" 

Stafford King, University of Minne- 
sota. 
Address — "How the County Work in 
the West Central Counties is De- 
veloping" • • ^ 

B C. Hlgbie, Morris, superintendent 
"west Central School of Agricul- 
ture.. U. of M.. and necretary West 
Central Development association. 

Address ;••••••• 

Thomas P. Cooper, Fargo, N. D., sec- 
retary and director Better Farming 
association of North Dakota. 
Address — "The Revolving Fund Con- 
stitutional Amendmf nt" 

C. H. Warner, Aitkin. Representative 
Fifty-aecotid district. 

YfiWKEYlStftTE 

IS CLOSED UP 



Intnate of Idaho Asylum 

Crushes Men's Heads 

With Table. 

Blackfoot. Idaho. May 22.— Peter 
Bradovltch, an Insane Austrian con- 
fined In the Southern Idaho insane 
asylum here, killed his five room 
mates by beating them over the head 
witii a table as they lay asleep yes- 
terday. The dead: 

GEORGE RACE, Pocatello. 

GEORGE PEDE, Boise. 

HYRUM PATTERSON, Idaho Falls. 

ELIAS BAGLEY. Moreland. 

GEORGE SHEPHERD, Pocatello. 

There was no evidence of a struggle 
between the maniao and his victims, 
except on tlie body of Patterson. Two 
bruises on his arm showed that he 
had tried to ward olf the blows which 
Bradovltch was raining on his head. 

So quietly did Bradovltch accom- 
plish the killing that guards sleeping 
across the hall were not awakened. 
The heads of all five men were com- 
pletely crushed. 

Bradovltch was committed to the 
insane asylum two years ago from the 
state penitentiary, where he was serv- 
ing a life sentence for murder. 

SHA W REN IGS. 

Former Cabinet Officer Doesn't Want 
to Buy Railroad. 

Atlantic. Iowa. May 22.— Leslie M. 
Shaw, former secretary of the treas- 
ury of the United States, whose bid 
of $294,000 for the Atlantic, Northern 
& Southern railroad was accepted by 
the United States district court last 
Friday, announced yesterday that he 
had Instructed his attorney by tele- 
graph not to bid on the property, and 
began efforts to stop payment on the 
certified check for $14,700, put up as 
a forfeit with the bid. 

Shaw's attorney. J. J. Hess, declares 
the telegram was not received until 
after the sale had been completed. 

Judge Thomas Arthur, whose court 
has had charge of the road for some 
lime, set June 2 as the date of resale 
if Shaw succeeds in repudiating his 

Receiver E. S. Harlan, who has man- 
aged the road for more than a year, 
resigned, but Judge Arthur refused to 
discharge him pending an investiga- 
tion of charges of misapplication of 
funds of the company. Freeman Reed 
was appointed to make an Investiga- 
tion of the receivers' books and rec- 
ords. 

MRS. MOORE HEADS 
COND UCTOR S' WIVES. 

Detroit, Mich., May 22. — Mrs. J. H. 
Moore of Toledo. Ohio, was elected 
president of the Ladies Auxiliary to 
the Order of Railway Conductors at 
the final session of the convention, 
which has been in session here since 
May 10. Indications were that the 
conductors would not conclude their 
sessions until next Tuesday. 

DIES IN SAFETY 

D EPOS IT BOOTH. 

New York, May 22. — Henry Wright 
Hubbard for thirty-four years treas- 
urer of the American Missionary as- 
sociation, was found dead last night 
In a private booth in the offices of a 
downtown tafety deposit company. 
Following his dally custom. Mr. Hub- 
bard went to the safety deposit offices 
shortly before closing time. A clerk 
who was waiting to receive his de- 



FATHER OF 36. 

Man Who Saw Lincoln Shot Dies in 
New Mexico. 

Albuquerque, N. M.. May 22. — Col. 
Francisco Perea. delegate from New 
Mexico to the thirty-eighth congress 
and a delegate to the Republican na- 
tional convention at Baltimore In 1864, 
whicli re-nominated Abraham Lincoln 
for president, died at hie home here 
yesterday, at the age of 83 years. 

Col. Perea was present at Ford's 
theater the night Lincoln was shot, 
occupying a seat in the orchestra just 
below the president's box. He was 
the father of thirty-six children, be- 
ing twice married and each wife bear- 
ing eighteen children. At the out- 
break of the Civil war he was soon 
made a lieutenant colonel by Governor 
Connelly and served throughout the 
war. He was a descendant of one of 
the oldest Spanish families In New 
Mexico. 



KILLS FRIEND OF 

DIVORC ED WIFE. 

Joplin, Mo., May 22. — After John 
Thralls, a miner, shot and killed Ed- 
ward Skelton. a Republican politician, 
in the latter's store here last night, a 
mob of several hundred men formed 
and threatened to lynch the slayer. 
After arresting Thralls the police 
secreted him for a time in an alley, and 
later he was taken to the Jail at Carth- 

^Believing that the prisoner had been 
taken to police headquarters, the mob 
gathered there, but the men dispersed 
when they learned of the ruse by which 
they had been baffled. 

Thralls charged Skelton with being 
attentive to Mrs. Thralls, who was di- 
vorced from her husband three years 
I ago. This charge led to the shooting. 

KILLED DEFENDING 

H ER SM ALL SON. 

Washington, Kan., May 22. — Mat Sny- 
der, a young farmer, slashed his wife 
to death with a razor and then at- 
tempted suicide with the same 
weapon. 

Snyder took his 4-year-old son with 
him to "gather the eggs" in the Sny- 
der barn. Fearing he might harm the 
child. Mrs. Snyder followed them to the 
haymow. When she saw her husband 
draw a razor she grasped his arm. 
Snyder knocked the woman down with 
a pitchfork, slashed her to death with 
a razor and then opened the veins of 
his wrist and cut his own throat. The 
child was unharmed. 

Snyder was reputed to be wealthy. 
Before becoming unconscious he told 
his physicians the hiding place of 
$2,000 in the cellar of his home. The 
money was found as described. 

FREEMAN OUT OlT 

$150.000 BAIL. 

New York, May 22. — Albert Freeman, 
convicted with Julian Hawthorne and 
others of using the malls to defraud 
Investors, has been released In $150,000 
bail, pending appeal. He Is under a 
five-year sentence and had been in jail 
since his conviction on March 14. Loyal 
friends gathered in court recently and 
supplied the funds and securities for 
his bond. 



Open from 8tSO a. m. to 7 ri. 



■ oBdaxM. !• t« 1. 



Probate Court Disposes of 

Property Valued at 

$6,000,000. 

Final accounting wis made in pro- 
bate court yesterday in the estate of 
William C. Tawkey, Detroit millionaire, 
who owned Interests In mining proper- 
ties on the Mesaba Iron range which 
have been valued at $6,069,160. 

Under the will, the estate is to be 
divided between a san, William H. 
Yawkey. one of the owners of the De- 
troit baseball club, and a daughter. 
Augusta L. Austin, his only heirs. There 
are also a number of bequests to rela- 
tives servants. charlt.ible Institutions, 
etc.. amounting to about $60,000. 

The holdings of the Y^awkey estate 
In St Louis county. Included fee Inter- 
ests In the Ruddy. Kellogg. Y'awkey, 
Commodore. Schley, Larkln and Alpe- 
na mines. Including the Minnesota 
holdings, the estate has been valued at 
about $20. 000.000. 

NEW SIGNAL'CODE 

FOR NATIONAL GUARD. 

When the annual encampment of the 
Third Regiment, M. N. O.. Is held at 
Camp Lakeview near Lake City. June 
lfi-25. the improved continental code of 
field signal wofk. which has been 
adopted by Ithe war department, will 
be used Instfc*id of the old Meyer code 
which has been In vsgue for years. 

Between now nnd the time for en- 
campment, local militiamen will be In- 
structed in the signal work as exem- 



PUTS LID ON SISSON. 

President Talks With Him About 
Speech on Japanese. 

Washington. May 22. — President Wil- 
son sent for Representative Sisson of 
Mississippi yesterday and urged him 
not to make any speech that would of- 
fend the sensibilities of Japan. 

Mr. Sisson. w^ho recently made a 
"war speech," had given notice of his 




E invite the business of Companies 
and Individuals who appreciate 
conservative banking. 



Cbe €ity national Bank 

DULUTH 
SCI^I^WOOD BUILDING 



WHEW YOU NEED TO STORE GOODS 

When you intend leaving the city for a time— when your fu- 
ture plans arc uncertain — when you contemplate changing your 
quarters and haven't decided just where to locate— when you have 
articles not in use and in the way — then is the time our furniture 
storage department can serve you best. ^ 

DULUTH VAN & STORAGE CO 

18 FOURTH AVENUE WEST. 



intention to speak In the house Fri- 
day on the legal phases of the Japa- 
nese alien land question. He had a 
twenty-minute conference with the 
president, during which, however, he 
assured Mr. Wilson that he would not 
discuss the pending negotiations or 
touch on anything of Incendiary char- 
acter, limiting himself to an argument 
on alien land ownership. 

It Is Indicated at the White House 
that the American note just sent and 
the tenor of future exchanges will be 
to assure Japan that the majority of 
Americans have a genuine respect and 
admiration for the achievements and 
character of her people. 

STRATTON TAKEN 

T O ROC K ISLAND. 

Pekin, 111., May 22. — Clyde Stratton. 

notorious safe robber, who made a 
sensational e.scape from the Federal 
penitentiary at Leavenworth, Kan., last 
March, by crawling through an eigh- 
teen-lnch sewer for half a mile, has 
been taken to Rock Island, 111., to 
answer to an indictment charging him 
with the murder of Cashier Crowder 
of the Silvls, 111., National bank, which 
was robbed last December. - 



"^•1 



.At 



IfALLS V TMt YttLOWSTONt 



First 






.menca 



YELLOWSTONE 
PARK, PUGET 
SOUND. 

COLUMBIA RIVER 
COUNTRY 

Personally conducted 
excursions to and 
through Yellowstone 
Park from St. Paul 
and Minneapolis each 
week. Make reser- 
vations early. 
Here is the trip of a life 
time --- change of scene, 
change of climate, pure w^a- 
ter, good food, sumptuous 
hoteIs---and unique expe- 
riences to be enjoyed no- 
where else save in Amer- 
ica's Only Geyserland. 

Very Low Fares 

For Yellowstone Park and 
Pacific Coast trips. The 
Northern Pacific is the di- 
rect and only line to Gar- 
diner Gateway ---original 
and northern entrance to 
Yellowstone Park. 
Through sleeping cars daily during 
season ^June 15 to Sept. 15) 
direct to Gardiner Gateway. 
'Route of the Great Big Baked 
Potato •' 

Ask for literature and full Infor- 
mation. Call on or address 

C. P. O'DOVNELL, C. P. A.; 

334 We«i Superior Street, 

DULUTH, MINN. 

W. H. MITCHELL, .\ftent; 
920 Tower .\ venue, 
SUPERIOR, WIS. 

Northern 
Pacific Ry 

PicturttQu* nnd Historic RauU to 
Panama-PadM Hxpo.. Sm trancuco JVli 




THE PURPOSE 



"Th€ pnrpote of « Joamey 
ia not only to arrioe at the 
goal, hut to find enjoyment on 
th» trail " —Henry Van Dyk*. 

Th»t df»arlh»i the White SUr 
Poralolon Okuadlan R*rTlce t^y 
th* iilotureiwjiia. Ikiid h>oked Ht 
Lawrenc* rout* to toropc. 

SAIUNGS TUESDAYS 

From Montr— 1 St Quebec 

• T TBI 

Larocsl faaadlan Ltacrs 

A*k the naarmt Ae*nt 
Ft Fartieulara 

WHmrrpo.nnwmioiB 

LINE MINNEAPOUS 



t' 



mmf~ 



«.^-, 




Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 22, 1913. 



NEWS OF THE NORTHWEST 



ELDRED MAN 
LOSES^ BRIDE 

Weds a Crookston Girl 

Against Mother's Wishes, 

Separation Resulting. 



When Couple Seek Parental 

Blessing They Are Cruelly 

Pulled Apart. 



Crookston, Minn., May 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — To be wed at 2 p. m., 
be persuaded to take his bride to her 
home for the parental blessing and 
th* re have her torn from him and re- 
ceive a greeting from his mother-in- 
law in the form of an attempt to 
throttle him, and finally to be denied 
the privilege to enttr his bride's home 
at all while she was retained there 
was among the wedding surprises 
faced by Robert H, Jackson, who de- 
parted for Eldred last evening without 
his bride. 

"I will allow her to remain home a 
few days, ' said Mr. Jackson last eve- 
ning, "and ihen 1 will return and 
claim her, peaceably if possible, and, 
if not any way I can gel her. She is 
mine; I love her and she loves me. I 
regrt-t there should be trouble, but 
nothing can keep us apart." 

Mr. Jackson had attempted to induce 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wallace of iJiis 
city to consent to his marriage to their 
daughter, Annie Janet Wallace, but 
Mrs. Wallace objected to her daughter 
marrying outside- Iht Catholic church. 
The two were determined to wed and 
yesterday afternoon they walked to 
the office of Clerk of the Court 
Waage, secured a license and crossing 
the court house hall had Probate Judge 
llovland tie the knot. 

Mrs. Wallace heard rumors of the 
affair and .sent a scouting party after 
the couple and the residence of Father 
Wurm was watched and while the 
watchers were there the happy couple 
walked down from the court house 
husband and wife. 

They Were finally persuaded not to 
depart for Eldred where Mr. Wallace 
Is in charge of an 800 acre farm, and 
he dismissed the automobile he had 
hired for the get-away and the two 
proceeded toward.*; the Wallace home. 
Mutber Separates Couple. 

Before they reached it Mrs. Wallace 
spied them and bore down on the luck- 
less Jackson, tore his bride from him, 
hustled her home and after attempting 
to choke hinn and giving him a few 
sidelights regarding himself he had 
never heard before entered her home 
and slammed the uoor in the face of 
the crestfallen Lothario. 

Jackson consulted an attorney, who 
went to Judge Gossman to get out a 
writ of habeas corpus, but the judge 
being a close friend of the Wallace 
family persuaded Jackson to delay ac- 
tion. Tnrough the strategy of friends 
Mrs. Jackson met her husband at the 



liome of a neiglibor fur u few niiiuites, 
about 10 o'clock last evening and they 
agreed that she should remain with 
her mother, who was still suffering 
from hysterics, for a day or two, when 
he will claim her, and if necessary 
bring the militia from Eldred to en- 
force his right to liis bride. The bride 
Is of age, being Just past 21. The af- 
fair caused a big sensation. 



BACK AT REFOR MATORY. 

Parole Breaker Returns All the Way 
From Seattle Alone. 

St. Cloud, Minn., May 22. — Coming 
voluntarily and alone from Seattle. 
Wash., to St. Cloud to give himself up 
to the authorities of the reformatory, 
Adolph Bennewitz has returned to the 
institution. Bennewitz liad been out 
about a year and hud broken parole. 
He went lo Seattle, wliere he has rela- 
tives and there his father and sister 
induced him to come back. 

Bennewitz said he wanted to do the 
riglit thing and thereby remove the 
stain, as far as possible, from his 
name. He said that he was ready to 
agrain resume his service. He was 
placed at work in the field and is a 
trusty. 

Bennftwltz had served three and a 
half years in the reformatory and had 
been paroled about a year ago. After 
being cut about four months he broke 
parole and went West. It is likely 
lliut he will be paroled again when the 
board has been satisfied as to his inten- 
tions. 



the adoption of brewery methods in 
the handling of milk. The pasteuriz- 
ing system adopted by the breweries, 
and the use or the metal cap. were 
urged by Dr. Hall as the proper solu- 
tion of the milk question. He spoke 
on "Milk and the Public Health." 

Pasteurizing and the use of the 
metal top and bottling on the farm 
would not only mean inu( h to the pub- 
lic health, but milk so treated would 
keep for two weeks in good condition, 
he asserted. 

The successful treatment of appendi- 
citis and the use of horse serum as a 
cure for certain diseases were also 
discus.sed yesterday. Dr. L. G. Wilber- 
ton of Winona read a paper on tiie 
treatment of appendicitis, and Dr. B. 
H. Ogden of St. Paul discussed the use 
of serums. 

About 100 doctors from all parts of 
the state were present. 

FORMER BAUDETTE 
OFFICIALS SUED 



COL KEL LY PR ESIDENT. 

Devils Lake Man Heads Company to 
Take Over Interurban Railway. 

Devils. Lake. N. D., May 22.— The 
company formed to take over the In- 
terurban railway to the Chautauqua 

grounds ha.«i organized as follows: 

President, Col. Joseph M. Kelly; vice 
president, J. M. Thompson; secretary, 
H. J. Kenner; treasurer, Ole Serum- 
gard; general manager, C. A. Stotlar. 

The work of reconstructing the rail- 
way will be started at once. Accord- 
ing to the present program the track 
will be brought up to the Great North- 
ern tracks, placing the Chautauqua de- 
pot opposite Kelly avenue. 

In the meantime the matter of a via- 
duct and other features will be taken 
up with the Great Northern railway. A 
committee will make the trip to the 
general offices very slv>''tly. 

One-half of the subscription amounts 
will be collected at once and work will 
be put under way immediately on per- 
manent improvement. 



HONOR SLAYTON MAN. 

Dr. Williams Elected Head of State 
Homeopathic institute. 

St. Paul. Minn.. May 22. — Dr. A. L. 

Williams of Slayton, Minn., was elect- 
ed president of the state homeopathic 
institute at the annua] convention 
here last night. Other officers were 
named as follows: 

Dr. A. G. Ahrens, St. Paul vice 
president; Dr. G. R. Machan, Allnne- 
apolis, second vice president; Dr. 
Ethel E. Hurd, Minneapolis, secretary 
(re-elected); Dr. Margaret Koch, Min- 
neapolis, treasurer (re-elected). 

"What Is good for the breweries Is 
good for the babies," declared Dr. P. 
M. Hall of Minneapolis In advocating 




TkcDoctor^ 



The questions answered below are 

feneral in character; the symptoms or 
iseases are given and the answers will 
apply to any case of similar nature. 

Those wishing further advice, free, 
may address Dr. Lewis Baker, College 
Bldg., College-Ellwood Sts., Dayton, 
Ohio, enclosing self-addressed, stamped 
envelope for reply. Full name and 
address must be given but only Ini- 
tials or fictitious name will be used in 
my answers. The prescriptions can be 
filled at any well-stocked drug store. 
Any druggist can order of wholesaler. 



Elizabeth says; "I am troubled with 
a constant headache which also affects 
my eyes. My breath is awful, as I have 
a severe case of catarrh of the head 
and throat." 

Answer: I receive daily hundreds of 
letters from people who have suffered, 
as you do and who have been cured 
with the following prescription: Make 
a wash by mixing one-hair teaspoonful 
of Viiane powder, which you can pur- 
chase from any druggist in 2-oz pack- 
ages, and add to this one pint of warm 
water, use this In the nostrils daily 
to thoroughly cleanse them. A ca- 
tarrh balm should be used with this. 
This is made by mixing one teaspoon- 
ful of Viiane powder with one ounce 
of lard or vaseline and apply well up 
Into the nostrils twice a day. If this 
Is used daily your catarrh will soon 
vanish. It should, however, be used 
occaslonlly to prevent a return of the 
disease. 

• * • 

"C G." writes: "If you know of any- 
thing that will cure dandruff, itching 
scalp and premature baldness, please 
let me know what it is." 

Answ^er: For several years I have 
prescribed plain yellow mlnyol as su- 
perior to anything known for the treat- 
ment of diseased scalp. Get it in four- 
ounce jars with full directions. It 
quickly overcomes all disease? of hair 
and scalp and gives new vigor and in- 
tense natural color to the hair. Try 
It fairly and you will advocate its use 
for your friends. 

• « • 

"Mildred" wrjtes: "I am constantly 
embarrassed because of the fact u\ my 
extreme thinness. T have absolutely 
no color In my face or lips and I am 
dull and lifeless most of the time. 
Please advise me what to do." 

Answer: If you are so thin and pale 
and your lips and cheeks colorless it 
is because your blood Is deficient In 
red corpuscles. This can be easily 
overcome by the use of three-grain 
hypo-nuclane tablets, which can be had 
from anv druggist In sealed cartons 
w^ith full directions for taking. When 
the blood is enriched by the use of 
these tablets your weipht will Increase, 
tbe color will pome back Into your 
face and lips, and it will improve your 
general system so that you will be- 
come strong and healthy. 

• * • 

"Edna" writes: "T suffer with rheu- 
matism all the timp and I shall be verv 
plad If you can tell me something to 
relieve me." 

Answer: I ran give you a pre.«crip- 
tlon which will not only relieve, but 
will cure your rheumatism. This Is 
my favorte remedy and from the num- 
ber of letters received from people who 
have used it proves its value In curing 
rheumatism. The following is made by 
mixing well, taking a teaspoonful at 
meal times and again before retiring: 
Comp. essence cardiol, 1 oz. ; comp. 
fluid balmwort, 1 oz. ; syrup sarsapa- ) 



rllla comp., 5 ozs. : iodide of potassium, 
2 drams; wine of colchlcum, one-half 
ounce; sodium salicvlate 4 drams. 

"Morris" asks: "I have suffered with 
a chronic cough for almost a year, and 
catch a fresli cold every few weeks. 
Nothing the doctor gives me helps, so 
I write to you." 

Answer: Tou need a thorough lax- 
ative cough syrup, one that not only 
relieves but surely drives it from the 
system. The following regularly used 
will cure any curable cough or cold 
promptly. Obtain a 2*/^ oz. bottle of 
essence mentho-laxene, mix it with a 
home-made sugar syrup or honey as 
per directions on bottle. 

• * • 

"Anxious B." writes: "I have in re- 
cent years been threatened with appen- 
dicitis, but would never consent to an 
operation. Indigestion, constipation 
and sedentary habits cause me much 
suffering. Kindly prescribe for dys- 
pepsia sompthing which you think will 
cure me and prevent appendicitis." 

Answer: The most scientific and 
satisfying treatment for your trouble 
is tablets trio-peptine: packed pink, 
white and blue in sealed cartons with 
full directions. All stomach disorders 
can be conquered by regular treatment. 

• * • 

"Nervous M." writes: 'Xoss of sleep, 
nervousness, loss of appetite and over- 
work have made almost a complete 
wreck of me. I have to work, but can 
scarcely drag one foot after the other. 
Please advise." 

Answer: The condition you describe 
Is prevalent especially with brain 
workers. Use the following: Com- 
pound syrup of hypophosphltes, 5 ozs.: 
tincture cadomene, 1 oz. Mix, shake 
well and take a teaspoonful before 
meals. 

• * • 

Farmer's Wife asks: "Will you plea.9e 
tell me how to overcome obesity?" 

Answer: Obesity Is burdensome. Ex- 
cessive fat on the human body Is un- 
natural and frequently results seri- 
ously. The best and safegt method to 
reduce Is to take regularly .^-grain ar- 
bolene tablets. They are put up In 
sealed tubes with directions for home 
use. and any well-stocked druggist can 
supply them. 

« • * 

"Sara C." writes: "T am constipated 
and have a ereasv skin. Suffer from 
headache. Indigestion and some kidney- 
trouble. I wish you to recommend a 
remedy." 

Answor: The best remedy to re- 
lieve and cure chronic constipation Is 
called three-grain sulpherb tablets 
made from sulphur, cream of tartar 
and herb medicines. Taken regularly 
the blood W purified, the bowels and 
liver stimulated Into healthy action 
and a cure established. Thev are packed 
In pealed tubes wth full directions. 
Thpse tablets are splendid for children 
as they do not gripe or sicken 

• * • 

"Mamma" — "I know of nothing bet- 
ter for b<^d wetting than: 1 dram of 
tincture cubebs. 2 drams of tincture 
rhus aromatic and 1 oz. comp. fluid 
balmwort. Mix. The dose Is 10 to l.") 
drops In water one hour before m*>als. 

Send 11.00 for Dr. Lewis Baker's 
Book on Health and Beauty. Adv. 



Emil Peterson, Contractor, 

Seeks Big Damages for 

False Arrest. 

Crookston, Minn., May 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — A local attorney has 
brought suit in the state courts aga'.nst 
the village of Baudette council mem- 
bers of 1911 and others for Emil Peter- 
son, a contractor, to recover $24,600 
damages for false arrest. 

C. R. Middleton, who was attorney 
of the village in 1911; Halvor Robestad, 
John Norquist and Gilbert Roan, mem- 
bers of lumber concerns at Roosevelt, 
are also made defendants. 

The members of the 1911 council 
who are defendants are: J. U. Williams, 
who was mayor; George B. Partridge, 
who was clerk, and J. A. Llndsev, 
George Arnold and B. Riley, who were 
trustees. 

Why Peterson Sued. 

The action is the result of the arrest 
of Peterson on a charge of grand lar- 
ceny about two years ago. He was 
the contractor who built the wagon 
bridge across the Baudette river for 
the village at that time, and also the 
dock at the foot of Second street. 
When the work was completed he 
stated that he owed nothing for labor 
or material furnished In the work, and 
he was paid in village orders. Shortly 
afterward Halvor Robestad, represent- 
ing Roosevelt lumber companies, plac- 
ed a Hen on the bridge on the claim 
that Peterson had secured lumber 
from them and had not paid for it. 
Peterson's arrest followed and the case 
came for a preliminary hearing before 
Judge Schmidt, but was dlsmiijsed. This 
was the last heard of the case for 
nearly two years, or until Peterson 
entered suit in the amount named 
above. 

In his claim Peterson alleges that 
he was earning $7,000 a year when he 
was arrested, and that as a result of 
the arrest "he lost most of his business. 
In consequence he asks $14,000. He 
also claims he was arrested and ''m- 
prlsoned for eight days and he asks 
$10,000 for the mental anguish he en- 
dured on this account. He states also 
that he paid $640 In attornye's and 
legal fees and he wants that sum In 
addition to the others. 



la 



The Happy Health Habit 

a is not easy to acquire in Summer when the appetite is 
fickle and the digestive powers are weak. When the 
warm weather calls for a change in diet the surest way 
to get Summer comfort and palate joy is to drop 
heavy meats and starchy vegetables and eat 

Shredded Wheat 

with Strawberries or other Fruit 

a dish that is appetizing, satisfying and easily digested. The crisp, 
well-baked, porous shreds combine naturally with fruit acids, supply- 
ing the maximum of nutriment and keeping the bowels healthy and 

~" active. Delicious for break- 

fast or for any meal* 

Heat one or more Biscuits in the oven to restore 
crispness; then cover 'with berries or other fresh 
fruit; serve with milk or cream and sweeten to 
suit the tsiste. Requires no baking or cooking. 
More nourishing and more healthful than ordi- 
nary shortcake. 

Make Your Meat 
Shredded Wheat 

Made only by The Shredded Wheat Company, Niagara Falls, N.Y. 




SHOES TOO S MALL. 

So Minneapolis Thief Could Not Prove 
Title to Property. 

Minneapolis, Minn., May 22. — It 
Charles Johnson'8 feet had not been 
so large, he wouldn't have gone to the 
workhouse for forty-five days. He 
was arrested on a charge of having 
stolen a pair of shoes from A. Wjlbsky. 

"I bought thoi^e shoes in Duluth a 
year ago,^' he told Judge C. L. Smith. 

"Put them on; let's see If they're 
yours," said the judge. 

Johnson took ofC his shoes and be- 
gan to put on the ones he was charged 
with having stolen. He tugged and 
twisted. Then he spat on his hands 
and took another grip on the shoe 
strap. He stood up and Jumped on the 
floor. The shoe was half on. Then he 
turned to the judge. "I can put 'em 
on. but it will kill me to do It." 

"Forty-five days," said the court 

EXPRES S RAT ES CUT. 

Wisconsin Railroad Commission 
Orders Sweeping Reductions. 

Mad.ison, TVis., May 22. — Changes of 
express rates of sweeping importance 
were ordered yesterday by the Wiscon- 
sin railroad commission in its decision 
in the case brought by the Milwaukee 
Merchants' and Manufacturers' asso- 
ciation. By an order of the commis- 
sion, every express company operating 
in Wisconsin is included in the pur- 
view of the ruling. The average re- 
ductions ordered are about 20 per cent. 

As the order sets no date for Its be- 
coming effective the new rates will go 
into effect twenty days from date as 
provided by law. 

The hundred pounds basing rates be- 
tween points are considerably altered 
and the graduate scales on which the 
charges for the various weights are 
computed are completely changed. 

LOSnTBADLANDS. 

Montanan Is Found Nearly Dead After 
Terrible Experience. 

Aberdeen, S. D., May 22.— When two 
Montana homesteaders read an adver- 
tisement on May 15 in a newspaper 

f^^^l?*? ^o'" information regarding H 
b. Briner. a neighbor who was lost" 
they remembered that on May 1 thev 
had seen an object moving slowly over 
a butte in the Bad L^nds several miles 
from their shacks. They investigated 
and found Briner wandering about lost 
carrying his shoes, which he had re- 
moved from swollen feet and had been 
unable to replace. He had been more 
than a month' without food. 

Briner, who lives near Wibaux. Mont 
has been brought to this city by his 
brother-in-law, D. T. Wegner, to re- 
cuperate from the effects of his expe- 
rience. He now weighs less than 100 
pounds, having fallen of eighty pounds 
during his adventure. 

A heavy rainfall caused a mist In 
the Bad L^nds while Briner was walk- 
ing from Wibaux to his claim, and he 
became lost. He ate a half dozen 
doughnuts and some rolls that he had 
in his pocket, the first day. Thereafter 
and until he was found he had no food 
though fortunately he found water 

The man Is 50 years old. 

COURT AT ATfRlN. 

Aitkin, Minn., May 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The May term of dis- 
trict court opened here Tuesday with 
Judge Wright of Park Rapids presid- 
ing. There are forty-one civil and 
three criminal cases on the calender. 

WALKy HIGH' PLACES. 

Daredevil Italian Furnishes Excite- 
ment in High St. Paul Building. 

St. Paul. Minn., May 22.— "It's a cinch 
to walk these things, why I could do 
a cake walk on them, watch me." 

With this statement as a prelim- 
inary, an unidentified Italian climbed 
over the railing and began to walk 
across the narrow beams tnat span the 
areaway on the fifteenth floor of a 
local business building yest xday. Ilig 



abilities did not 
ard his words ha 
he began to tott« 
the railing. 

He was pulled 
Michaels, elevate 

The man had 
from him by his 
drop. He refused 
the elevator. 



come up to the stand- 
d set for himself, and 
r when ten feet from 

to safety by Nathan 
ir operator. 
Ill the courage taken 
narrow escape from a 

even to ride down in 



NEW FARGO BUILDING. 

Armory-Auditorium Expected to Be 
Completed By Next Fall. 

Fargo, N. D.. May 22. — (Special to 

The Herald.) — The plans for the P^rgo 

armory-auditoriu:Ti, which is expected 

to seat 3,600 peojle, will soon be ready 
and bids will b"3 asked. The struc- 
ture will be completed by fall. It 
will combine an auditorium with a 
large seating capacity and a stage 
large enough to accommodate the big- 
gest theatrical attractions. The first 
floor will be devoted .entirely to the 
militia and will give them a drill room, 
gymnasium, tub and shower baths, of- 
ficers' Quarters and all other armory 
conveniences. It will cost $85,000. 



ARE AFTER POINTERS. 

Eastern Men of Affairs Are inspecting 
Wisconsin University. 

Madison, Wis., ]tfay 22. — The Wiscon- 
sin capital was host last night for a 
party of 120 mer, of affairs of Phila- 
delphia, Baltimore, Pittsburg and Bos- 
ton and their wives, who are here for 

a three days' inspection of the state 
university. The delegation is headed 
by Rudolph BlankettDurg, mayor of 
Philadelphia. 

"We nave come to acquire some 
knowledge of the practical way in 
which education Is served the people 
of Wisconsin," the mayor said. "This 
unlversitv Is prt-emlnent among the 
universities of the Union in its func- 
tions for servinj? the people of the 
whole state. We hope to apply some 
of the lessons of this visit to the col- 
leges of Pennsyh'anla" 

Governor McGovern and President 
Charles Van Hhse of the university 
held a reception In the capitol and 
later the work cf the university was 
reviewed. 



INDIANS CELEBRATE 

CHURCH FESTIVAL. 

Couderav, Wis.. May 22. — ("Special to 
The Herald.) — Several hundred Chip- 
pewa Indians art at Reserve, the In- 
dian village in the Couderay Indian 
reservation, to taite part In the Corpus 
Chrlsti celebration today. 

This is the grfatest i < llglous festi- 
val during the year among the Indians, 
and is under the t.uspices of the Catho- 
lic church. 



§e^ Fir»< L<o««inotiTe. 

Schafer. N. D., May 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — McKenzle county citi- 
zens have celebrated the arrival of the 
first real locomotive in McKenzle 
county. The contractors have had 
dinky engines at work for some time 
hut the first railway engine came 
down from WlllUton on a barge con- 
structed by the contracting company. 
It will be used for heavier work on 
the grading and later on general con- 
struction. 



have been confirmed by the city coun- 
cil: City attorney. J. C. Wood; chief 
of police, Paul Rediker; policeman, 
John Peterson, Frank Jachor, Ole Ar- 
neson; street and water commissioner, 
Victor J. Marin; fire chief. Otto Laux; 
president pro tem, John Durno. 

Negaunee — The following will be 
voted for Saturday for commissioners 
to revise the charter: Commlssloner- 
at-large, Frank A. Bell. Dr. H. W. 
Sheldon, Tom Connor and John W. El- 
liott; ward commissioners. First ward. 
Thomas Gribble; Second ward, George 
J. Haupt; Third ward, Edward C. An- 
thony; Fourth ward, T. M. Wells; and 
Fifth ward, August P. Johnson. 

Marquette — Maryuette friends of 
John A. Beecraft formerly of this city, 
received word tnls week of his mar- 
riage in Aurora, Minn., to Miss Louise 
Quale of that place. Mr. Beecraft is 
now employed at Keewatln and the 
couple will move there. Mr. Beecraft 
resided in Marquette until four or five 
i years ago. 

j Marquette — Neil Harrington, aged 17, 
i lost four fingers of his right hand 
Tuesday while at work at the Mining 
Journal office, where he is employed 
as an apprentice on the day shift. He 
was wiping the press while the ma- 
chine was in motion and placed his 
right hand over tlie edge of the air 
chamber and when the plunger re- 
turned to the chamber, it caught his 
fingers. The plunger fits closely in the 
air chamber. The bones were crushed 
and the flesh torn. 

Ishpeming — W. H. Brooks and L. B. 
Willoughby and their wives, who are 
touring the state in an automobile, 
arrived In Ishpeming Monday. They 
have traveled the entire distance from 
Chicago to the Upper Peninsula in the 
car. 

Houghton — The Odd Fellows' party, 
which will be given at the Amphl- 
drome hall on Saturday evening. May 
23, will consist of a short entertain- 
ment between each dance, until the 
concert is over, and from then on, 
only the dance will be held. 

Calumet — John Andrina of Wolver- 
ine made complaint In Justice Armifs 
court against his four sons, charging 
them with aj^sault and battery. Hec- 
tor, John, Jr., and Julien were each 
fined |25 and costs in lieu of ninety 
days In the county jail. Dominick 
Andrina was fined ?10 and costs. All 
paid their fines. 

Houghton — George Holzman, aged 
38, a native of Houghton, died Tues- 
day at his home here of heart failure. 
He is survived by a brother Frank, his 
mother, Mrs. Frank Holzman, and by 
two sisters, Lena and Catherine. 

Calumet — Members of Company A 
engineers, the Spanish American "war 
veterans and the veteran.'; of the Civil 
war will attend Sacred Heart church 
Sunday. There will be a special mass 
celebrated by Father Bede, a special 
sermon and an Interesting musical 
program Is being planned. 

Houghton — The Epworth League of 
the Methodist Eipscopal church re- 
elected the old officers as follows: 
President, Charles Bartle; first vice 
president, Harry Chappell; second vice 
president, Fred Cox; third vice presi- 
dent, Viola Tregenza; fourth vice 
president, Nettie Nancarrow; organist, 
Katherine Carlyon; secretary, William 
Davey; treasurer, David Shugg. 



MINNESOTA 6RIEFS 



Get BIk CraMimery Checks. 

Ashley. N. D. May 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— Farmers of this vicinity 
have received chi-cks for 18,861 from 
the local creamery. This is the best 
record ever made at this season. It 
Is all the more renarkable because the 
creamery was shit down for changes 
and repairs durln? a part of February 
and March and some patrons shipped to 
outside points. 

• 

Motor UoatM CloMe Call. 

Fond du Lac, Wis., May 22. — Loaded 
with 5,000,000 pike fry from the state 
hatchery at Oshkosh, two motorboats 
after crossing L8.ke Winnebago in a 
terrific gale and one of the roughest 
seas ever known in these waters, be- 
fore daylight yesterday, arrived safely 
at Lakeside park. The boats were in 
command of Burgess Amoi-y and Frank 
lAllier. The fry tonstilullng the year's 
allotment for this end -of the lake, 
would have perished had the boats 
been out another da.v. 

The boats were carried miles out of 
their course by Ihe storm and many 
times were on thi- point of swamping. 



PENINSULA 5RIEFS 



Manlstlque — The following appoint- 
ments made by Mayor MlddlcbrOok 



To The Young 

Expecfanf Mother 

Women of Experience Advlae the Us« 
of Mother's Friend. 

There Is some trepidation in the minda 
of most women in regard to motherhood. 

The longing to pos- 
sess is often contra- 
dicted by the fear of 
distress. 

But there need be 
no euch dread in view 
of the fact that we 
have an effective rem- 
edy in what is known 
as Mother's Friend. 
This is an external application that has a 
wonderful influence and control over the 
muscular tissues of the abdomen. By Its 
daily use the muscles, cords, tendons and 
ligaments all gently expand without the 
slightest strain ; there is no pnin, no nau- 
sea, no nervousness ; what was dreaded as 
a severe physical ordeal becomes a calm, 
serene, Joyful anticipation. 

In almost every community there are 
women who have used Mother's Friend, and 
they are the ones that recovered quickly. 

Mother's Friend is prepared after the 
formula of a ijoted family doctor by the 
Bradfield Regulator Co., 238 Lamar Bldg., 
Atlanta, Ga. Write them for their instruc- 
tive book to expectant mothers. You will 
find Mother's Friend oq ^ale by all drug 
Btores at $1.00 a bottle, 



Crookston — A summer training school 
for teachers wil be held at the state 
agricultural school, at Crookston, be- 
ginning June 18, and closing July 31. 
Special emphasis will be placed upon 
industrial work suited to rural and 
village schools. An exceptionally strong 
faculty has been secured. 

Mankato — Henry Robel, Jr., repre- 
senting the J. B. Nelson Construction 
company, has been in Minneapolis, con- 
ferring with the officers of the Ameri- 
can Amusement company relative to 
the construction of a new theater in 
this city to cost something like H5,000. 

Fergus Falls — Long search for the 
little son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Welgelt of Corliss township, who was 
lost in woods, has proven fruitless and 
all hope of finding him alive has been 
given up. 

St. Cloud — Fire Chief Mapnussen 
has reported on local fires from 1891 
to 1913, showing 1907 was the lightest 
I from the standpoint of fire losses, this 
'amounting to $720. In 1911 there was 
a loss of $50,676 and in 1901 the loss 
was $116,400. 

Rochester — Supt H, A. Johnson of 
the city schools goes to Crookston the 
early part of June, where he will be 
an Instructor In the summer training 
school for teachers at that place which 
begins on June 16. Mr. Johnson will 
devote six weeks to the work 

Red Wing — The thirtieth annual com- 
mencement of the Red Wing semlnarv 
will take place at the seminary chapel, 
Thursday evening. May 29. Judge Al- 
bert Johnson will deliver the com- 
mencement address. 

Brainerd — The Bralnerd Townslte 
company has put on the market the 
new Cuyuna range addnion to Brain- 
erd, consisting of aoproximutely ivO 
acres divided into forty blocks and 
lying east of the found r.v and shops. 

Hastings — Jacob Knoll, for thirty- 
six years an employe of the Milwau- 
kee railroad, stepped on a nail three 
days ago and died Tuesday of lockjaw. 
He was 60 years of age ana leaves three 
sons and five daughters. 

Fergus Falls—The fish car of the 
state game and fish commission came 
from St. Paul Monday afternoon, bring- 
ing ninet.v-six cans of pike fry for dis- 
tribution in the lakes in this locality 
and near Pelican Rapids. 

International Falls — The Catholic la- 
dles' aid society will liold a food sale 
Saturday afternoon and evening, ^lav 
24, at Mrs. Kook's store, 309 Fourth 
avenue. 

Stillwater — The street car company 
will build at Wildwoc»i this sei'.son. an 
addition of 60 by 55 feet, to Increase 
the size of the kitchen and cafe. And 
another attraction will be an electric 
theater, shewing moving pictures both 
afternoon and evening. 

Moorhead — On Tuesday Rustad dedi- 
cated, with appropriate ceremonies, its 
fine new consolidated school building 
wnlch wa.s recently complerod by C'^r - 
tractor Nels Melvey upon plans sub- 
mitted by the state department. "Jov- 
<rnor Eberhart was one of the speak- 
ers. 

Little Falls — The found.ation hss bf n 
completed at the mw his'h school and 
the floor Joists have boon placed and 
rough flooring for the first floor. The 
six-ton steel beams w^hlch are to sup- 
port the floor of the assembly room 
are now being hoisted Into place. 

B 1 a c k d u c k — People from Farley. 
Hlnes and Tenstrike attended the meet- 
ing In the Presbyterian church at 
Blackduck Monday evening, which was 
conducted by Rev. Colegrove and Prof. 
Wegner of the evangelistic party. 



took the run between Grafton and Wal- 
lialla recently. Mrs. Brislan and eon, 
Frank, are in Montana. 

Grand Forks, N. D. — George Hayes, a 
pioneer resident of Kempton, Grand 
Forks county, Is dead. He is survived 
by his wife and eight children, Mrs. 
Aldridge. Mrs. Cummings of Arvilla, 
Mrs. Carter of Larimore, and Roy, Ida, 
Edward, Margaret and Grace, residing 
at home. There are also two sisters, 
Mrs. Kelly of Minneapolis and Mrs. 
Denean of Blbbn. Minn. 

Bismarck, N. D. — There will probably 
be a big decrease In the acreage of 
flax this year owing to the present 
low price of that commoditv. 

Fessenden. N. D. — While S. J. McCue 
of Bowden was returning from Fessen- 
den Monday evening with his automo- 
bile filled with girls who had attended 
a ball game in the latter town, the car 
upset. Frances Schmidt fell under the 
car, her right hip was crushed and 
she suffered other Injuries that may 
prove fatal. McCue'e Jaw was broken 
and some of his teeth were knocked 
out. 



WISCONSIN BRIEFS 



Janesvllle — Chief of Police George 
M. Appleby has resigned, stating that 
he has not sufficient support of city 
officials or equipment properly to po- 
lice the city. 

Marinette — Mrs. Joseph Skarda of 
Brazeau, Oconto county, a bride of ten 
days, drank carbolic acid in an at- 
tempt to kill herself. Phvsicians were 
called and her life saved. It is believed 
she is mentally dtranged. 

Madison— The medical bill, known as 
the O'Connor bill, 6o3A, upon which a 
public hearing was had earlv in April, 
was indefinitely postponed by the as- 
sembly without a dissenting vote. This 
is one of the Umbreit bills. The dupli- 
cate known as the Hoyt bill, 397S, is 
now before the senate. 

Merrill — Alex Sigurdson, aged 67, 
farmer ten miles north of Merrill, was 
struck by a train on the Milwaukee 
railway and died two hours later from 
injuries. He was a pioneer of Lincoln 
county. 

Marinette — Arthur Qllmore and John 
Johnson, serving ninety day sentences 
for misdemeanors, escaped from the 
county Jail. Gilmore has been recap- 
tured and officers are on the trail of 
Johnson. 

Chilton — A brewery, with all modern 
Improvements, is to be erected by the 
Calumet Brewing company on the site 
of its present building. Two buildings 
are to be put up this year. 

Madison — The congregation of 
Plymouth Congrtgatonal church has 
decided to erect a new church which 
will cost fl2,000. 

Darlington — L. R. Rowley, a farmer, 
captured four wolf cubs. The county 
pays $4 each, and the state a like 
amount, making his And net him $33. 

Milwaukee — Henry L. Ward was 
chosen director of the public museum 
for a term of flve years at a salary of 
$4,000 a year at a meeting of the beard 
of trustees on Tuesday. 




DAKOTA BRIEFS 



Fargo, N. D. — The annual maypole 
celebration at Fargo college will be 
held next Wednesday evenlnfif. The 
beautiful maypole dances wlU be con- 
ducted under a galaxy of Japanese lan- 
terns and electric lights. The Fargo 
college orchestra will furnish the mu- 
slui and thirty young ladies and gen- 
tlemen will unwind the ribbons of the 
maypole. 

Grand Forks, N. D. — Charles Lucks 
of Gllby had a hearing before the in- 
sanity board and was discharged. The 
trouble with the young man seems to 
be bodily ratehr than mental, his spine 
having been Injured by being thrown 
by a horse In Montana last year. He 
will be given medical treatment. 

Wheatland, N. D. — Francis Collins, 
the 4-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. F. 
Collins, received severe Injuries from 
the attack of an angry cow. 

Fargo, N. D. — Verna Frances, 11- 
month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. 
H. Phillips of 722 Thirteenth street 
north, died Tuesday morning. The lit. 
tie one was one of twins. 

Grafton, N. D. — Edward Brislan, an 
engineer on the Great Northern, who 
has been running on the Dakota divi- 
sion for many years died here from ce- 
rebral hemorhage. H« took sick Sun- 
day evening, and there was never any 
chance for his recovery. Mr. Brislan 
made his liome in Grand Forks till b« 



BLOOD DISEASES 

TEllS ITS OWR STORY 

Pimp!**, Spot* on the skin, »ore tlmat. swillen lon- 
tilU. b<>n«> i>alii/<, rAtarrh. dulled eje. luid I.acKurd look. 
Not only "lot* the TtcUm rf Wi.od <{t«eaeo suffer ptijrs- 
Ical ireakenUie wid meniM depncsloc hut has ilie tor- 
menting humlilkticn of kiiowli* ;h«t the raaUdy can- 
not bo cfmcealed from the erea ft frterul» Piood iii«- 
MLM« above al] diseases ahouU] have tTf almcnt the 
moment any cf lis gymr'tome are maiiifeFt. Writ* to 
Dr. Brown. fl» Arch street, Philadelphia. Si>eciallst 
OD Blood Diseases, cr Mnd for a boule o( 

BROWN'S BLOOD TREATMENT, $2 

— enoiich to laat a month. Take it aad octe the iiu- 
rroTeinerU Sold in Duiuih by Mu Wlrih. 15 West 
Bupcrlur atr««l, aad by all drusgtou. 



STEAMSHIPS. 



ALLAN "mT! line 



Ve«nle St. Lawr«ne« Rout* 

3 ] hwiMMrirMl aii } SstJSjrt l«M2?Snr. 
^ (OMkN. (tmrftjrt to ia«ra mA LMdeik 

Larse, Modem Triple and Twin Screw Steam* 
ers. First, Second and Third Qass. Popular 
'One Class Cabin" Service (Called second class) 
Rates 145 Aupwards to London. S47.SO to Glasgow. 

Lamsl— FloMl— FmImI tttaiMfa To ~ 



«LSflTlflN 'io^r CflLGflRlflH 



Will Btt Rvatfy •unim«r ••••on 

Luxurious Accommodations. Glass Enclosed 
Promenades; Electric Elevators, G>'mnasium, etc. 

■oaten to Qloocew, Sal Hoc vvvry two wr*«ii», 
carrying one class cabin (second) Passengers. 
All Steamers fitted with every Modem Equipment. 
,._^»^ Hooorvotjono Apply AlUii ACo. - 

tI7 N. Do^rbM-n St.. ChU^fo or Loo^l Ac<^ 




mmmm 



10 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 22, 1913. 



THE DULUTB HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 

PubilKbed e»iTy eveuluK except Sun- 
day by The Herald Company. 

Both Teh^phones — Bustnoss Oftlce, 824; 
Editorial Rooms, 1126. 



'^%/^/^^^/^/%/%i%/%i^i'%^/9t^/%.%'^W^/^^'%, ®/®/3/®/®/®/®/®/^'a^a'®' S^'S'S '^'%'^/%'W^/^'W^'^''^^''' 



THEY WHO SIT IN JUDGMENT. 



Knt*red H s««)nd-cla«i in«tt.r « tha I>''»fh post- 
ofac« under thu act of cougrwa of March 3. laiu- 

""omCIAL PAPER, CITY OF DILLTB 



aL'BSCRIFTION RATKS — By mall, pay- 
able in advance, one month, :<!» cents; 
three months, %\. six months, |^; 
on'» vear f4; Saturday Herald. $1 per 
year; Weekly Herald, $1 per year. 

Dally by carrier, city and suburbs, 10 
cents a week, 45 cents a month. 
Bubs^m.^ will confer • f»»or by making known 

any complaint of a«rTlo*. 

W^lfn ohanirtng tne addrea of yo'ir p»p«. U I* 

Impurt&iit to iiTH both old and n.9w a'ldreasa*^ 

The Duluth Herald accepts adver- 
tising contracts with the dlstiu- t guar- 
anty that It has the largest clrLulatlon 
In Minnesota outside the Twin Cities. 



POPULAR BOND BUYING. 

It will be surprising if the St. Paul 
experience in selling city bonds over 
a department store bargain counter 
doea not attract wide attention. 

Already, even before the St. Paul 
sale is closed, Minneapolis is talking 
of disposing of some of its bonds in 
that way, and an arrangement so well 
advertised as this has been is pretty 
certain to succeed 

Duluth hasn't any bonds on the 
market at this time, but it is likely to 
have sjine soon, and it will be is- 
sting bonds, more or less, in the 
future. When it does have an issue 
to dispose of it will do well to make 
arrangements to let its own citizens 
in on the sale 

Such a bond, bargain sale as that 
carried on in St. Paul and proposed 
in Minneapolis is highly democratic, 
and unquestionably it serves a good 
public purpose — several good public 
purposes, in fact It sells the bonds 
and gives the city the money, which 
ii the main thing. It keeps the in- 
terest money at home instead of 
sending it to New York or Boston. 
And it gives the citizens who buy 
these bonds a new interest in good 
government. 

The idea is a good one, but it 
should not be made a plaything and 
used to dispose of more bonds than 
could be absorbed by the regular 
market. Bond issues, as The Herald 
has said before, form an easy way to 
do city work on credit, but it is a 
thing that can easily be abused. 

No city should issue enough bonds 
to weaken its credit in the slightest 
degree; and it should not be over- 
looked that bond absorbed by small 
local buyers will have less effect on 
the city's credit than bonds put afloat 

on the general market. 

• " 

A New York preacher announces 
that he will marry no more couples un- 
less they produce health certificates. 
It would help a lot If people would 
Insist on similar certificates from 
Ideas before they become wedded to 
V:--m. 



THOSE SUFFRAGETTE BOMBS. 

We have lost count of the number 
of bombs, supposed to have been 
planted by suffragettes, that have 
been discovered in England, Ireland, 
Scotland and Wales. 

There have been too many of them 
to keep track of. 

But we haven't lost count of the 
number that have exploded. 

There have been none to count, as 
far as we have noticed, until one acci- 
dentally exploded yesterday in Scot- 
land. 

Some of them, judging from the de- 
scriptions, you'd have to take an axe 
or a piledriver to, if you wanted to 
set them off. 

Can it be that the British suffra- 
gette is displi-:ing a sense of humor 
which the British temperament and 
femininity are by some supposed to 
lack? 



Ex-Presldent Taft fired the starting 
grun at a foot race the other day. Now 
that he has taken such an active part 
In athletics no doubt he will accom- 
plish that reduction in weight he 
worked bo hard for. 



BRYAN AND BOSSISM. 

Speaking the other day, Mr. Bryan 
said: 'The day of the boss is gone. 
The people will write their own plat- 
forms hereafter." 

Which inclines the Republican 
W^ashington Star to rather heavy 
sarcasm: "But the very platforms 
which Mr. Bryan holds now were 
sacred," it says, "were not written by 
the people. Three of them were dic- 
tated by himself — that adopted at 
Kansas City in 1900, that at Denver 
in 1908, and that at Baltimore last 
year. He was so completely master 
cf the situation at Kansas City and 
at Denver that he remained at home 
and worked his will by long distance 
telephone. Last year he appeared in 
person at Baltimore, and was the 
ruling spirit in the platform commit- 
tee." 

All true. But what of it? 

There is no inconsistency what- 
ever between these facts and what 
Mr. Bryan said about bosses and 
platforms. 

The people wrote the Baltimore 
platform in the sense in which Mr. 
Bryan spoke of platform-writing, 
even if it was Mr. Bryan's own hand 
that penned the words. 

When Mr. Bryan speaks of bosses, 
and when the people speak of bosses, 
they do cot mean popular leaders, 



Let him whose garments bear no mark — no stain— 

The first stone cast at her who only wears 
The shreds of what was once a spotless gown — 

That to life's scourging now mute witness bears. 
And then let him who stands at peace with God 

Dare to bend earthward from his high estate 
And lay the hand of censure on the head 

Of her — who sinned — and not condemn her mate I 
— Beth Slater Whitson in June Ainslee's. 



^■:^'9/%'%/9^/9'9^9/9i%'^9^9^%^9^9^9f'9%9/^^%^^^'^/^^9''®^'^'^^^'^^^^^^ '^'^%^®/^W^%%^^y^/%M 



translating the people's needs and 
aspirations into platform planks. 
When Mr. Bryan speaks of the peo- 
ple writing platforms he does not in- 
tend to convey the idea of ninety 
million people clutching the actual 
pen that writes the words. 

Bosses are not men who interpret 
the people's will, but men who mis- 
interpret it and who work to balk it 
and defeat it. Platforms written by 
the people are platforms that record 
the people's needs and the people's 
will, no matter how few are the indi- 
viduals actually concerned in the 
rhetorical operation. 

From the Washington Star's view- 
point, doubtless Mr. Bryan was a boss 
when he led the people's fight at 
Baltimore and helped bring about 
the nomination of President Wilson. 
Doubtless, too, President Wilson him- 
self is a boss, from that viewpoint, 
when he insists on rigid adherence to 
the legislative program he considers 
to be the duty of his party now it is 
in power. 

But if these be bosses, then give 
us more bosses — of the same kind. 

But bosses of the kind Mr. Bryan 
is talking about, bosses who make 
politics a paying business by betray- 
ing the people into the hands of spe- 
cial privilege, are going out of busi- 
ness very rapidly; and the reason is 
that the people are not only writing 
their own platforms, but electing men 
who will carry them out. 



Now Rome reports an $8,000,000 
graft scandal In public building work. 
Evidently somebody amended the old 
saying to read: "When In Rome, do 
the Romans." 



THE PARCEL POST, BUSINESS GETTER. 

Merchants, the country over, are 
using the parcel post to expand their 
business. 

That is, big merchants are. 

What is the country merchant do- 
ing about it? 

He is closest to the rural buyers. 
He has the cheapest parcel post rates. 
He knows these buyers and their 
needs; they know him and his stock. 
What is he doing about it? 

After watching the country papers 
for several weeks with this idea in 
mind, we should judge that he is 
doing nothing about it. 

If the parcel post hurts him, as he 
feared it would when he was fighting 
its adoption, it will be his own fault. 

The merchants in the cities are 
making the parcel post useful to 
themselves by advertising. They are 
advertising in the widely circulated 
periodicals and the widely circulated 
dailies, reaching out in this way for 
the buyers of the country. 

So should the country merchant. 
His local paper circulates along the 
rural routes. So do the dailies and 
the periodicals. The dailies and 
periodicals are carrying advertise- 
ments aimed at the rural buyer, and 
they are getting business that way. 

When the local paper also carries 
the advertisements of local mer- 
cliants, aimed at the rural buyer and 
framed so as to tempt hira to buy, 
the local merchant will be getting his 
full share of the business created by 
the parcel post. So long as he fails 
to take advantage of this excellent 
way to reach his potential customers, 
he should not complain if much busi- 
ness comes off the rural routes and 
goes by his door to the city mer- 
chant. . 



have mingled with the certainty that 
the doctors' verdict gave, a paradox- 
ical hope that they might be mistaken. 

The whole country watched the 
sure progress of the grim reaper, ap- 
palled by this spectacle of a living 
death. 

Yet only the nature of the poison 
distinguished this case from many 
others. The average household is 
terribly careless in its disposal of 
poisons. A deadly drug rests side by 
side with a harmless household rem- 
edy, and the easiest thing in the 
world is to do just what this man 
has paid with his life for doing — to 
reach for the harmless remedy and 
swallow the poison. 



Once more it Is Japan's turn to move 
the pieces in the California game of 
chesty. 



ET CETERA. 

"As an interesting antithesis," says 
the St. Louis Republic, "we suggest 
the unscrambling of eggs and the 
re-organizing of the Rebuplicans." 

Not inept, that. 

But the comparison is more than 
that. Considering the difficulty of 
the two operations, it is also a paral- 
lel, or a synonym, or at least an ap- 
proximation. 



It's Hobson's cue to claim that the 
torpedo that came back and put a hole 
In the craft from which it was fired 
was fixed by a Jap so it would do 
Just that. 



THE OPEN COURT 



(Readers of The Herald are Inrtted to make free 
iiae of thU column to express their Ideas about the 
topics of iteTienil Interest, but dLitcusslons of sectarian 
reiljilotis dltTereiices are barrol. Letten must not 
exc*ed 300 words — the ahortac the beuer. They must 
be written on one side of the pa{>er only, and they 
must be acoompnnled in erery case by the name and 
address of the writer, thoueh Uiese need not be pub- 
lUhed. A signed letter is always more effectlra. how- 
ever.) 



NEW CITY HALL IS 

DECLARED A NECESSITY. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

Duluth certainly needs a new city 
hall. The present structure is miser- 
ebly laid out, entirely too small and 
as unsanitary as a British prison ship 
in Revolutionary war times. 

That big vacant block east of the 
postofflce now spends most of its time 
covering the sidewalk with slop in 
summer and treacherous, slippery ice 
In winter. It would more perfectly 
fulfill Its municipal mission if made 
the proud site of a modern city hall, 
costing anywhere from $250,000 to 
$500,000. 

In keeping with the "grouping plan'' 
adopted w^hen the courthouse was 
erected and necessitated by increase in 
mail business, a fine postofflce build- 
ing soon will be Imperative on the site 
west of the present structure. A new 
city hall should appear on the scene 
as soon as that. If not before. 

A trinity of public buildings like 
that would be worth going many miles 
to see, as well as a great comfort to 
the precloue public. 

If entitled to the floor, Mr. Editor, 
and not out of order, I move to amend 
that decision of a?i anonymous mil- 
lionaire to construct one boulevard for 
I this municipality, so that it shall read 
I and mean^ "One $500,000 model, mod- 
ern city hall." 

The yeas seem to have it. The yeas 
do have It. Incidentally, this change 
in a philanthropist's plans, so easily 
and quickly made, will cause Andrew 
Carnegie's public library to look like 
the original 15 cents. 

JOHN L. MORRISON. 
Duluth, May 22. 



a 



GO TO IT, HICKEN!" 



Never mind. Twenty-five or thirty 
years from now you probably will 
have forgotten all about the kind of 
weather we have been having this 
spring. 



^ A TRAGEDY. 

The day's news seldom carries a 
story of greater poignancy and 
pathos than that of B. S. Walker of 
Macon, Ga., who died last night after 
lingering a week, in the face of cer- 
tain death from a deadly poison taken 
by mistake. 

The peculiarly distressing feature 
of the case was that though doctors 
told the man that there was no known 
antidote for the poison he had taken, 
and that death was certain, the effects 
of the drug were so insidious that he 
did not feel them. So he was able 
to set his affairs in order, to gather 
his friends about him, and to pro- 
ceed outwardly almost as though 
nothing had happened, though within 
was the crushing intelligence of a 
death sentence, irrevocably imposed. 

It was Inevitable, when the symp- 
tomatic effects of the poison were so 
slight, that the victim should have 
found it hard to believe that death 
was at hand, and that there should 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

Good for Hlcken! Go to It! You are 
the first man in Duluth who has en- 
forced the law. Oftentimes I've won- 
dered when I myself went downstairs 
right off of Superior street on the 
lower side and pressed the button four 
times. A small hole in the door 
opened from the inside and you were 
admitted (on Sunday) to take what 
drinks you wanted and saw the bar 
always lined, and I must say by the 
more respectable boozers. Yes, you 
wondered how It could go and the 
vigilant police marching up and down 
that .street. As far as I knew there 
was only a saloon there, but read In 
the papers that a gambling joint had 
been raided there some time ago. I 
read in today's papers of a Socialist 
giving several reasons why Mr. Hlcken 
should be recalled. His reasons arc so 
Insignificant along-fide of what Mr. 
Hlcken is doing and Is going to do, 
that It simply loses Itself Into nothing- 
ness. While I am not a frequent voter, 
being always on the road, I will pledge 
myself that if steps sljould be taken 
to recall Mr. Hlcken I shall be there 
to vote for him, if it takes the last 
coupon In the mileage book. 

A Socialist who first of all lectures 
on law enforcement and special privi- 
leges to none. 

FRANK ANDERSON. 
Bemldji, Minn., May 20. 



The Senate and ihe Tariff 



By 8«.f»yard. 



A Sauill Fable. 



Pittsburg Post: A man was cast 
ashore on an unknown Island and 
found a high state of civilization. Ar- 
tists painted beautiful pictures and 
singers sang marvellous songs. To 
them he paid tribute. But there was 
a little withered man to whom poets, 
painters, everybody bowed down. 

"What has this man done?" asked 
the traveller. 

"He has accumulated 8,000,000 co- 
coanut shells," they told him in awed 
whispers. 

At first the traveller was Inclined to 
laugh, but then he thought of condi- 
tions In his own country and became 
thoughtfuL ^ , . ^ , L.. , 



Washington, *l*y -2 — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The bouse of represent- 
atives, fresh from, the people has 
l.a.ssed tlio refofjn -larlfl by an over- 
wliehnlng maJoflty**f ler an exhaustive 
debate upon eaoh of-the f jurteen sched- 
ules, the Income tax and administrative 
features. Only flv« Democrats lined 
themselves against the measure, four 
from Louisiana and on* from New 
York. Their losg was made good by 
the action of four Progreuslves and one 
Independent Republican, who voted for 
the bill. It Is aignlticant that two reg- 
ular Republicans from Wisconsin voted 
for the bill. No amendn ent offered by 
any opponent of the bill was adopted. 
It is the only tariff In fifty years that 
the representatives of ths people made; 
for the "Interests." acting through 
Gorman of Maryland, Smith of New 
Jersey, and Brlce of Ohio, writ large 
their graft in the Wilson tariff of I8a4. 

But at that period there obtruded the 
coinage question. The panic of 1893 
had taken the minds of the people off 
the tariff, and by the time the tariff 
was off the hooks the people had 
ceased to think about it and all we 
heard of was 16 to 1. That is what 
caused the treason to be fortunate — 
that was the opportunity of Gorman, 
Smith and Brice. 

• * • 

But the people are net going to be 
diverted from the work of overseeing 
public affairs this tlmo. They began 
the bossing of the job last year when 
they forced the Baltimore convention— 
at the time almighty reluctant — to 
nominate Woodrow Wilson for presi- 
dent. They saw to it that he was 
elected. They have watched every 
move of this extra sesion of congress. 
They are for the bill as it passed the 
house of representatives, and If the 
senate shall cut capeis and shines 
there is going to be a row such as we 
have not had for many £. long day. 

And the senate would queer the bill 
In a moment If it dared, and It Is given 
out that the senate Is going to debate 
the question for months, though the 
people decided the thin,? last Novem- 
ber and the house of 1 epresentatives 
has merely echoed the voice of the peo- 
ple. But the senate is lent on debate, 
possibly on the Idea of :he Italian ac- 
tor, who, cast for the part of Othello, 
Insisted on blacking his ;?erson all over 
Instead of confining that process to his 
face and hands. The Republican side 
of the United States itenate has so 
long been the faithful henchman of 
monopoly that It canno: refrain from 
going through its stunt of fetching and 
carrying for its master. 

• • • 

And hence the annoimcement that 
two Republican senators — names not 
given — will occupy one week each in 
academic discussion of the tariff In 
behalf of protection and in neither 
speech will be found a thought that 
will "fill the hunger ol Ignorance or 
quench the thirst of curiosity." Only 
one American of our 10),000.000 popu- 
lation will read both these speeches — 
the proof reader at tl a government 
printing office, a poor devil whose 
trade it is to read such slush and 
whose food and raiment depend on it. 
Besides the proofreader, the author of 
each speech will read his own stuff, 
and nobody else in the world will pay 
the slightest notice to either. But the 
people will foot the printing bills. 

The ablest speech in favor of pro- 
tection I ever heard was Tom Reed's 
close of the Republican side of the de- 
bate on the Wilson bill in 1894. It was 
the longest speech Reed ever delivered, 
and he held the floor just one hour and 
a half. John G. Carlisle never occupied 
as much as two hours in the delivery 
of any speech he ever riade. Perhaps 
the most consummate specimen of par- 
liamentary eloquence the English 
tongue can boast was the reply of 
Charles James Fox to William Pitt on 
the question of the Pes.ce of Amiens, 
and Fox was on the flosr on that oc- 
casion less than an hour. All the au- 
thorities are agreed that the most 
brilliant and the most elDquent. though 
not the ablest, speech the British par- 
liament ever heard wfis Richard B. 
Sheridan on the resolution to Impeach 
Warren Hastings, and in occupied less 
than one sitting of the commons. Of 
Lord Bacon It was said that while he 
was speaking the only concern of his 
hearer was that he "might make an 
end," and Bacon, tremendous Intellect 
and eloquent orator that he was, never 
made long speeches. Neither di(? 
Chatham, neither did Heiry Fox, neith- 
er did Patrick Henry, neither did John 
C. Calhoun, neither did Daniel Web- 
ster. 

Some of Burke's speeches are long; 
but it is doubtful if he aver consumed 
more than three hours in the delivery 
of the longest he ever made. 

• • • 

Now let me tell you — t ven though he 
be a senator In congress, the man who 
consumes a week, or hUf a week, in 
the delivery of a speech, is generally 
an ass. James Guthrie of Kentucky 
was one of the most successful practi- 
tioners at the bar our country has 
produced, and he never spoke more 
than half an hour to bench or jury in 
his life. James G. Blal le was one of 
the most brilliant parliamentary de- 
baters of his day, and he never held 
the floor as long as two hours on any 
single occasion In either house during 
the entire twenty years of his con- 
gress'onal career. William Plnkney's 
speech on the admission of Missouri 
will rank with any eloqi;ence the Unit- 
ed States senate ever heard, and It was 
conclusive of the subject. It was a 
short speech. 

One of the greatest m-m our country 
ever produced was the late John T. 
Morgan of Alabama. He had one fault. 
He made long speeches, 3urled his wis- 
dom and his patriotism in a mass of 
words. His was a luminous mind, and 
his fame will wane because he was so 
voluminous of speech. It he had been 
as brief as Matt Carpenter or Allen G. 
Thurman, or George G. Vest, or Ben 
Hill, or L. Q. C. lAmar, [ do believe he 
would have been a bigger man than 
any one of them. There are enough 
jewels in those speeches of his to make 
the fortunes of a dozen great states- 
men. If they could be segrregated. gath- 
ered together and distributed. 

• • * 

And I now assert that Morgan was 
the only voluminous orator I ever 
heard who was also luminous. All the 
re.«it were, and are, stupid. We are 
going to be afflicted wit i a heap of rot 
by the senate this Bumm'?r, for the sen- 
ate is fixing to put Itself across the 
path of reform and forbid Its further 
advance. 



The CottHtry frev>p«ipaper. 

Mulvane, Kan.. News: Advance to 
the Inner door and give three raps. 
The devil will attend the alarm. You 
will give your name ard address and 
the number of years you owe for the 
paper. You vrlU then be admitted to 
the sanctum, an<l will advance to the 
center of the room, where you will 
address the editor With the following 
countersign: Mold the right hand 
about two feet from the body, with 
the thumb and finger clasping a $5 
bill, which you will dro? Into the edi- 
tor's hand, saying: "Were you wait- 
ing for me?" The editor will grasp 
your hand and the Wll. and will say, 
"You bet." That ends the ceremony. 
Anything after that Ifi merely Inci- 
dental and unimj;>ortant. 



Statesmen, Real and Near 



By Fred C. Kdlf. 



Washington. May 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Cliamp Clark, when a 
small boy, worked for a farmer down 
In Kentucky who had a disposition 
like the average rattlesnake. The man 
used to beat Champ on slight provo- 
cation, and. as the latter did not then 
stand six feet two, nor weigh 240 
pounds, there was nothing for liim to 
do but take the beatings — and bide his 
time. 

As he saw himself developing Into 
sturdy young manhood. Champ Clark 
watched hla muscles waxing strong 
with much gleeful satisfaction. There 
was a certain important use to which 
he desired to put his muscles just as 
soon as the proper time arrived. He 
purposed to hunt up that farmer who 
had abused him and deal him out a 
little retributive Justice. His idea wag 
to give him a thrashing that would 
not only even up all scores to date, 
but that would linger long in the 
man's memory as one of the note- 
worthy events of ills life. 

* • • 

However, (Thamp did not wish to be 
In too great a rush about it. He felt 
that he was becoming a fairly husky 
young person, and he knew also that 
as time was making him stronger It 
probably was mai:ing the older man 
weaker; still, it was too important a 
thing to take chances on. He earnest- 
ly desired that he should be in just the 
carmine of condition when the little 
reunion took place. If waiting a year 
or two longer would contribute to the 
success and gaiety of his little plan, 
he was willing to endure the delay. 

It was ten years before Champ Clark 
determined that conditions were right 
for going back to that farm and cre- 
ating a red-letter day for his former 
employer. And those ten years hadn't 
softened his feelings toward the man 
who had trounced him when he was a 
small youngster. Champ had a good 
memory, even in those days, and be 
felt tow^ard the man much as he did 
toward one William Jennings Bryan 
for several months following the Bal- 
timore convention. 

• • • 

Well, anyway, Champ Clark knocked 
off from his school-teaching job one 
Friday evening and set out on a day's 
journey to find the man he had been 
waiting those ten years to meet again. 
As he neared the old farmhouse, the 
recollections of the beatings he had 
endured there came back as if they 
had occurred within a week Instead of 
a decade, and he patted his biceps to 
make certain he was fit. 

It had been a long wait, but at last 
his time had come. He knocked at the 
door, and even then clenched his fists, 
ready to begin the exercises. 

But there was a hltcli In the pro- 
gram. Ten years had dealt harshly 
with Champ Clark's former employer. 
His wife and children had died, and he 
lay 111. He was all alone when Champ 
entered the house, and there were 
signs of poverty and distress about the 
place. 

"I came here to beat you up," re- 
mp,rked the future speaker of the 
house; "been waiting to do that for 
ten years, but — I guess I won't" 

Instead he took his meager savings 
from his pocket, left it with the man, 
and went liis way. 

«< * • 

Now, while we're on the subject, 
here's an entirely different sample of 
Champ Clark's memory. When he was 
a young law^yer out In Louisiana, Mo., 
Old Man Burwell, as he was known, 
ran a grocery that served as a forum 
where young and old might meet and 
talk politics. Old Man Burwell didn't 
like to stop talking politics to sell 
sugar or other commodities, and his 
grocery did not prosper as it might 
have, but he had a lot of Influence po- 
litically. He could tell three months 
in advance who would be elected 
sheriff and the vote he would receive. 

W^hen Champ Clark got it into his 
head to run for prosecuting attorney, 
Old Man Burwell helped him. Young 
Clark might have been elected any- 
how, and then again he might not. At 
any rate, he appreciated Old Man Bur- 
well's help, and never forgot It. 

Not so long ago he received a letter 
from one of his old neighbors, contain- 
ing gossip of old-time acquaintances, 
and one bit of news It contained was 
that Old Man Burwell had met finan- 
cial rever.se3 and was having all kinds 
of hard luck. 

With the note from back home still 
In his hand, the speaker seized a check 
book and signed his name to a slip for 
enough to take care of Old Man Bur- 
well for a while, and dictated a letter 
to his secretary. 

"And," he admonished his secretary, 
"don't tell my wife about this. She 
might think It was extravagance." 
« • • 

Hon. Carl Hayden, congressjnan-at- 
large from Arizona, looked up from 
his desk the other morning to see the 
outstretched hand of a beaming and 
well-favored stranger who said he just 
dropped In to pay his respects. He re- 
marked that he had once heard Hay- 
den make a speech In Phoenix, Ariz., 
and had been profoundly impressed. 
He was a great friend, he said, of 
Henry Rowe, down In Arizona. Did 
Hayden know Henry? Why, said Hay- 
den, he and Rowe used to wear each 
other's clothes. 

"I thought you must be pretty inti- 
mate," said the stranger; "he just 
wrote me that if I wanted anything In 
Washington to drop in and see you. 
I'm waiting for a draft that will be 
here tomorrow. Meanw^hlle I am mo- 
mentarily short of funds." 

Hayden let him have $2 until the 
next morning. 

An hour later the elevator man 
asked Hayden If a tall stranger had 
been In to see him. 

"You know he is the fellow," ex- 
plained the elevator man, "who makes 
a specialty of hunting up the name of 
somebody In every member's town, and 
using It as a means of making a touch. 
He did pretty well, I'm told." 

(Copyrljflit, 1818. by Fred C. Kelly. All rights reserved.) 
. ♦_ 

Tke Limit. 

Life: The question of states rights 
having come up, every state had some- 
thing to say. 

"There can be no doubt," said one 
State haughtily, "but that I have a per- 
fect right to order my own Internal af- 
fairs In any way I see fit." 

"But," said another State, "you seem 
to forget, my dear sister, that In this 
particular instance, by asserting these 
rights so strenuously, you are involv- 
ing all the rest of us." 

Thereupon a vote was taken and It 
was unanimously decided by the ma- 
jority that their rights should always 
be respected; each state voting, how- 
ever, that this rule applied to all the 
other states, but not to itself, which 
led a dislnteresited, but Intelligent, ob- 
server to remark that this was about 
as far as they would ever go. 



Cured Him. 

Life: Helter — How did you cure your 
boy's infatuation for that trained 
nurse? 

Skelter: Let him see her without 
her uniform on. 



Pavra-e«t 

Woman's Home Companion: A little 
boy having his music lesson was asked 
by his teacher, "What are pauses?" 

And the quick response was "Thlngrs 
that tfrow on pussy-cats." 



Minnesota Opinions 



CommenU of the Siat« Presa. 



Ob to Hinckley! 

Pine River Sentinel: Those who do 
not attend the meeting of the N. M. D. 
A. at Hinckley June 5 and 6 are going 
to miss something worth while. A 
program Is being arranged and the en- 
tertainment features will not be of the 
kind that will be "disremembered" 
soon. Cass county should select dele- 
gates that will be sure to attend, and 
many boosters should gu alons with 
tliem. 



SncakinK Back. 

Walker Pilot: Ever notice how some 
of those folks who are howling "back 
to the farm" always do it with their 
face toward the city? 



Wliy NotT 

Brown's Valley Tribune: If Minne- 
sota could start anew, we believe it 
could greatly improve over present 
conditions as to laws and manner of 
government. Why not a constitutional 
convention to pave the way for a gen- 
eral reorganization? 



AlmoMtl 

Le Sueur News: And here comes 
another! The Democrats no'v require 
— for the first time in history — banks 
to pay Interest on all the United States 
money they hold on deposit! Also ac- 
cept city, county and state bonds for 
security! Also deposit more money! 
Sayl It almost makes one feel as 
though the country were being run for 
the people of It. 



The Railroads' Place. 

Anoka Union: The legislature passes 
laws and the people proceed to obey 
them, but the railroads refuse to and 
publicly proclaim It. It Is about time 
in this man's land that the railroads 
were brought to terms, or know the 
reason why. They are but servants, 
or should be, of the people, and should 
be made to so understand. 



Each for Himself. 

Mad' son Western Guard: The Anoka 
Union is wondering who will take care 
of and work for the non-partisan can- 
didate. Most of us have to take care 
of and work for ourselves — why not 
the candidate? 



Mo^'lng Alonie. 

Northfleld News: Although we have 
not yet had sufficient experience with 
the commission plan of city govern- 
ment to be able to say unqualifiedly 
that It has demonstrated Its superior- 
ity over the more representative form, 
there are those already who are advo- 
cating the extension of the principle to 
the state. 



Worth CouMlderlng. 

Hlbbing Mesaba Ore: It has been 
proposed that the government of the 
state be placed In the hands of a com- 
mission, and several of the newspapers 
of the state have commented favorably 
on the proposal. 

The plan, as we understand It, Is to 
entirely do away with the system of 
government under which the state is 
now^ working, and have a board of 
commissioners administrate the state's 
affairs, the work of the commission, 
although along a greater scale, to be 
much the same as that of similar 
bodies In cities having that form of 
government 

The plan Is worth consideration, and 
if it proves successful in Kansas, 
where it is shortly to be given Its first 
trial. It seems that Minnesota surely 
should be able to make a go of it. At 
least, we will keep one eye on Kansas 
and watch with much Interest the 
working of this modern method of 
government In Its first application to 
the next to the largest of bodies 
politic. 



The Error ofSelfishness 

Troy Standard Press: Imagine a rose 
that would say to itself: "I cannot af- 
ford to give away all my beauty and 
sweetness; I must keep it for myself. 
I will roll up my petals and withhold 
my fragrance." 

But, behold, the moment the rose 
tries to store up Its colors and treas- 
ures of fragrance, to wltlihold them 
from others, they vanish. The colors 
and fragrance do not exist In the un- 
opened bud. It Is only when the rose 
begins to open Itself, to give out Its 
sweetness, its life, to others that its 
beauty and fragrance are developed. 

So human selfishness defeats its own 
ends. He who refuses to give himself 
for others, who closes the petals of his 
charity and withholds the fragrance 
of his sympathy and love, finds that 
he loses the very thing he tries to 
keep. The springs of his manhood dry 
up. His finer nature becomes atro- 
phied. He grows deaf to the cries of 
help from his fellow men. Tears that 
never are shed for others' woes sour 
to stinging acids In his own heart. 

Refuse to open your purse, and soon 
you cannot open your sympathy. Re- 
fuse to give, and soon you will cease 
to enjoy that which you have. Refuse 
to love, and you lose the power to love 
and be loved. Withhold your affections, 
and you become a moral paralytic. But 
the moment you open wider the door 
of your life and, like the rose, send out 
without stint your fragrance and 
beauty, you let the sunshine of life 
into your ow^n soul. 



Classified. 

Life: Howard — Why do you term 
your wife an angel? 

Coward — Because she's always ready 
to fly, she's continually harping, and 
she hasn't an earthly thing to wear. 



An Old Man's Wlitm. 

"Erie, Iry. Ickery, Ana, 
nilsy. Fallsy. Nlcliolas. John. 
Queeror, QuaTer, KnglUh Knarer, 
Splnkum, Spaiikum, — out!" 

That's the game that we used to play 

Yender there In the orchard lot — 
Seems like it wasn't but yesterdayl 

An' many 's the time that I have sot 
Here by the chlmbley, romancin', 

A-watchln' the shadders that f-1t 
about — 
Shadders of us at our play again 

Out yender, "counting each other 
out." 

Seems like It wasn't but yesterday, 

Or mebbe the day before — or two — 
Things look different through eyes of 
gray 
Than what they did through our 
eyes o' blue — 
Seems like the world was prettier 
then. 
An' more Invltln'-Uke, I declare. 
Harder to leave and blesseder when 
We "counted 'em out" In the or- 
chard therl 

Men are but children, a wise man says, 

An* nothin* truer, I 'low, can be; 
Things and dreams of our yesterdays 

Are facts of tomorrow, it seems t' 
roe; 
So as 1 muse in my rockln' cheer 

A-watchin' the shadders that flit 
about. 
Unseen hands are a-hoverln' near 

An' unheard voices are countln' out: 

"Erie. Iry. Irlwry. Ann, 
riUay, r&Uiy. Nicholas, John. 
Quewer, Quaver, ijuriiitli ivnurm*. 
• • • • 

I wander who'll be nertr* 

— John D. Wells in Buffalo Newn. 



Twenty Years Ago 



Prom The Herald of thla dat«. ISML 



•••The Duluth Jobbers' union, after 
months of persistent work, has suc- 
ceeded in securing an additional train 
to the West over the Northern Paclflo 
road. It will be put on May 28. 



«•«' 



The Bay View Land company 1« 
considering seriously the erection of a 
pavilion upon Its property on the 
heights. The company has entered 
into a contract with the Marine band 
Of Duluth and the West Duluth band 
to give in combination Sunday after- 
noon concerts at Indian park. 

•••The National Investment H5m- 
pany, organized to build a hotel at 
W*>st Duluth, held a meeting in the 
office of Charles F. Lamb this morning 
and elected the following officers: 
President, B. C. Dent; secretary, L. A- 
Barnes; treasurer, C. W. Hoyt; attor- 
ney, Charles F. Lamb. The directors 
are: H. P. Smith. B. C. Dent, Charles 
F. Lamb. L. A. Barnes and C. W. Hoyt. 



•••The Irish home rule meeting at 
the Temple was well attended. Mayor 
d Autremont Introduced the speakers, 
who were Bishop McGolrlck. John W. 
Willis of St. Paul, E. C. Gridley and 
C. P. Maglnnis. 



•••John P. Sheridan will appear at 
the Temple tonight in "A Niglit In the 
Bristol." in which he will take the 
character of the Widow O'Brien. 



•••W. B. Welles, H. M. Myers and 
E. Q. Swanstrom have been selected by 
the Duluth Stock exchange to repre- 
sent It at the reciprocity convention to 
be held at St. Paul. 



•••Miss Katherlne Fleming died 
after a brief Illness from cerebro 
spinal meningitis at the residence of 
her parents. Rev. and Mrs. W. A. Flem- 
ing, Lester Park, this morning. Sha 
was private secretary to E. R. Gllman. 
general manager of the Great Western 
Manufacturing company, with offices 
at Chicago, and ten days ago was 
called to her home by the death of lier 
only brother, Robert S. Fleming, who 
succumbed to the same disease. 



•••Miss Georgia Thompson, teacher 
of the East Duluth school. Is ill and a 
substitute Is In charge of the school. 



•••C. E. Bassett and mother will oc- 
cupy one of the Ashtabula flats after 
June 1. George A. French will make 
his residence with them. 



•••Articles of Incorporation of the 
Duluth Coffee & Spice company have 
been filed with the register of deeds. 
The capital stock is $60,000, and the 
Incorporators are George A. Wieland, 
A. J. Miller and John O. Howard. 



Unburled Body at Gettysburg. 

Gettysburg dispatch to the Philadel- 
phia Record: Mute testimony to one 
of the many tragedies of the battle of 
Gettysburg was found today in the 
wild mountain region eight miles west 
of town, when the body of a Confeder- 
ate soldier, with much of the equip- 
ment, was discovered under almost a 
toot of leaf mold, the accumulation of 
half a cetnury. 

The find waa made by Clarence A. 
Wills while surveying a tract of land 
seldom traversed, save by hunters. He 
was first attracted to it when he step- 
ped on the end of the barrel of the old 
musket. Digging away the leaves ho 
found the hammer and lock and the 
trade-marks showing the English- 
made gun, which was much used in the 
Confederate army. 

A belt buckle, part of a canteen, sev- 
eral dozen Confederate mlnle balls and 
other equipment were found upon 
further search and, finally, a shoe was 
discovered. All were close together be- 
tween two huge rocks, and would pos- 
sibly never have been discovered had 
not the surveyor's line chanced to run 
over the spot. All the wooden and 
cloth portions had long since decayed, 
and the body of the man to whom they 
belonged had long since decomposed 
where It It fell. A flattened bullet 
bore testimony to the manner In which 
he met his death. 

The two large rocks at which tlje 
find was made are on an eminence 
which commands a view for twenty 
miles or more, and overlooks the routs 
of Lee's retreat after the battle. A 
large rear guard followed the Confed- 
erate army, which is known to have 
been scattered over the territory 
where today's find was made. 

Kllpatrick's Union cavalry pursued 
over the same ground, and the theory 
held by local historians Is that the Con- 
federate skirmisher was standing on 
one of the rocks when struck by a 
Union bullet. 



Sorry .She Spoke. 

Ladles' Home Journal: The lady 
had Just been Introduced to her part- 
ner at a holiday dance and was talk- 
ing to him vivaciously. "Tell me." 
she said, "who Is that terribly homely 
man over there?" 

■yhe gentleman looked. "That." he 
said, ponderously, "Is my brother." 

"Oh!" gasped the lady In horrified 
amasement, "Pardon me. really I 
hadn't noticed the resemblance." 



AMUSEMENTS. 



LYCEUM I TODAY 



Contlnuoi 



-1 to 6, 7 to 11 p. m. 



KINEMACOLOR 



And T>e Lnxe Plctnreii. 
"Feather Top" 
''Aftcrnooa Dresses* 



TODAY 

■10c; Xl>chtw^lOo-aOc. 



Matlm 



HOHDtY, MAY 26, l)A^»^ 

— IS — 
«<The Witneas for the Defense** 
Prices — sec to 92.A0. Seats now 

■ellinir. 



Tuesday and Wednesday 
- May 27th-28tii ~ 

Matinee Wednesday. 
CH A.UIWC E vr ■ 1 

LCOX 1 

in "The Isle 0' Dreams" 

Direction Henry Miller. 
SBATS TODAY. 

Nights g»c to IXOO, 
Matinee — BOc to tLSA. 



•WHERE YOUR MMICV DOES ITS DUTY. 

EMPRESS -TODAY 

NEW SHOW — ^RAYMO!VD PAINS 

AND A BUNCH OF PRJSTTY 

GIRLS IN 



MATINEB 

SiM 



lOc- 



*'THE GIRL 
QUESTION" 

Fnn and Mnale. 
lftffht»-^««0 and »i15. 

i4Sc — aoc — asc 



I 




I 



1 




— ^ 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 22, 1913. 



U 



You'll Do Better at Kelly's 



House- O • f 

furnishing !^pCCtalS 

For This Week Only ^^^ 




HAMMOCKS. 

You will find a choice se- 
lection of Porch Swings, 
Couch Hammocks, and com- 
tortabIt> Hamzuocks of all 
kinds here. We have a groort 
hammock with valance and 
pillow, complete 
with Met of hooks, 
at, each 



73c 



PORCH SHADES. 
We have a complete line of imported and 
bamboo Porch Shades, complete with fixtures. 
This week we are making a special price on a 
Bamboo Shade, natural color, size 4x8; com- 
plete with fixtures at. 

Each— 89c 



II 



The 



COMBINATION 
CLEANER. 





VACUUM SWEEPERS. 
Have you seen the S. S. Combination 
Cleaner; does the work of a vacuum 
cleaner and a carpet sweeper. You do 
not have to use the brush all the time — 
only when needed. A slight pressure of 
the handle brings it to the floor. Come 
in and let us show you how it works. 
Guaranteed — Kelly's price 



$11.00 




MIRRORS. 

French bev«l 

plate bathroom 
Mirrors. with 
white enamel 
frame, oval shape, 
size of glass 12x16 
Inches — Kelly's 
special at. each — 

$1.95 



GAS Ol^XS. 

Tliese ovens can 
be uaed on gus, 
grasollne, or oil 
stoves; fit over 
aingrle opening — 
Kelly's special at. 
each — 

98c 



\»'ATER 
GLASSES. 

Heavy Water 
Glasses. In Co- 
lonial pattern. 
fiTood, clear 
glass; set of 
six — Kelly's 
special at, set 



U'ASH 
BOARDS. 

Strong wood 
frame with 
heavy g: 1 a s s 
rubbing s u r- 
face; a first 
class board In 
every respect. 
Kelly's special, 
each — 

39c 



CHINA CUSPIDORS. 

A large assort- 
ment of styles, 
gold and florai 
decorations; worth 
up to 75c — Kelly's 
price, each — 




49c 




SALAD BOWLS 

. China Salad Bowls, Japan- 
ese pattern. Toklo red bor- 
der and design; worth 75c 
each — Kelly's price, each — 



29c 




HAMPERS. 

Good Im- 
ported 
willow 
Hampers, 
square, 
round, or 
oval; a reg- 
ular 13.00 
value — 
Kelly's 
special at, 
each — 




garbage: PAILS. 

Heavy galvan- 
ized Iron Pails, 
have tight-fit- 
ting cover and 
b a 1 1. Small 
size, each — 




69c 



Large size, 
each — 



$1.98 89c 






^h-^i 



REFRIGERATORS AND GAS RANGES 
AT SPECIAL PRICES 




Health and Beauty Ans\vers 



BY MRS. MAE M.ARTYN. 



E^jther: I was glad to read that you 
are recommending my almozoln wrin- 
kle-removing jelly recipe to your 
friend.s. The shampoo recipe you ask for 
consists only of 1 teaspoonful of can- 
throx dissolved In a cup of hot water. 
It lathers freely and will thoroughly 
cleanse the scalp and makes the head 
feel good. By shampooing the hair with 
canthrox every 2 or 2 weeks it will re- 
main soft and fluffy. Canthrox also re- 
lieves itching and irritation of the 
scalp. (If troubled with dandruff read 
answer to Elsie). 



Worried: Waste no tlm? on liquid 
preparations. Use a delatone paste, 
made by mixing together powdered 
delatone and water. Apply to hairs not 
wanted and in 2 or 3 minutes rub off, 
wash the skin and the hairs are en- 
tirely dissolved. This is a quick, harm- 
leaa method, but be sure you get the 
delatone In an original package. 



Mr.s. G. : Try pyroxln on your eye- 
brows and you will be delighted on 
how thickly they will grow. By the 
same treatment you can make short, 
straggly eyelashes come In long and 
curly Apply the pyroxln at lash-rootg 
with thumb and forefinger. You can 
buy pyroxln In a small, original pack- 
age, but be careful and don't get any 
where no hair Is wanted. 



Birdie: I agree with you. A bright, 
clear, youthful eye is always attrac- 
tive and admired. Most girls neglect 
to give the eyes proper care. Very few 
use an eye-tonic, which I think es- 
sential In caring for the eyes. I have 
found the following tonic to be fine for 
•Weak, tired and inflamed eyes. Go to 
your druggist and get one ounce of 
crystos and dissolve It In a pint of wa- 
ter. Use two or three drops In each 
eye night and morning. It will not 
emart. This Inexpensive eye-tonic will 
do you lots of good and relieve you of 
that dull, tired feeling above the eye.' . 

Beulah: You are not the only girl 
with a sallow complexion and oily skin 
who cannot find a face powder that 
pleases her. But you need not despair. 
There are other aids to beauty more 
satisfactory than face powder and the 
use of wa.<*hes is becoming more popu 
lar everywhere. Here Is a recipe for a 
wash that when on seems part of the 
Bkln that you can make at home and It 
will cost much less than any manufac 
tured brand. Dissolve 4 ounces of spur. 
max in a half-pint of witch hazel or hot 
water and add 2 teaspoonfuls of gly- 
cerine. This will make a complexfon- 
beautlfler that whitens and softens the 
akin without the use of powder, and It 



also tends to remove pimples, tan and 
freckles. 

Flo: Yes dear, smiling makes crow's 
feet as easily as worry, but don't stop 
smiling on that account. Scowling age 
and eye-troubles also make deep wrin- 
kles. You can quickly remove wrinkles 
and keep the face velvety and smooth 
at very little cost by making at home 
and using regularly this greaseles.s 
vegetable Jelly-cream, which does not 
grow hair. Get from your druggist one 
ounce almozoln and dls-solve It in half- 
pint of cold water or witch hazel, add- 
ing 2 teaspoonfuls of glycerine. Stir 
and let stand one day. Apply to wrin- 
kled surface and leave through night 
then wash off and use more of the 
cream as a massage. This treatment 
will remove and prevent the most ob- 
stinate wrinkles or finest crow's feet, 
text r ^^® **^*" '° ^ velvety 

Rlsie: Neither you nor your husband 
win be embarrassed by dandruff set- 
tling on your shoulders If you follow 
these simple directions: Brush the hair 
and apply a quinine halr-tonlc. made bv 
d ssolvlng 1 ounce of qulnzoln In U 
pint of alcohol and adding M pint of 
cold water. Apply once a week. This 
tonic removes dandruff, stops falling 
hair and keeps the scalp in a healthy 
condition promoting the growth of hair 
and making it glossy and abundant. 

KatheHne: Do not be alarmed be- 
cause you have become fleshy. Most 
of us gain weight in winter. To make 
a never-failing flesh-reducer, get from 
your druggist 4 ounces parnotls and 
dissolve It in 114 pints hot water. Take 
1 tablespoo^iful 3 times a day just be- 
fore meals. 

f«^iilf^' I?'ir <5rowsy, tired, worn-out 
nnniof^v. ^'°^ "'""^ °' "" ^^ve at the 
fi?f ^ ?^ of warm weather, comes from 
whioh^ 1°"*''' Impurities in the blood 
which generally lead to slcknesn or 
poor health. At the first sVs of spring 
a good blood-purlfylng tonic should bf 
Th«".Jl?' every member of the family. 
The expense of making such a tonic 
Hill be email If one gets from the drug 
store % pint alcohol and 1 ounce kar- 
dene, then mix the.se with % cupful 
sugar, adding hot water to make a 
quart. A tablespoonful taken before 
meals will soon clear the blood of all 
Impurities, banish pimples and sallow- 
nesH and restore lost appetite and en- 
ergy. No known remedy is so strensth- 
enlng and energizing to a tired "worn 
out 'system as this old-fashioned bodyl 
regulator. It Is one of the best health- 
restorers known to medical science. 

Oorlnne: A brisk walk In the fresh 
air will do a common headache lots of 
good. J 



TlwDocTOR's Helps 



By DONALD McCASKEY.M. D. 




M«inb«v of Smb. G«a«nl Hoapital/ 

LaocMtar. Pa.i Fallow of th* N«« 

Verk AndMity of ■•(Ucla« 




HOW TO RELIEVE NUMB 

AND PAINFUL HANDS 



Mrs. Rosa, C. E., •writes: 

"My trouble Is in my hands. They get numb and go to sleep. I can scarce- 
ly sew or hold a pen because of the lack of strength. I lave much pain In 
them, and the only way I get relief is to permit them to hang down at my sides 
until they feel better. Many times at night I must elthei get up and walk 
around or else let them hang out and down from the bedside until they come to 
life again. My health is otherwise fairly good, although I liave had this trou- 
ble with my hands for years. I am 47 years old and had no trouble during my 
change of life, which occurred five years ago." 

The quickest measure of relief that you can obtain for yourself for the 
condition described In your letter is to stimulate the circulation of the blood 
within the millions of blood vessels In your hands. 

Do this: When the feeling of numbness and pain begins to develop, Imme- 
diately plunge both hands and forearms up to the elbows in a bucket of hot 
water. The water should be as hot as you can possibly endure it. Hold the 
extremities in the hot water until the skin becomes a livid red color and the 
veins stand out greatly distended. It may require Ave minutes to accompllsn 
this. It may take fifteen, but the point is HAVE THE WiATER HOT ENOUGH. 
TO BRING ABOUT THIS VERY GREAT REDNESS. Of course, be prudent 
about the temperature of the water, so that you do not scald yourself. Here Is 
where your own common sense will have to be displayed. 

Dry the hands when the blood has been pulled into "hem as described 
above, and go about your work again. 

Many times It will not be convenient for you to procure a bucket of hot 
water when your hands need treatment. When this is the case, hold your fore- 
arm out in front of you with the elbows pinned in to your sides. Then with an 
up and down motion vigorously shake your hands at the wrist. Shake as though 
you Intended to throw your hand away from the wrist. This Is a practical help 
which the great pianists frequently adopt when their liandij are cold, stiff or 
not responsive. 

At night time on retiring you should apply to your hands and arms a solu- 
tion of glycerine, one ounce dissolved in a six-ounce bottle of water. Mittens 
or woolen gloves should be worn to encourage the clrculitlon during your 
hours of sleep. As the human hand is made up of nearly two dozen tiny 
muscles, you can help strengthen these by a little simple perseverance. 

First, spread your Angers out as far as possible. Then bring them to- 
gether. Do this fifty times whenever you think of it. Then Hpfead your thumb 
the same way and bring it back again. Each little thing you do which strength- 
ens and increases the supply of blood to your hands will be helpful, unless 
there Is some nervous disease back of your annoyance. 

If the above line of simple home treatment does not promptly bring relief, 
you need a detailed and searching examination of your entire system made by 
a competent medical attendant Give the above treatment ycur best efforts for 
at leas't one month. If results don't come by then, there exists some deep- 
seated cause for your ailment that must be examined into b'- your medical at- 
tendant. 



music will be furnished for the occa- 
sion by the Bryant school orchestra. 

The supper will be served by mem- 
• Iters of the domestic science class. A 
menu of several courses Is being 
I'lanned under the direction of Miss 
Adelaide McCullum, domestio science 
instructor. 

Albert Edstrom, president of the 
clmaa, will be toastmaster. 




West End Briefs. 



Kenneth A. Barnes of Chicago la 
visiting at the home of his parents. Mr. 
and Mrs. M. A. Barnes of Thirty-fourth 
avenue west. 

Rev. riwaney Nelson, pastor of the 
Swedish Baptist church returned this 
noon from "Two Harbors where he con- 
ducted services yesterday. 

The Young People's Society of the 
Swedish Methodist church will be en- 
tertained tomorrow evening at the 
home of Miss Ruth Nelson, 2115 West 
Fourth street. 

Miss Mary Nelson, 2733 West First 
street will be hostess tomorrow eve- 
ning for the Young Ladies' Guild of St 
John's English Lutheran church. 

The Adams Alumni association' will 
meet In the Adams school tomorrow 
evening to plan its annual banquet for 
the graduating class. 

Wlllard Martin of Blue Earth, Minn. 
Is a guest of West end relatives this 
week. 

Bowels Irregular, blood bad, killing 
headaches, poor color, Ustlessnoss — 
yoifre a dead one_^ Come to life, take 
Holllster's R. M. 'Tea or Tablets. Lion 
Drug store. 



I ^kc!Y(^(l.%Yaiv^^ 



THE STORE FOR SERVICE. 
113.115>117-119 WBSST SUPBRIOR STREET. DULUTH. MINlf. 



Special n^xU*., 

Side of Datnr< 



%l% 



m Fixtures ! 



GAYNOR VETOES THE 
WELFARE ORDINANCE 



WEST END 

HERALD BRANCHi 
Hemuin OUun, Manager, 1S2S WstH Superior Street. 



Says New York Police Force 

Is Freest of Graft in 

Thirty Years. 

New York, May 22.— The legislative 
measure authorizing establishment of 
a public welfare board in this city, to 
take from police jurisdiction the en- 
forcement of lawa against gambling 
and the social evil, has been disap- 
proved by Mayor Oaynor. 

In his veto message, the mayor cites 
as his objections that the excise evil, 
which he declares Is the principal 
source of police graft. Is still left for 
the police to handle; that by constitut- 
ing a board of seven commissioners, 
responsibility would be divided Instuad 
of centered upon one department head, 
and that there is no need for a special 
board to handle the two evils, as 
"never In thirty years has there been 
so little corruption In the police force 
as now." 




In order to acquaint many new customers with our new de- 
partment for bathroom fixtures, you will find these very spe- 
cial items on sale in the Basement Store tomorrow and 
Saturday . 

These fixtures are made- in neat 
designs on brass base and hea\aly 
nickel plated. The assortment 
consists of the following articles: 

Tumbler Holders 

Tooth Brush and Tumbler Holders 

Soap Dish and Tumbler Holders 

Toilet Paper Holders 

Bath Tub Soap Holders 

Bath Tub Seats 




DANIELS GRITICiZES 
DEPARTMENT WAYS 



PETITION FOR 

USE OF SANDSTONE 



Objections to Crushed Rock 
Pavement Take Con- 
crete Form. 

Maintaining that the wishes of the 
majority of the property owners on 
Twenty-third avenue west should be 
heeded regarding the kind of pavement 
to be laid on the avenue, a petition con- 
taining signatures of a large percent- 
age of the owners of property Is being 
prepared asking that sandstone be 
used for the entire pavement. 

Those back of the petition say that 

laying part brick, part sandstone and 

part crushed rock will give the street 
the appearance of patch work, and, that 
in addition to the looks of the street, 
the question of its durability is the one 
to be most considered. It is claimed by 
them that sandstone Is the only ma- 
terial which will be of any material 
value and that the crushed rock which 
is to be laid above Fifth street will 
last but a short time. The owners 
point to examples of crushed rock on 
streets In other parts of the city to 
bear out their contention that It will 
not last long on the hillside. 

Among the property owners who are 
said to have signed the petition which 
is being circulated are Ed Benson, W. 
Mathews, J. Rivers, A. Konecnczny, 
Alex Nelson. H. R. Elliott, Louis John- 
son, Anton Johnson, John Olson, John 
Jaeger, Dr. A. Osterberg, Dr. O. A. Ored- 
son, Axel Bloom, A. Stake, E. A. Smith, 
Dr. L. Q. Greeley, Andrew Jentoft, Hel- 
mer Jentoft, Anton Nelson, Rev. Ed- 
ward Erlckson, A. Strand. Henry Truel- 
son, John Olson, Hans Olson, Fitger 
brewery, Mrs. H. Christianson, Big 
Stone Lumber company, John Wahl 
Candy company. Zenith Telephone com- 
pany, Emil Johnson, W. Alcenbrach, 
David Adams. Ed Akerstrom, Charles 
Benson. A. Lofgren and E. H. Olson. 

A counter petition Is ^also said to be 
In circulation on the hillside asking 
the commissoners not to pay any at- 
tenton to the one requesting the sand- 
stone. It is claimed by those object- 
ing to the sandstone that this material 
Is wanted only by those living below 
Fifth street, where the crushed rock 
pavement will start. They also say 
that the majority of the owners above 
that point are not financially able to 
pay the higher cost made necessary by 
using that material. 

WILL re openI viarket. 

West End Site Will Be Available for 
a Few Weeks. 

Arrangements will be made for the 
formal opening of the West end pub- 
lic market place at the meeting of the 
West end Commercial club tomorrow 
evening. The club has assurances 
that the city will be allowed to use the 
ground until late In the summer, the 
owner of the lot having Informed mem. 
hers of the club's garden committee 
that he would not commence building 
operations on the lot for a few weeks 
yet. 

It Is probable that plans tvIU be 
made to open the market place a week 
from next Saturday. A number of the 
farmers have signified their Intention 
of bringing some of the early vege- 
tables to the city on that date. 

The place has been used occasionally 
during the winter and spring months 
by the farmers when they came to 
town. These have used It for disposing 
of poultry and poultry produce, hay, 
wood and other products. 



STRAWBERRY 

PLANTS ARRIVE 



Will Be Sold to School Chil- 
dren at One Cent 
Apiece. 



The children of th 
Intend raising straw 
can now get the plar 
son, 2102 West Superl 
of the Commercial 
which arranged to ge 
ed that he had rece 
plants and that they 
uted to the first coi 
each. 

"This is Meal weat 
plants," said Mr. Sim 
Ing. "We have Just r 
do not expect them t' 
than until tomorrow r 
want them can call 
I will give the proper 
planting them." 

It is expected that 
rush among the chil 
plied with the plants 
the children of the 
schools who have en 
contest have signlfle. 
of planting the berry 



3 West End who 
berries this year 
ts. L. A. Slmon- 
ar street, member 
club's committee 
t the plants stat- 
;ved 1.000 of the 
would be distrib- 
liers at one cent 

her to put in the 
onson this morn- 
ecelved them and 
) last any longer 
ight. Those who 
at my home and 
Instructions for 

there will be a 
dren to be sup- 
). About 100 of 

four West end 
:ered the garden 
1 their intention 

plants. 



Wins Silver Medal. 

Miss Pluyllis Nesblt was awarded 
tht silver medal at the oratorical con- 
test held by the Duluth Scandinavian 
W. C. T. U. at the First Swedish Metho- 
dist church. Twentieth avenue west 
and Third street last night. Miss Nes- 
blt rendered the selection "Geraldlne." 

In spite of the wet weather the 
ohurch was crowded to listen to the 
program and contest. The young wom- 
en taking part were besides Miss Nes- 
blt, Misses Dalla Nelson, Judith Pal- 
leen, Ruth Boren and Gabrielson. The 
program also Included a vocal selec- 
tion by MrSL C. W. R Wermine and 
songs by the audience. 

The Judges wore Rev. C. W. R. Wer- 
mine, Mrs. E. Larson and A. Thoren. 



MOTHERS' CLUB. 

Mayor Prince Will Speak at Meeting 
at Bryant School. 

A program of severe! numbers Is be- 
ing arranged for the meeting of the 
Mothers' club at the Itryant school to- 
morrow evening. The program Is be- 
ing arranged under the direction of 

Miss Katherine King, principal of the 
school. 

Mayor Prince will be the chief speak- 
er. An address will also be given by 
Miss King Mrs. W. H. Wellington, 
president of the cKb will preside. 
Among the selections to be given will 
be a piano duet by Misses Luella Neff 
and Daisy Durant. violin solo by Her- 
bert Miska, reading by Miss Cora 
Davis and selections by Willis Price, 
May Hart and other children of the 
school. 

A feature of the entertainment will 
be a Maypole dance In which the girls 
of tlie upper grades w 11 take part. 

Following the program, lunch will 
be served by the girls of the dome.stic 
science class. Miss Adelaide McCulUim 
will be in charge of the serving of the 
lunch. The visitors will also be given 
an opportunity of viewing the equip- 
ment and work of the manual training 
department. 

The Bryant school Is probably one of 
the best equipped grsde buildings in 
the city. Two large rooms in the base- 
ment have been set aside for manual 
training purposes and domestic science. 
Another room is arranged for a gym- 
na.sium, while the room set aside for 
the Mothers' club which is also located 
in the basement, has been fitted up with 
furniture which Is the result of the 
liandlcraft of the members of the man- 
ual training class. 



Blames Government for 

Situation on Armor 

Plate Bids. 

Washington, May 22. — Responsibility 
for price agreements among manufac- 
turers furnishing aa-mor plate for 
American warships la placed directly 
upon the navy department itself by 
Secretary Daniels. In a statenxent fol- 
lowing his announcement of his Inten- 
tion to submit a plan for a govern- 
ment armor plate plant, the secretary 
declared that the policy of the depart- 
ment In dividing plate contracts among 
all bidders at the lowest figure offered, 
"makes all pretense of competitive bid- 
ding to get the lowest market price a 
farce that cannot possibly appeal to 
anyone acquainted with facts. 

Mr. Daniels said he was glad the 
resolution for an Investigation of this 
matter^ Introduced recently by Senator 
Ashurst, was before congress, and that 
it only anticipated a formal statement 
which he proposed to prepare request- 
ing relief from an Intolerable situation. 
How It Has Been Done. 
How contracts for armor for the new 
battleship Pennsylvania were let by 
Secretary Meyer last March was told 
in the statement. Three steel com- 
panies submitted virtually Identical 
bids and the contracts were divided 
among them. 

"If we are going to subsidize the 
Carnegie. Midvale, and Bethlehem com- 
panies," said Secretary Daniels, "so as 
to have the advantage of their armor 
plate in time of war, then let us do 
so honestly and man-fashion by stat- 
ute, without concealment or attempt 
at evasion of the intent of congress to 
force competition and award contracts 
to the lowest bidder. If we are, on 
the other hand, going to honestly 
award our contracts to the lowest bid- 
der, let us do so. The effect would pos- 
sibly encourage real competition 
among the companies, provided always 
that the present contention of the de- 
partment of justice that the steel com- 
panies are a combination Is disproved 
by the evidence." 

IMAY IDENTIFY 




49c 



Regular prices up to 75c, spe- 
cial Friday and Saturday, choice 
of any article, 49c. 




Mirrors $ 1 .48 

White enamel frame mirrors 
with bevel edge glass. 12x16- 
Inch 8lze; regular price $2.00, 
special price Friday and Sat- 
urday, $1.48. 




Coat Hangers 

Wire Coat Hanpers — Regular 
price 5c each, special for Fri- 
day and Saturday — 

3 for 5c 



1879 




1913 

(lader Government SupervisUa 



ANNUAL SUPPER 

AT GRAC E CHURCH. 

Ladles of the Qrac,-, M. E. church. 
Twenty-second avenue west and Third 
street, entertained at their annual sup- 
per and sale of fanc}- articles In the 
church last evening. The affair was 
attended by about 350 people. 

Mrs. S. T. Plummer wUha number of 
matrons presided over the kitchen. 
Mrs. George R. King had charge of a 
candy table and Mrs. Frank Dardls and 
Mrs. W. J. Weaver w^re In charge of 
the fancy work table. Ahiong the 
women who assisted Ir thp kitchen and 
had charge of tables were Mrs. J W 
Allen. Mrs. Beatty, Mrs. Peterson, Mrs. 
M. A. Barnes, Mrs. H. N. May Mrs 
Campbell, David Adams, Mrs. W H 
Leonard, Mrs. R. H. Wellington, Miss 
Gertrude Wellington and Miss Hazel 
Molr Mrs. 1. W. Prestjn had charge of 
the door. i ' 

• u. - w 

Bryant Banquet. 

The Bryant alumni association will 
give its annual banquet to the graduat- 
ing class in the schojl Jklay 28. Ar- 
rangements are being made to enter- 
tain 150 persona at tlie 8U]^p«r. The 



R OCHES TER MAN. 

Baltimore, Md.. May 22. — The publi- 
cation here of a picture of a mvater- 
ious "J. C. R." In the Rochester. Minn., 
state hospital, who thinks he is a na- 
tive of Baltimore, may lead to his 
identity. 

William J. Schaefer, an undertaker 
here, said he was struck by the re- 
semblance of the picture to James 
Ridgeway, whom he last saw six or 
seven years ago. Schaefer said Ridge- 
way, who had been a painter, told him 
of his Intention of leaving Baltimore 
and said he might enter the army or 
navy or go West. Schaefer does not 
know whether Ridgeway served In the 
navy. 

According to a Rochester dispatch, 
"J. C. R." said his father was an of- 
ficer in the navy. 

O'CONNELL TELLS 

OF CALL ON POPE. 

Rome, May 22. — Cardinal William H. 
O'Connell, archbishop of Boston, after 
a long audience with the pope yester- 
day, summed up the Impression he had 
gained in a comprehensive sentence. 

"The pope," he said, "seemed like a 
man who, after a sleep, had awakened 
fresher, stronger, revitalized." 

Cardinal O'Connell was accompanied 
to the Vatican by Mgr. Michael J 
Splalne and Dr. Slattery, both of Bos- 
ton, who remained in an ante-chamber. 
Mgr. Sanz De Samper, papal chamber- 
lain, conducted the cardinal to the li- 
brary, where Pope Pius was seated at 
the writing table. 

The cardinal, taking off hlg skull 
cap, was about to kneel when the pope, 
stretching out his arm, prevented himi 
saying: 

"O'Connel! Come — come!" 

Cardinal O'Connell found the pope 
rejuvenated, looking in better health, 
brighter and more energetic than when 
he last saw him at the end of 1911. 

LAUGHSATTRAIN 

RO BBERY CHARGE. 

Kansas City, Mo., May 22. — Louis C 
Watson, the man suspected of having 
held up a Kansas City Southern train 
on May 1, has been formally accused 
of train robbery. Jesse M. Short, the 
JopUn mine owner, who was shot by 
the bandit, was present and renewed 
his assertion that Watson was the 
man. Watson refused to discuss the 
charge. He laughed, however, and In- 
timated that the whole thing was a 
Joke. 



THE VALUE OF A 
CHECKING ACCOUNT 

is clearly apparent to the man or woman who uses one. 
If you are not now enjoying its advantages you will find, 
upon investigation here, that in operation it is simplicity 
itself, while the results are certain to be of benefit. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK 

Savings Department open every Saturday nlaht from 6 to 8 o'clock 



not guilty yesterday to two indict- 
ments charging him with having con- 
tributed to the delinquency of minors. 
The pleas were entered after Oscar 
Lawler, attorney for Blxby, had failed 
to have the indictments quashed. 



nixby Plea«« Not Gnlltr. 

Los Angeles. Cal., Mny 22. — George H. 
Blxby, the Longr Beach banker, pleaded 



ENTERTAINMENT AND 



Court Dn Luth No. 724, Independent 

Order of Forester*, ForeMtPr*' hall, 

corner F^turth Ave. yvemt & First St. 

FRIDAY EVENING. MAY 23rd 

Free to Foreatem and friend*. 



Justice court, where she was tried on 
a charge of threatening children of 
Mrs. J. Goode Cabanne. She sued Mrs. 
Cabanne and three other neighbor* 
for 160,000, the sum later being re- 
duced to $30,000. The other defend- 
ants were Monroe Price, Eugene Drey- 
er and Jules Blngle. all prominent In 
society circles. 



SOCIETY WOMAN 

G IVEN DAMAGES. 

St. Louis, Mo., May 22. — A year ago 
subjected to a Justice court trial, Mrs. 
Clara Manger, a society leader, was 
yesterday awarded $20,000 damages In 
the circuit court against four neigh- 
bors. She testified her health had 
been Injured by her appearance In the 



SECRETARY OF 

NAVY IN FLYER. 

Annapolis, Md., May 22. — Secretary 
of the Navy Josephus Daniels made an 
aeroplane flight here yesterday after- 
noon with Lieut. J. P. Towers, U. S. N.. 
as aviator. The secretary remained 
aloft about five minutes, circling over 
the waters of the harbor at an averag^e 
height of about 500 feet 

"It was delightful; I enjoyed the 
sensation thoroughly." the secretary 
said lust after he alighted. 

-• . — 

^''ot^m Down rommiMilon Plan. 

Iowa City. Iowa, May ;2.— Iowa City 
yesterday defeated by a vote of 1 194 
to 999 a plan to adopt the comiuig- 
slon form of government. 




f6r Infants and Children. 

*rhe Kind You Hare Always Boii«rlit has borne the gigna*^ 
turo of Chas. H. Fletcher, and has been made under his 
personal supervision for over 30 years. Allow no one 
to deceive you in this. Counterfeits, Imitations and 
«* Just-as-good" are but Experiments, and endanger tha 
health of Children— Experience against Experiment. 

The Eind Yon Have Always Bought 

' Bears the Signature of 
















- ^ 


















• 




* 












' - ^^M 


■ 

^ 




























"*■ 








r •• - ■' 






























* 






























1 




















k 


f — ' 


i 

t 

1 




' 








1 









■■■p 



T2 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 22, 1913. 





The Latest 

News Published 

on This Page 




1-^ 



EDITED 
BY BRUCE 




The Herald 

Sporting Gossip 

Is ReHable 








iTO TOE HOPE 

iBIDOE 




MEMBER OF THE 
SOX HEAVING STAEE 



bt<n called back to IWayo county, Ire- 
land, bv the 8<rlous illiieps of his par- 
tnts. Mr. FiUmaurico wa« formerly 
one of the K"-atcst steeple chase rid- 
vm of the auld land and while there 
he will takt In sevtral of the blfr 
meetlnifH on the otlier Bide of the 
I brine. 



BY BRUCE. 

^^AIX is H2 in an exag- 
gerated sense. It is often 
used for promoting the 
growth of wheat fields, cre- 
ating optimism among the 
"bulls" and consequent pessimism 
among the "bears" of the wheat pit. 
or vice versa. Rain is also at times 
utilized by milkmen and distillers. 
Rain comes in series of three, but 
guessing the combination has proved 
quite as difficult as puzzling out some 
of the combinations of the Monte 
Carlo ivory ball proposition. 

Rain is a persistent enemy of those 
fond of attending butchers' and gro- 
cers* picnics and baseball games. Bar- 
tenders are fond of rain as it often 
drives people indoors and boosts in- 
door amusements to a more or less 
extent. 

Noah was more or less experienced 
in matter of rain. Under the rmg 
name of Jupiter Pluvius rain has be- 
come famous throughout the breadth 
and length of this country, and is 
even favoraMv known in Europe. 

Rain has a habit of showing up very 
well upon special occasions, such as 
the glorious Fourth, Decoration day. 
nearly always upon Labor day. and 
generally upon most baseball days 
during the month of May and upon 
all days set aside by the worthy 
butchers and grocers for extreme 
mirth and jollity. 

When caught in cisterns and bar- 
rels, rain may be used for washing 
hair and countenances tending to the 
verge cf wrinkling. It also thusly 
proved an excellent medium for small 
boys to frolic mirthlessly with small 
kittens and tightly wound bags, said 
kittens being immured in said sacks. 

Rain has also been utilized with 
excellent effect in musical comedies 
and several series dramas. Street 
inspectors don't seem to mind the 
rain in the least, for you always see 
the sprinkling carts out immediately 
before the rain starts and immediate- 
ly after it has ceased to rain. Mavbe 
thev don't take it seriously. For 
washing streets then rain is not con- 
sidered very strongly, perhaps be- 
cause the water is too soft for this 
purpctse. 

Baseball players are as a rule not 
adverse to rain occasionally, as their 
salaries continue unabated, so to 
speak. The poor owner of the team 
is the one to suffer, often raving and 
tearing his hair, if he possesses any. 

The double header is an institution 
growing directly out of the rain. The 
rain check is another of the by-pro- 
ducts. The mobbing of umpires is a 
practice that has been aggravated 
jcmewhat by rain and the practice of 
lalling games to prevent rheumatism 
ind wet feet. 

The mud lark, not a bird, but a race 
horse, was an institution (betting 
15 a thing of the pasti that sprang to 
immense popularity through the gen- 
erous and lavish use of rain. 

Some horses can't run in the rain. 
Others can't run at all. though their 
owners refuse persistently to be dis- 



abused of this idea, but that is beside 
the present theme. Some horses can, 
to resume the argument. After run- 
ning these horses several times on 
dry days and having them gloriously 
beaten, scheming owners brought out 
the old nag on rainy days, and with 
the odds 40 to i against the mud lark 
for place or show, said old mud lark 
would canter in and owner would 
collect. 

Rain has its uses and likewise its 
abuses. In the present frame of 
mind we refuse to cogitate further 
upon its uses, as we held converse 
with Harry A. Blume several times 
yesterday and we have not as yet 

recovered from the shock. 
• • • 

pfJITH anything human in the shape 
IliJ of weather the final game with 
the St. Paul team is due to be fin- 
ished this afternoon. Just to think 
of it. Bill, here these St. Paul boys 
have been in our midst for two days 
and we have not seen hide nor hair 
of 'em. Gosh darn the luck! 

What we all want to do is to get 
out and boost the old game along 
during the remainder of this pestifer- 
ous month. The members of the Du- 
hith Baseball association should get 
some of the money back they have 
dropped during the rain. It costs 
the owners of the club fifty bones 
every day there is no game, this be- 
ing the rain guarantee, and this is in 
addition to the daily expense of keep-: 
ing the team. 

It is generally believed that from 
the financial point of reckoning the 
backers of baseball are in for the 
best year for a number of time 
spaces. That is. naturally, if Brother 
Richardson will call off the war ele- 
ments and give us some merry sun- 
shine, around which songs and cake 
recipes have been written. 

The present men behind the game 
here are deserving of the support of 
every booster of this old city. They 
have gone ahead and sunk money 
into the ball park and have ungrudg- 
ingly paid, out kopecks for players. 
They are. not complaining, only 
swearing somewhat testily at the 
weather. Good crowds during the 
remainder of the series will only al- 
low the directors to break even and 
see the warm rays of appreciation. 

St. Paul and Minneapolis were 
counted upon as the best drawing 
cards here of all the teams. Let us 
hope thai the Saturday and Sunday 
attendance records will break all pre- 
vious turnstile counts for these two 
days. 

Outside of several of the pitchers 
the Duluth team is playing real base- 
ball. Fans, since the birth of this 
old game, have loved hitting. It is 
the milk and honey of the national 
pastime. Hitting is just what the 
Dooks are doing. 

Weather has been against any 
semblance of shape for the twirlers, 
and until the weather warms up con- 
siderably it is not fair upon the part 
of any of the fans to judge harshly 




NATIONAL LEAGUE 



, Won. 

' Philadelphia 21 

Brooklyn 19 

1 New York 15 

Chicago 17 

St. Louis 16 

Pittsburg' 14 

Boston 11 

Cincinnati 9 



Lost. Pet. 
7 .750 



11 
14 
16 
15 
18 
17 
22 



.633 
.617 
.615 
.616 
.438 
.452 
.290 



TEUTON IS GOING 
LIKE A HOUSE AEIRE 



BRACKETT. 



of the flinging ability of any mem- 
ber of the White Sox staff. 

It was Ella Wheeler Wilcox or 
someone else who remarked about 
the fitness of charity starting at 
home. 



NORTHERN LEAGUE 



Won. 

Minneapolis 16 

Superior 13 

"Winona 15 

Duluth 12 

Winnipeg 13 

Grand Forks 13 

St. Paul 10 

Virginia 6 



Lost. Pet. 



8 

8 
10 

9 
13 
16 
14 
17 



.667 
.619 
.600 
.571 
.600 
.448 
.417 
.227 



Tn 



I WOULDN 
MISS IT 
iPOR THE 

WORLD. 

/good Old 

5TAG 
o 





Yesterday's Resulti». 

Winnipeg, 5; Virginia, 1. 
Winona. 3; Grand Forks, 2. 

Gameii Today. 

St. Paul at Duluth. 
Minneapolis at Superior. 
Winona at Grand Forks. 
Virginia at Winnipeg. 

virginiaIets 
trimmed again 



Winnipeg, Man., May 22. — Winnipeg 
took the second game of the series 
here yesterday wht-n the Virginia crew 
was beaten by the count of 5 to 1. 
Schlmmens pitched a better game than 
the ccore would indicate, but received 
indifferent support from his team 
mates. Winnipeg played errorless ball 
behind Buddy Moe and pulled some 
brilliant fielding plays. 

Manager Flood doubled in the fourth 
round with two on and cinched the 
contest for the locals. Shannon was 
chased from the game and also plast- 
ered with a fine. Score: R. H. E. 

Virginia 10 0—1 6 4 

Winnipeg 3 1 1 x— 5 6 

Batteries — Schlmmens and Hard- 
grove; Moe and Banchant. 

winonaTakes 
14-inning game 



Here's 

the Stag Story: 

The sweetest, cool- 
est, TASTIEST 
smoke of them all. 
You buy HALF as much at a time. 
You buy TWICE as often. 
So your tobacco is always FRESH. 
It is the great, unbeatable combina- 
tion. EVER.LASTINCLY GOOD 

STAG 



Grand Forks. N. D., May 22.— Though 
Winona defeated the Flickers by the 
score of 3 to 2 here yesterday it re- 
^ quired the visitors fourteen frames to 
turn the trick. The game not only 
broke the long distance record of the 
new league but was one of the prettl- . 
est pitching duels that has been fought | 
out in the new organization. Neither j 
of the opposing twirlers showed the 
slightest signs of weakening during 
the long baseball Journey, though Bell 
must be given credit for pitching the 
stronger game. , . , ^ 

Winona counted In the third when 
with Connell on third Chase let the 
ball go through him and the run was 
over the pan. . In the fifth Croake 
stopped one with his anatomy and then 
Bell doubled and the second run came 
in. Carney scored Geriach with a sin- 
gle in the eighth and with two gone 
in the ninth the Flickers tied the score 
when Geriach doubled with Chase on 
the towpaths. The final score came in 
the fourteenth when Croake, who had 
walked and been sacrificed to second, 
scored when Carney muffed a long fly 
from Connell's bat. Score: R. H. E. 

Gr Fks. 00 0000110000 0—2 8 9 
Winona 0010100000000 1—3 13 2 
Batteries — Myers a.nd Geriach; Bell 
and Meyers. 

DULUTH MAN WILL 

VISIT AULD IRELAND. 

Michael Fitzmaurice, who has been 
In the employ of John Mlllen as a 
chauffeur for the past five years, has 



Yesterday'ii Iflesultii. 

Pittsburg 5; Brooklyn. 2. 
Philadelphia, 12; Cir.cinnati, 0. 
Chicago, 6; Boston, 5. 
St. LoulB, 4; New York, 3. 
♦ 

Win Second Game. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., -May 22.— Pittsburg 
made it two straight la the series with 
Brooklyn yesterday 3y breaking up 
the inner defense of ihe locals In the 
eighth. The score wis tied, 2 to 2, 
when Vlox opened that Inning with a 
Texas leaguer. Four sacrifice bunts 
in a row followed, Ragan and Smith 
making wild throws on the first two. 
Bvrne and Miller worked a squeeze 
play on the fourth but, Miller scoring 
the third run of the inning and mak- 
ing the tally 5 to 2. which was the 
final count. Brooklyn's two runs were 
scored In the fourth when Stengel 
walked stole second and came home 
with Klrkpatrlck on ihe latter's drive 
for the circuit. Adams, although fre- 

: (luently In hot water held the locals 

' runless in the other eight Innings. 
Moran opened the game for Brooklyn 

, with what should have been a liomo 
run but was held at third and failed 

I to score. Daubert and Otto Miller wero 
put out of the gam^i for protesting 
Klem's decisions on strikes. Score: 

R H. B. 

Pittsburg 010(0108 0—5 7 7 

Brooklyn 1: "0 0— 2 7 4 

Batteries — Adams and Simon; Ragan 
and Erwln and O. Miller. Umpires— 
Klem and Orth. 

♦— 

Giants Lose ftnother. 

New York, May 22.— St. Louis won its 
second successive game from New 
York vesterday. 4 to 3. Tesreau held 
St. Louis to four hits, but was wild. Is- 
suing six passes. He passed the first 
three men who faced him in the first 
inning, but got out df that hole with 
onlv one run scored off him. Sallee, 
though hit harder than Tesreau was 
effective In the pinches. His poor In- 
ning was the fourth, when New York 
scored two runs on tv'o singles, a steal 
and three errors. St. Louis won in the 
eighth when Konetchy's single drove 
home Evans and Sheckard. In^th^ 
local's half of this lining, they filled 
the bases and McGraw took out Her- 
zog, who had made two hits and sent 
In Meyers. The latter sent an easy 
fly to Sheckard. Manager Huggins 
was put out of the game tor protesting 
a decision. „ „ „ „ . . . 

St. Louis 10 0010 20—4 4 4 

New York 10 2 0—3 9 1 

Batteries — Salee and Wingo; Tesreau 
and Wilson. Ump res — Rlgler and 

Byron. 

♦ 

Reds Defeated Badly. 

Philadelphia, May i 2.— Cincinnati re- 
ceived the worst def'^at of the season 
here when Philadelphia won yester- 
day's game by 12 to 0. The home team 
drove Johnson and Harter off the rub- 
ber in three innings each and making 
three hits off Smith's delivery ran 
their number of safeties to twenty for 
thirtv-one bases. Ciavath made four 
singles and a triple In five rimes at 
bat, the latter sending In three runners 
in the first Inning. Luderus made a 
home run, a double, a single and a 
sacrifice flv In five trips to the plate. 
In addition to holding Cincinnati down 
to three singles, Sea ton made a home 
run and a single. Score: „ „ ^ „ „ „ . 

Cincinnati ^ ^ ^ ^^^'1'^^—^ 

Philadelphia 4 2 2 2 2 x--12 

Batteries- Johnson. Harter, SmUn 
and Clarke: Seaton and Hawley, KilU- 
fer. Umpires — O'Day and Emslie. 
« 

Boston Loses Anotlier. 

Boston, May 22.— Chicago won again 
from Boston yesterday, 6 to 5. tie\x\- 
bach had the locals safe up to the 
eighth inning, when he was <lnvfn 
from the slab. Chicago. In the third 
inning massed a double, two singles and 
a home run. The latter by Zimmer- 
man for four tallies and bunched hits 
off Hess In two other sessions for 

cSgr".'- 004 00 1010-6 10 2 

Boston 000 00005 0—5 5 1 

Batteries — Reulbach, Cheney and 
Archer; Hess and ".Vhaling, Rariden. 
Umpires — Brennan and Eason. 




MINNEAPOLIS COMING 

FOR THREE-GAME STAND 



League Leaders to Open 

Battle Royal With 

White Sox. 



Leverett, Warner, Allen and 

Bob Unglaub Starring 

for Bronks. 



HONUS WAGNER. 



run for St. Louis. New York's only 
chance to score came in the seventh, 
when with one down, Cree got the 
only hit made off Hamilton. He was 
caught off first, though, and Chase 
filed out, retiring the visitors. Score: 

R. H. E. 

New York 00000000 — 1 1 

St. Louis 2 0\:i 2 1 X— 5 9 

Batteries — Ford and Sweeney; Ham- 
ilton and Agnew. Umpires — Hilde- 
brand and Evans. 



Batting Bee. 

Chicago, May 22. — Boston defeated 
Chicago. 10 to 9, in an exciting batting 
bee yesterday. Benz started for Chi- 
cago, but was wild and retired in favor 
of Lange. Ray Collins had everything 
his own way until the sixth Inning 
when he began to show signs of weak- 
ening and before the ninth Inning was 
over he was driven from the box. Be- 
dien't was sent in, but he failed and 
Wood was called upon to save the 
game for the visitors with two out and 
the bases full. He proved equal to the 
occasion by throwing Borton out at 
first. The game was full of brilliant 
catches by both sides, but the greatest 
of all was the running one-hand stab 
by Speaker, who chased to the score 
board and robbed J. Collins of what 
looked like a sure home run. Score: 

■D TJ IT* 

Boston 2 4 1 3 0— lO'll' 1 

Chicago 00 002 106 — 9 14 2 

Batteries — R. Collins, Bedlent. Wood 
and Carrigan; Benz, Lange and Schalk. 
Umpires — Ferguson and Connolly. 

Win In'lenth. 

Cleveland, Ohio, May 22. — Washing- 
ton won yesterday's game in the tenth 
inning, scoring two runs on hits by 
Milan and Morgan, Gregg's wild throw 
and a sacrifice fly. In a ninth inning 
rally, Williams went in as pinch hitter 
and hit a home run, driving in the two 
runs that tied the score. Walter John- 
son then went in to pitch for Washing- 
ton, and held Cleveland scoreless In the 
tenth Inning. Kahler held Washington 
to two hits until the seventh when 
Shanks doubled and Henry's fly was 
lost In the sun, scoring the visitors' 
first run. Shortstop Chapman accepted 
ten chances without an error. Score: 

R. H. E. 

Cleveland 0000 10 1100 — 8 12 2 

Washington ..0000001022—5 9 8 

Batteries — Kahler, Gregg and Car- 
Isch; Johnson, Groom and Henry, Will- 
iams. Umpires — OLoughlin and Hart. 



Talk about the hard luck that has 
been woven Into the fabric of the lo- 
cal baseball situation — well. It la only 
necessary to state that since the team 
has come home seven games have 
been postponed because of rain. And 
weather conditions have been suffi- 
ciently aggravating to necessitate the 
calling off of some of the other games, 
had it not been for the fact that the 
local association directors were so 
anxious to get some of the games In. 

The present schedule was ratified 
over the heads of the local officials, 
but that is done and past. The fact 
is that the members cf the Duluth 
club have dropped $360 .i rain guar- 
antees alone, and there ue a multi- 
tude of expenses in adci:t)on to the 
good money that the direoijrs of the 
Sox are compelled to pay out to the 
visiting team upon the di/y It fails to 
play. 

Minneapolis, the league leaders, will 
open a three-game series here tomor- 
row. Friday, Saturday and Sunday are 
three of the best baseball days of the 
week and with fair weather the 
Bronchos should draw the best three- 
day attendance since the opening of 
the season. Good fans should get out 
and show their appreciation of the 
hard luck that has struck those back- 
ing the baseball team. 

Minneapolis at the present time is 
playing the fastest baseball in the 
new league. In the series here — al- 
ways with due deference to the mood 
of the weather — Duluth fans will see a 

held St Paul to four hits, no runs be- 
ing made off him. Rkger shut out 
Louisville for eight innings, but eased 
up In the ninth, when two runs were 
made on Osborne's triple, an error by 
O'Rourke and Nlehoff's double, .^^ore: 

Louisville 00 00 00 2—2 7' 2 

St Paul 42000000 x— 6 8 1 

Batteries — Maddox, Northrop and 
demons; Rieger and Miller. Umpires 
— Johnstone and Connolly. 

JACK M'GARTHY 

GIVEN RELEASE 



team that has been compared most fa- 
vorably with the Minneapolis Ameri- 
can association team. Some of the 
critics of Minneapolis are disposed to 
say that tlie Little Millers are at the 
present time playing a better game 
than the bunch of misfits representing 
the large city in the A. A. race. 
Four Star Twlrlera. 

Cantillon has Leverett. Comstock- 
Lelivelt, Sherrin — four of the best 
twirlers in the league, and to back 
this twirling quartet up the Little 
Millers have a fast and hard-hitting 
aggregation. 

In young Brlere at shortstop, Can- 
tillion Is said to have a wonderful 
young ball player, a player who Is 
slated for the Mlrineapolis American 
association team at the end of the 
present season. 

Bob Unglaub, manager of the team. 
Is playing third base and Is whaling 
the ball for fair. Warner at first Is a 
player who received his training with 
the American association team thla 
spring, and 1b one of the best hitters 
In the league. Allen, behind the bat, 
is generally admitted to be the best 
backstop in the league. Last season he 
was with the Millers all of the sea- 
son, and he will undoubtedly return 
to the A. A. at the end of the present 
season. Allen is a youngster and is 
possessed of a wonderful whip. 

Cosgriff, Doyle and Chase make up 
the outfield. Grodrlck Is on the sec- 
ond bag. This combination has been 
playing real baseball since the open- 
ing of the season and during the three 
games here — always ■with due defer- 
ence to the mood of the weather — It Is 
expected that the fans of Duluth will 
be given an exhibition of some of the 
best baseball that we have witnessed 
during the present season. 

The gay soiree with Minneapolis will 
bring us to the end of the stay of the 
Dooks. As has been remarked before 
rain has cut down the number of games 
scheduled for the home paten. The 
series starting tomorrow should prove 
the battle royal of the season, as the 
Dooks are going to make a mighty ef- 
fort to cop three straight from the 
fast-going visitors. 

Bob Unglaub, the manager of the 
visitors, was a former member of the 
Boston Red Sox, and also the Washing- 
ton Americans. He is still a grand ball 
plaver, as is proven by his hitting, the 
Minneapolis leader at the present time 
practically leading the league with the 
cudgel. 



time more than anything else. The 
pitchers are wild and need steadying 
and this calls upon the exptritnce of 
an older backstop than Flschel. 

PLAYERS READf 

FOR GOLF GAME 



Jack McCarthy was today handed his 

release by the commander of the White 

Sox. A hard worker and always striv- 

j Ing for the best interests of the club, 

! McCarthy failed somehow, according 

! to the opinion of O'Brien, to come up 

; to the standard of a receiver of h>s 

club, and the iittle blue slip was the 

inevitable result. . 

I With the coming of Wilke the club 

I will be provided with two receivers. 

I Flschel has all the ear marks of a 

I comer, but he lacks experience, and 

I wisdom behind the bat Is something 

that the team wants at the present 



Duluth golf players are gayly look- 
ing forward to Saturday when the 1&18 
season will be formally ushered In at 
the Northland links. This will be the 
formal opening of ihe season and the 
first regulation match game of the 
present year will be ylayed. 

During all of the present week the 
crack players of tlie club have been 
out on tiie links, and this despite the 
rain. Willie Lelth has been busy coach- 
ing and when the first contest is called 
it is expected that some of the player* 
of the club will be in grand condition. 



Will Not Compete. 

Bristol, R. I., May 22.— "Nat" Her- 
reshoff. designer and builder of t-he 
successful defenders of the America's 
cup for the last twenty years, has de- 
clined tentatively to enter a competi- 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 



Won. 

Philadelphia 19 

Cleveland 21 

Washington 18 

Chicago 20 

Boston 14 

St. Louis 15 

Detroit 12 

New York 9 



Lost. 

9 
12 
11 
14 
18 
21 
21 
22 



Pf-t. 
.679 
.636 
.621 
.688 
.488 
.417 
.364 
.290 



AMERICAN ASSN. 



Won. 

Columbus 19 

Milwaukee 19 

Kansas City 20 

Louisville 18 

i Indianapolis 14 

'Minneapolis 14 

St. Paul '....IS 

Toledo 11 



Lost. 


Pet. 


11 


.633 


15 


.559 


16 


.656 


16 


.629 


14 


.BOO 


16 


.4(!7 


18 


.419 


22 


.333 



Yesterday'i* Re«ul<». 

Washington. 5; Cl.'veland. 3. 
St. Louis, 5; New York, 0. 
Boston, 10; Chicago, 9. 

Pitches One-Hit Game. 

St Louis, Mo., Ma.y 22. — Errorless 
hall on St. Louis' part, and wonderful 
pitching by Hamilton, the young left- 
hander defeated New York yesterday. 
5 to 0. The visitors made only one 
hit and only one man reached second 
base. The home team began scoring in 
the first inning, Williams' triple 
bringing In Shotten and Brief's single 
scoring Williams. Both pitchers were 
airtight until the sixth when a double 
by Shotten and singles by Johnston 
and Pratt scored two runs. Three 
singles in the sever th made the fifth 



ARROW SHIRTS 




are made in every style likely 
quired for city and country 
wear-resisting fabrics that 
lutely fast 
color. 

$1.50 
Up. 



to be re- 
wear— in 
are abso- 



CImH. Nibedy & Co., 

IM. 

Tror, «. T. 

Maktrt of UIOV 

COLUM 




Yeirterday's Rettnlts. 

Columbus, 3, 5; Kansas City, 2, 6. 
St. Paul, 6; Louisville, 2. 
• 

Divide Doubie-Header. 

Kansas City, Mo., May 22.— Columbus 
and Kansas City divided a double- 
header here yesterday, the visitors 
winning the first game, 3 to 2, and 
losing the second, 6 to 5. Powell's 
wildness gave the firs' game to the 
visitors, while bunched hits in the sec- 
ond permitted Kansas City to win. 

In the first game Kansas City got 
a lead of two runs in the third on 
Walker's single, Carr's double and 
Drake's single. Powell was steaming 
along nicely until wildness got him in 
a hole in the sixth. After two were out 
in that Inning Powell walked Perring 
and Hinchman and both scored on 
Miller's double. Columbus put across 
the winning run In the eighth on 
Shelton's single, an Infield out and 
Perrlng's single. 

Hlnchman's home run in the first 
inning of the second game with the 
bases full made the case look black for 
Kansas Cltv and Waters added another 
run In the "fifth on a base on balls, a 
single and a double steal. The locals, 
however, came strong in the home half 
of the fifth, scoring four runs on a 
base on balls, singles by Walker and 
Carr and Drake's home run. In the 
seventh Kansas City clinched the game 
with a base on balls, Walker's triple 
ard Krichell's Texas leaguer. 

First game — R. H. E. 

Columbus 2 10—3 5 1 

Kansas City 2 0—2 9 1 

Batteries — Cook. McQuillan and 
Smith; Powell and O'Connor. Umpires 
— Chill and O'Brien. 

Second game — R. H. E. 

Columbus 40001000 0—5 7 1 

Kansas Cltv . . .0 4 2 x— G 9 2 

Batteries — Cole and Smith; Vaughn, 
Schlltzer and Krichell. Umpires — Chill 
and O'Brien. 



Play One Game. 



St. Paul, Minn.. May 22— St. Paul 
won yesterday from Louisville. C to 2, 
in the first game of a scheduled double- 
header. The second was postponed be- 
cause of cold weather. 

Maddox, who started pitching for 
I..ouisville, was knocked out of the 
box, the home team making six runs 
off his dellvorv In less th^jn tv/i; in . 
uiuKB. Northrop succeeded him and i 




KNOWN THE 



WORLD OVER 



ALL around you, 
there are men who 
are shaving with the new 
Gillette Blades. Finest 
ever made, they will 
tell you. 

Two sizes of Packet— 6 Blades (12 
shaving edges), 50 cents: 12 Blades 
(24 shaving edges), $1.00. Buy a 
Packet today. 

GILLETTE SAFETY RAZOR COMPANY. BOSTON 



^ 



m 



i 



■■■MM 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 22, 1913. 



13 



t- 



^r thf floslRn of tho 1914 de- 

it was learneii last night. 

Mr Herrtshoff did not care to 

!s rt-sarding his un- 

...» ont- of tJi>.» sevonty- 

, i s. It was said that he 

of th»- rtrat to plan a 

•*» tiie walor should 

• in i»rove auoct "s^ful 









K».(. ll^KIt t»M> FORM. ^ 

■au tke \ortllMr«« im Krnrral arr Jt^ 

takJa^ a «rr«| lalrreal ia llannrM «^ 

K »<*>»*>■«'■ ■' tl*«- prrfieBi ilaar. i^ 

«■!«»• ■■•••uar«>4 lliai tl»r KFvat- ^ 

r«« r««B«-r ta Ibr ktotwr; »f all tkr * 

■••rM. ••< r«rm rsc>r9<iM« \lfrrd -t 
«kr«kk. I* !• r*«-e %lk«' Kl« lat. 

• Ike «i>r«« \e«< % vrk l»*y- 

• »«lt r«-rra(l> tkr iireat Klaa « 
•• .«• ik«- wia^ia*^ Maraik^a rarr 

• a %m \»rh. r«t>. Thr dlMtaat-r 
• •* t'2 '^ Millr*. aad the t«wa«ler- 

'■•S I- laa «-a«rr«-4 Ikr ilia- 4t 

.. r la S aMaaIra aad 4.% ■•r«-«a4|i itt 

Uwa (haa fke prr«to«a rr^ord. « 
Tlite •^•••a ih« mmmdi^rlml (arm H(f 
l»a»»>twalara la raaalas la at tli«- it 

Ib IMa rarv mrrv a*air of thr -^ 
raaa«T« la fkr mi>rl«l, la- i- 
<.aa(»a «itraklaa. aa<i >rt * 
f aa > laa rfeic-atrd tlila » 
AeM aa4 flalakr^ aa atroaK ^ 



Stovall. manager of the St. Louis 
American league baselmll club, sus- 
pended three v\e»'ks ago. did n»t he- 
come known yesterday. President 
Johnson of the American leasue. who 
had announced that he would make the 
.stovall verdict pabUc ytat.-rday. was 
111 and di«l not visit his oftice. Stovail 
has been out of the game three weeks 
ror his dispute with Umpire Fergu.son. 



and the United States army is well rep- 
resented. 

Rain, which f.ll last night, had made 
the track a trlile heavy, l>ut the foot- 
ing, it was tliought, would Improve as 
I the day wore on. Two boxes were re- 
' .served for President Wilson and mem- 
I bers of his family. 



Fmb mi Kmwh. 



. V. 



T"n«» f.4ti» Af r;.>ori. 



STEVE GARDNER TO 

MEET CANADIAN PUG. 

Steve C:ardncr J. ft for Port Aithur 
todav. where he Is matched to fight 
Kl.l Llovd. The l>uluth boy has agreed 
to makt 14(» pound.s ringside for the 
Head of the Canadian I.rtike3 crack and 
is confident of winning. 

.\ccordlnt; to the announcement 

!,- has changed managers and has 

,fn Hwav from his former manager. 

, .^iit at llie present time the husky 

ith voungster is going at the best 

, he has shown since he started 

.:ing. He is learning more of the 

p.iints of the came, is using his 

mor.-. and is becoming faster on 

feet. 

SOCIETY OUT FOR 

OPENING RACE MEET. 

Washington. May 22. — Society was 
out In force at historic Hennings track 
todav long before the bugle called tiie 
tirst field of thoroughl)reds together m 
the opening race of tlie Washington 
Hiding & Hunting clubs annual meet. 
Racing will continue until Saturday. 
Horses from many cities and from 
nianv noted .-^tables have been entered 




r.iie 
l.fl 
his 



^s^MSi^wm^m^Mm 



^^ 



eW' *~*.3*»> 



iV 



=^' 



Phlladtlnhla. viuy 22. 
I batted and outfielded the University of 
1 Pennsylvania was fortunate in hunch- 
ing their hits and defeated the Ford- 
ham baseball team yesterday by the 
score of 3 to 2. .Score: R. H. F.. 

Fordham 2 0—2 7 2 

Pennsylvania ..2 000000 Ix — » 4 4 
Batteries — Williams and Vivlano; 
Sayre and Koons. 

• • • 

New Haven, Conn., May 22. — 'i ale. 
playing a fine, uptiill ^ame, defeated 
Brown In an exciting contest yester- 
day by « to 4. making the sixteenth 
consecutive victory for the Blue and 
the second win over Brown this sea- 
sun. 

• • a 

Annapolis, Md., May 2.'. — Taking the 
lead In tlie first inning and holding 
the visitors practically at their mercy. 
Navy yesterday defeated Notre Dame, 
(ind.), university by 7 to 1. 
a • a 

Ithaca. N. Y., May 22. — Michigan won 
a hard-fought game from Cornell In 
the tenth inning yesterday. 5 to 3. Cor- 
nell made two of lis scores on errors 
alone. 

• • a 

Madl.son, Wis.. May 22. — University 
of Wisconsln-Ciiicago game postponed, 
wet grounds. 

• * * 

St. Paul, Minn., May 22. — McAlester, 

2; Concordia, 1. 

rrbana. 111., May 22.— Purdue. 2; Il- 
linois, 7. 

• • • 

Easton. Pa., Mav 22. — Albright, 9; 

11; 0. LaFayette, 4; 8; 4. 

— a- — 

Wister and Denny. 

Wister and Denny yesterday won 
over Lynott and Thompson at handball 
on the Y. M. C. A. courts by the score 
of 21 to 1 and 21 to 0. The games 
were too one aided to prove of inter- 
est. 



*'The wagon that stands up like 

the reputation of its makers'* 

When you buy a StudehaJ^er wagon you buy 
a wagon that will last until you turn the farm 
over to your son and he turns it over to his son. 

One of the first StuJeha^er wagons ever made saw 
constant service for thirty years, and we will gladly 
send you the names of farmers who have in their 
possession wagons that have been in constant use any- 
where from 17 to 48 years — and there are thousands of 
them. We are building the same kind of wagons today. 

A Studebaker wagon is an investment that will give 
you full return for your outlay. It is built on honor. 
Iron, steel, w^ood, paint and varnish used in its construc- 
tion cire tested an d retested to make sure each is the best. 

For work, business or pleasure — for town or country 
use — there is a S/uc/e&oi^er vehicle to fit your requireme nts. 

Farm vragons, dump carts, trucks, buggies, surreys, run- 
abouts, pony CArriages, business vehicles of every description—* 
with haumess of the same high staiKlard. 

See our Dealer or write us. 

STUDEBAKER South Bend, Ind. 

NEW YORK CHTCAGO DALLAS KANSAS Crrv DENVER 

M:N>rEAPOLIS SALT LAKE CITY SAN FRANCISCO PORTLAND. ORE. 




"The Yellowstone is the 
only scenery in the world that 
comes up to it.s brag,' 

^ — Ra/p/i IValdo Emerson. 

J Nature Has Lavished Hef Gifts in the Region of 

Yellowstone 
Nationsd Park 

Natural forests, crystal rivers, gorgeous canyons, 
sparkling cascades and startling geysers all may be 
enjoyed and explained on the 158-mile drive around 
the circle. Spacious, homelike, comfortable inns 
await you at the end of each day. 

California passengers may visit the Park as a side 
trip from Salt Lake City or Ogden, passengers for 
Pacific Northwest from Pocatello, Idano. 

The side trip is made most economically if ar- 
ranged at the time of purchasing through ticket. 

Union Pacific 

Thm New and Direct Route 

Dustless, well ballasted roadbed — heavj' double tracks — fewest 
curves — lowest grades — Automatic Electric Block Safety 
Signals. Excellent daily trains from Omaha. 

Greatly Reduced Round Trip Fares 

Daily, Jime 1st to Sept. 30th. Stop-over at Denver and Salt Lake 
City. Write for detailed information about the Park and the 
best way to see it. 

H. F. CARTER, District Passenger Agent 

Union Pacific R. R. Co. 

25 South Third Street Minneapolis, Minn. 



Salary Claim Denied, 

Cincinnati, oliio. May 22. — Tiip na- 
tional baseball commission yesterday 
upheld a decision of the national board 
in refu.sing to allow Player M. W. 
Whitnevs claim for twelve day.s' sal- 
ary against the Topeka club of the 
Western league. The testimony showed 
the player refused to report to the 
Topeka club on account of the terms 

offered him. 

• ■ 

Defeated at Tennis. 

Annapolis, Md., May 22.— University 
of Michigan's tennis players yesterday 
administered the ttrst defeat to the 
navy team that they have suffered this 
season. The vlstors took three of the 
four sets of singles and one of the 
two strings of doubles. 

WILL DiSTRJBUfE 

FREE TICKETS 



Committee Is Named to 

Handle "Lark 0' the Lake" 

Admission Cards. 

Tickets for the Lark o' the Lake at 
Duluth will be handled by thirty-two 
Duluth men, representative of thirty- 
two diff»»rent lines of business. Each 
man will visit all the houses In his 
line, and make an allotment of 
tickets, and a sufficient number is ex- 
pected to be sold to defray the ex- 
penses of the entertainments. 

The tickets will be Issued with the 
understanding that they are to be for 
free di-stribution to the visitors to Du- 
luth. The L.ark o' the I>ake at Du- 
luth will be essentially a show for 
the out-of-town visitors and every 
effort will be made to see that the 
people wlio come from out of the city 
are properly entertained. 

Following are the men appointed to 
take charge of the tickets for each 
branch of business: 

Banks, J .\V. Lyder: brewers. Col. A. 
X. Schall; brokers, L,ewis H. Merrltt: 
cigar manufacturers, W. H. Kehtel; 
cigar dealers, Harris Bennett; cloth- 
ing, A. L. Allien; coal, Chris Tweed; 
grain commission, .1. H. Barnes; pro- 
duce commission. Vern Culbertson; d<*- 
partment stores, W. B. Brlnkman; drug- 
gists. \V. A. Abbett: drygoods, .Toseph 
Cldding; electrical apparatus, William 
Burgeas; express companies, George 
Kennedy; furniture, R. R. Forwaid: 
grocers, George H. Scliulenberg; hard- 
ware, R. D. Annis; hotels, W. F. Mc- 
Kav; jewelers, G. A. Klein; laundries, 
.1 T Armstead: lumber, C. H. Bradley; 
bar, H. T. Abbott; Wolvin building, J. 
H. Hoarding; paint and painters, H. 
H. Bnrgen; photographers, .T. R. Zweif- 
(\: plumbers. Frank Farrell; printers, 
W. .T. Betting: publishers, William F. 
ilenrv: saloons, W. A. Wagner; shoes, 
<ieorge J. Nichols; cedar products, 
Tom Bradley; meats (wholesale*, Sam 
P'isher. 



2S»> 



FOU ND GUI LTY. 

But lohn Miller is Recommended to 
Mercy of the Court. 

John Miller was convicted of robbery 
In the first degree by a jury in dis- 
trict court before Judge Dancer yes- 
terday afternoon. The verdict of 
guilty waa agreed upon after the case 
had b^'en in the jury's hands for more 
than six hours. The jurors recom- 
mended the prisoner to the mercy of 
tiie court. 

On the evening of March 8, Miller 
held up and robbed Gust Johnson, 
woodsman, of $37, a watch and a knife. 
The robbery took place on Michigan 
street near the Union depot. Miller is 
said to have had an accomplice, who 
escaped from the police. 

The jury returned its verdict shortly 
after 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon. 

GIRL HOLDS UP AUTO, 

Forces Chauffeur in Omaha to Help 
Her Escape Mother. 

Omaha, Neb.. May 22.— Viola Elms, 
a 19-year-old girl of Plains, Kan., held 
up the chauffeur of a passing automo- 
bile In the downtown district and 
forced him to drive to a suburb In or- 
der that she might escape from her 
mother. 

Miss Bims came to Omaha recently 
to escape, she declared, from her step- 
father. Shft was placed In the Good 
Sheperd home here until her mother 
could reach the city. Tuesday evening 
the mother went to the home and the 
daughter started with her to the sta- 
tion, apparently satisfied. When tliey 
reached Thirteenth and Dodge streets, 
the young woman ran into the street, 
stopped the driver of an automobile at 
the point of a revolver, and jumped 
into the car. She held the revolver at 
his head until they reached Fiftieth 
and Bacon streets, where she made her 
escape. 

NEGRGGUILtv OF 

E NTICI NG GIRLS. 

Dubuque, Iowa, May 22. — Louis 
(Dude) Christopher, a negro, 52 years 
old, was convicted yesterday of entic- 
ing white girls under 15 years, or the 
age of consent. The penalty is life 
iuiyrisonment. 



MUST TAKE 
OUT LICENSES 

Commission on Trail of De- 
linquents and Will Col- 
lect Fees. 



Old Bill Against City Paid- 
Opposition to Saloon 
Ordinance. 



Pawnshops, second-hind shops and 
pool and billiard halls cannot operate 
in Duluth without paying for their li- 
censes. Tlie old dodge of making the 
application and then forgetting to pro- 
c<'ed further will no longer be toler- 
ated, nor will tlie fact that in one or 
two instances not even that much lias 
been done, be overlooked. 

City Clerk C. S. Palmei' informed Com- 

misloner Ilicken, head of the division of 
public safety, at the commission meet- 
ing yesterday afternoon that applica- 
tions several weeks old are still 'n the 
tiles of his office. The> represent fees 
of appro.ximately $1,500 which should 
go to the city treasury. The pawn- 
brokers pay $11'5 a year, tlie .second- 
hanu .stores, $10 and the pool and bil- 
liaid tables, $5 each. 

Commissioner Hicken stated tliat the 
police will 'inmedlately inform the de- 
linquents that if the licenses are not 
taken out at once they will be arrested 
for running In violation of the ordi- 
nance and their establishments closed. 
The poller have been furnished with a 
list of those who haven't paid and are 
notifying each of them today of the ul- 
timatum. 

Pay Old Dill. 

The commission, auth jrlzed the pay- 
ment of a bill of $;;,5S2.04. handed 
down by the old water and light board. 
The money represents cash which was 
advanced by the Zenttli Furnace com- 
pany for the extension of a gas feeder 
in Fifty-eighth avenue west, In 1910. 
lender the agreement the city paid no 
interest on the sum advanced. It was 
stated that the bill Wfia a just claim 
against the city. 

Ruben Johnson, secretary of the 
civil service board, informed the com- 
mission of the board 3 organization 
with W. B. Getchell as; president and 
himself as secretary. As the chaiter 
made no provision for a secretary -of 
the civil service boanl the board laid 
the matter before the city commission. 
It was stated that if the merit system 
Is adopted the secretary of the civil 
service board will be required to de- 
vote his entire time to the *work. In 
the past the secretary has also been 
secretary of the health commission- 
er. The matter was referred to Com- 
inission»»r Hicken, who will take It up 
with the civil service board and the 
health director. 

OppOMition to Oriliuanee. 

The ordinance eliminating brewery 
control of saloons, cutting out pool 
and billiard tables, ganbling devices, 
music, free lunches and eating places 
In saloons was given i"3 second read- 
ing. When it comes up for passage at 
the next meeting, which will probably 
be ne.vt Monday afternoon, opposition 
to the ordinance will develop. At least 
some of the commissioners are of the 
opinion that to wipe out brewery sa- 
loons at one sweep Is too radical, as 
It will deprive the g«^neral fund of 
$75,000 to $100,000 of revenue at one 
sweep. It will also be amended so 
that chop houses will not be Illegal In 
saloons, although the free lunches and 
music will probably We barred. 

The ordinances appropriating $7,000 
for water and gas extensions and $10,- 
000 for sidewalks were advanced by 
second readings. The toothless ordi- 
nance pretending to provide a means 
for compelling the attjndance of ab- 
sent members of the commission was 
passed. The measure is so Innocuous 
and harmless and woulii be so useless 
should a crisis arise in wliich it should 
be neces.sar.v to comiel attendance 
that It Is little better than a joke. 

The First Presbyterian church Sun- 
day school wa.'* granted a permit for a 
pyrotechnical display on Minnesota 
point July 4. It will be under the 
supervision of the fire warden. 

A petition was receh ed for the Im- 
provement of Helm street between 
Twenty-sixth and Tventy-eighth ave- 
nues west. 



RETIRES ON P ENSION. 

Officer ''Bob" Johnston Has Served 
the City Twenty-Two Years. 

The pension board of the Police Re- 
lief association yestei'day afternoon 

granted the api)lication of Robert C. 
.Johnston to retire on a pension of $10 
per month. Mr. Johnston has been 
serving as telephone operator for sev- 
eral years pasit. Previous to that he 
was jailer for a number of years -Jnd 
vC'hen he joined the firce he served 
fourteen years as a palrohnan. June 1 
he will have completed twenty-two 
years and one nionth o i the i)olice de- 
partment. He is 66 years of age. 



Dumplings 

For Soups, Stews and Fricarteed Chicken 

Left overs of roast lam-), veal or beef, 
the cheaper cuts of fresh cieats, and fowls 
too old for roasting, maki delicious and 
nourishing stews. K C Dumplings mtike 
them doubly attractive and the whole dish 
is most economical — an object to most 
families while meats are so high and must 
be made to go as far as possible. 

K C Dum{)lings 

By Mrs. Nevada Briggs, the well known 
baking expert. 

2 cups flour; 3 level teaapoonfula K C 
Baking Powder; J teaspoonful salt; J 
cup shortening; milk or cream. 

Sift tog^ether three times, 
flour, baking powder and j; 
into this work the shortening 
and use cream or milk 
make a dough less stiff thjin 
biscuits. 




Allow the stew to boll down so that the 
liquid does not cover the inett or chicken. 
Add half a cup of cold water to stop its boil- 
ing and drop the dough in large spoonfuls on 
top of the meat or chicken. Cover and let 
boil again for IS minutes. 

Made with K C Baking Powder and 
steamed in this way, duntplings are as light 
as biscuits and are delicious with tliickened 
gravy. 

This recipe is adapted fron one for Chicken 
Pot Pie in "The Cook's Book" by Janet 
McKenzic Hill, editor of t:ie Boston Cook- 
ing School Magazine. The book contains 
90 excellent recipes for tHutgs that are good 
to eat and that help reduce he cost of living. 

*'The Cook's Book" Sint free for the 
colored certificate packed in" every 25-cent 
can of K C Baking Powdw. Send to Jaques 
Mfg. Co., Chicago. ^ 



LICENSES FOR 
TOBACCONISTS 

New Cigarette Law May 

Condemn All Tobacco 

as ''Makings." 



Attorney General Puzzled 

as to Full Scope of 

Recent Act. 



There Is a possibility that every to- 
bacco dealer in the state may be com- 
pelled to come under the provision of 
the cigarette license law. whether ho 
sells cigarettes or not. The cigarett.' 
license law was passed by the last leg- 
islature. 

The question was put up to Attorney 
<Jenerai Smith the other day and In- 
volved an Interpretation of a provision 
of the law which directs that dealers 
In cigarettes, cigarette papers and to- 
bacco used In the manufacture of cig- 
arettes shall be licensed. The puz- 
zling featuie of the law is that oor- 
tioii of It relating to tobacco used in 
the niHking or manufacturing of cig- 
arettes. 

There are a thousand brands of to- 
bacco on the marltet which can be 
used for cigarettes and Attorney Gen- 
trul Smith, having no knowledge of 
what kind of tobacco is necessary In 
making cigarettes, was somewhat puz- 
zled as to the answer wliich he will 
make to the question which has been 
put up to him. 

All BraadN >1ay He Ineliideri. 

If he answeies the question in tlio af- 
fii'niative, possibly every brand and 
grade of tobacco, whether in the leaf 
oi- granulated form, will come undei 
the provisi<jns of the law. The idea 
of including cigareltf tobacco was to 
take lare of the "makings," and pos- 
sibly all kinds of tobacco, unless it be 
the chewing variety, come under this 
head. 

The fee exacted under the cigarette 
license law is $25 every two years, and 
stiould the question propounded to the 
attorney geneial be answered in thf' 
affirmative, it will mean that thousands 
f)f dollars will be paid into the munici- 
pal and county treasury. Every dealer 
in Minnesota will be compelled to pay 
the license fee wliether he sells cigar- 
ettes or not. 



WILL OPERATE GAS 
ENGINE PLANT HERE 



Duluth will soon be the home of ;in- 
other family, the head of which will be 
one of the Important factors in thr- 
construction work at the new steel 
plant. His name Is C. E. Simpson, and 
he Is being brought to Duluth from 
Joliet, 111., to construct and operate 
the gas engine plant at the steel 
works, as he is considered an export 
in this line. Concerning him thi- 
Herald of Joliet, 111., said in its Issue 
of May 19: 

"C. C. Sampson, M. E.. engineer In 
charge of the operation of the gas en- 
gine plant at the Illinois Steel com- 
pany for the past two years, has been 
transferred to the Duluth plant of the 
corporation, where he will have charge 
of the construction and operation of a 
similar plant that Is being Installed 
there. He will leave with his family 
this week for his new position. 

"Mr. Sampson came here In 1911 from 
South Chicago, where he had charge 
of the gas engine work there. He 
erected and continued In charge of the 
plant here. He has been w'ith the cor- 
poration for the past seven years, be- 
ing with the National Packing company 
previous to that time. 

"He iff regar'ded as one of the most 
efficient engineers In his chosen line. 
In the country, and is rated very high 
by the officials of the steel company. 
He is one of the few men in the coun- 
try having a thorough knowledge of 
this work, the erection and operation 
of the gas engines that are being in- 
stalled in the dllTerent plants of the 
United States Steel corporation. 

"Mr. Sarnp.son obtained his training 
In the Armour- institute, Chicago, and 
was a gr*aduate of the class of lOOi. 
He is married and has two children.' 



STATE DROPS 



BOBBERY CASE 



Chief Witness Tells Con- 
fused Story to the 
Jury. 

Gus Hermanson's story of how hf 
had been assaulted and robbed of about 
JSO by Axel Makinen In a Floodwood 
booze joint on March 10 last was not 
borne out by testimony of the state'.- 
witnesses at the trial of Makinen, 
which began yesterday. County Attor- 
ney Warren E Greene asked the court 
to dismiss the case, which was done. 

Judge Dancer stated that the motion 
to dismiss would, be granted without 
any hesitation. In view of the fact that 
it would hardly be possible for a Jury 
to convict the prisoner on the evidence 
which had betn given by the state's 
witnesses. Hermarrsorr, it appears, had 
been drinking on the day of the al- 
leged robberj'. On the witness stan<l 
he told a confused story which received 
little corroboration from the other wit- 
nesses for the state. 



DESERT MYSTERY 
PUT UP TO BRYAN 



Accomplished Musicians 

Die in Alluring Garden 

of Allah. 

Chicago, III.. May 22. — International 
cf.mpllcatlons are threatened as a re- 
sult of the French government's re- 
fusal to surrender the body of Miss 
May Allport, the Chicago girl who died 
a lonely death at Sfax, Frencli Africa, 
on the edge of the Sahara. 

Dr. Walter H. Allport of Chicago, 
brother of the young artist, has ap- 
pealed to Secretary of State Bryan to 
demand the surrender of his sister's 
body. Dr. Allport declared that he 
would go to any length to recover the 
remains. 

An extraordinary parallel to the 
Allport tr-agedy is found In the death 
of Mrs. Hugo Manafeldt of San Fran- 
cisco, who died near Tunis, Algiers, on 
April 25. 1913. 

The cable from the American consul 
In Marseilles, France, to the state de- 
partment at Washington said, "Her 
death was dne to poison; details will 
follow." Nothing further has been 
heard. Mrs. Mansfeldt's last letter to 
her husband was written on April 10. 
The news of her death was cabled on 
April 26. 

The parallel goes further than the 
mere coincidence of deatii on the bor- 
der of the desert. Iioth Miss Allport 
and Mrs. Manafeldt were accomplished 
musicians and both were lured to the 
scenes of the Garden of Allah by tlielr 
artistic teinperameuts, Thoy died 



ReadHii 



The Following 
letter Appeared 

_ in 

Colei^WeeMy 

^TApril 19-1913 •' 






f:.^tklSrfi 



saving 
ucks 



Ad- 

;tric 



RICA 



1CAC0 



^m!^^ 



Temperance and 
Prohibition 

LouisriLLE, Ky., March igi igij. 
EoiTon Collier's : 

IN YOUR dcpariment of "Bncktrat* 
and Bouquets" you sometimes display 
courage in printing adverse criticisms 
of what appears in your paper, and it 
occurred to me that it was barely possible 
that you might give space to such a criti- 
cism of a recent editorial. 

In commenting on a murder in New 
York by a man who had had several 
drinks, you express the wish that you 

Could bring about a slate where vo uews- 
f>a'Pcr or rtporter in a case lihe this would 
consider his Story complete until he had 
found out the brand of whisky that the 
murderer drank, and got the ncinte and 
photograph of the maker of it. 

Continuing, you «ay: 

There are a good many sad things about 
our civilisation, but few more discourag- 
ing than the fact that in Baltimore and 
Louisville men who make whisky and use 
all of the arts of trade to stimulate it^ 
consumption arc able, by virtue of thctr 
money, to escape the odium whtch at- 
taches to all others, like gamblers and 
panders who stimulate crime and profit 
by exploiting human vjcakness 

It occurs to me that your language is 
intemperatt and your reasoning unsound. 

I know of nothing, and I believe you 
know of nothing, that ia not subject to 
abuse. There it no denying that alcoholic 
beverafei may be used to excess, and 
there »» no denying that the freedom of 
the preia may: be »o mistised as to lower 
the standard of citizenship and cast odium 
upon an otherwise honored professioa' 



IN pandering to the prohiljitionists you 
art encouraging men and women to cx- 
cusi a cuilty man and to accuse the inno- 
cent. If the man who committed the 
murder was intoxicated, his intoxication 
was due to the excessive use of liquor. 
The man had deliberately overthrown his 
reason and had made himself a menace 
to society. 

He had the choice of being temperate 
or intemperate, and he became intemper- 
ate. In committing the murder he used 
a firearm. Firearms are subject to use and 
to abuse. 

Would you have the name and photo- 
graph of the maker of the firearm? 

It is conceded that the practice of carry- 
ing pistols is indirectly responsible for 
the majority of homicides, and yet I note 
that you do not strike from your adver- 
tising columns the remunerative advertise- 
ments of those who make it possible for 
men to carry concealed deadJy weapons. 
You would make fish of one and flcsli 
of another. 

In the case of firearms, you can sec 
that they are useful even though they may 
br wisuK^, but in the caso of liquor you 
profess to it^ nothing but the abuse, and 
yon wooidl pbcc llic blame for this abuse 
upon the maker 

Hcilhrr tlie distiller, nor the firearm 
■Mtft]. nor the manufacturer of the 
hutUltkff kntfe can follow his product to 
the uitlviate user and guarantee that there 
shafl be no abuse, and you will agree 
with me that the writer of an editorial 
cannot be expected to be willing to assume 
responsibility for the possilrle effect that 
that editoriaJ may have upon the »f ind of 
the reader . 

F. 

I KNOW c»f a CISC where nn cdilonal is 
supposed to have encouraged an assaSf 
$in, and yet. as a rule, editorials *rork for 
good, and there would be no sense in 
seeking to prohibit the writing of edi- 
iorialf on llic groiii>d thai cditonalf loinr- 
timfs work great harm 

A murder by a man who is under ihv 
influence of liquor is a strong nryunnnt 
for temperance. l>iil it doc> nf>i cxcuif 
the murderer, nor does it give hnn the 
right to shift th^ burden pf responnltility 
for his sin o^ mrempcr.nnre or his crimr 
of murder 

If the editor df Coi.tuR? should afiv«,. 
cMf Icmpefanct us such, and not iry 
to make the cjiuse of temperance cirry 
Ihe back-breaking burden of prohibition 
that does not prohibit, and which ts not 
intended to prohil)il. he could do a 
great work and merit the respect of him- 
self as well as of men who ha^e re- 
spect lor intellectual Jiitegrily 

T M GlLMORI 

Pres'idcHl pJatwnal Mcdfl Lice>ne Lcoitvc 



'MS&H 



tA ."•■* 



H 






s^-os^'^ 



within 150 miles of each other under 
very similar circumstances. 



MORE "SEERS" HIT 

BY^GRAND JURY. 

Chicago, May 22 — Indictments 
against live clairvoyants charged with 
obtaining, chiefly from women, sums 
ranging from small amounts up to 
$1,000 tor '"revealing the future." have 
been returned by the county grand 
Jury. "Prof." Mason, who, according 
to charg6i^ was on« of a gang of 



fortune tellers that harvested fortune* 
In Chicago under alleged collusion with 
certain police officials, was the only 
now naiuo mentioned In the indict- 
ments. All of the others had been pre- 
viously indicted. James Ryan, aMaa 
■*Prr>f." Charles T. Crane, wlio was 
arrest«d In Wyoming, is the only one 
apprehended. 

Immediately "Pon returning the bills 
the Jurors returned to consider charges 
that the police, through "shakedown 
men," collected money from the "crim*!* 
tru«t," of which the clairvoyants ar« 
allegetl to have b«en a part. 



1 '. 





■P 



Thursday, 




THE DULUTl] HERALD 



May 22, 1913. 



ON THE IRON RANGES 




OFFICIAL MAP OF THE WEATHER 



ANOTHER EVELETH 
BOYS' CLUB FORMED 

Swedish Baptist Minister 

Leader Aims to Keep 

Boys Off Street, 

Ev^-Ulli. Minn.. May 22.— (Special to 
The HiTuKI.)— Anotht-r boys' club, thf 
8.COIHJ In Kv^-ieth. Is aiding In the ho- 
lutlon of the prublem of ketplnfif the 
vounir bovs off the streets and traln- 

ng them itlong nioral. wholesome 1 ne». 
I'h!.- club has as Its leader. ^t-\. E 
» Veterson of the Swedish Baptist 
ehnrch. It Is at present composed of 
f.ftJe boys ranplng In ^S^\^^"»\}^^ 
to 15 vears. Saturday the boys and 
their leader visited the country and 
ijent a most enjoyable day hunting 
and fishlnB. <^»tto Frisk.-, a farmer 
flv :,K on the Miller Trunk road near 
iU Whiteface river, came in and took 

he bovB out in his wagon and when 
h" arrived home with th.m Mrs 
Kriske had a bountiful spread of good 
fhlngH lo eat and fresh milk to meet 
aVl^^•mand^^ which was fully m keep- 

nif with a small boys appetite. 

Bo>» ii***- »•'•■« '*'••."!:•, 

f 1 .. inb sp.nt the day fishing and 
-f, in the woods and came home 

:. . , L all agreed that It was a 

good time." The boys who en- 
...,. iht- outing were: «"*>«". I, J^ul. 
Alvln and B.nnie Damb. rg, "SN lllle 
Kri< k.«=on, Hjalmar and ^ erver I-ors- 
n.un. MUton I^t-andrr and Emil Larson 

N«-.\t Satuvdav evening the boys will 
have their meeting at the rtsuUnce of 
ir,Tii< nambt-rg. One boy will read a 
on 'The Condition of the Negro 
> the Civil War," another on 
"The Civil War' and the third boy a 
pap.r on "The Spanlsh-.Amerh an \\ ar. 
r.efreshint-nts and games will follow. 

HIBBINGCLUB~~ 

TO ENTERTAIN 



HEADS FIRE FIGHTERS 
FOR UMBER CONCERN 




A. F. THAYliR. 
I.ate chief of Virginia f'r^ depart- 
ment, who Is now chief of the fiie 
fighting brigade organized among the 
employes of the big Virginia ic Rainy 
Lake Lumber company's null. 



Ladies' Saturday Club Will 

Be Hosts to Their 

Husbands. 

Hibbing. Minn.. May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The annual banquet of 
the Ladies' Saturday club will be held 
this evening at the Knights of Colum- 
bus hall. Thlp is the one event of the 
club vear at which the husbands of the 
members of the club are privileged to 
te present. An attendance of about 
100 IS expected. 

The following program will be given. 
Violin solo. -Bereuse ■ from "Joselyn, 
Go.ldaid. Miss Arline Feachey; toast. 
"Our C.iiest.«.' Mrs. H.rbert Blair; The 
Club. Its Members," Rev. E. W. Klayer; 
vocal .«olo, litdouln Love Song, Fln- 
suiti. W. R. .<pen.«ley; "When -My Ship 
Comes In." Mrs. .lohn Trenerry; vocal 
solo "The Silver Rose,' Laymen, Mrs. 
William Tappan; "If I Were a Man. 
Ml-^s Wiley; violin solo, "Meditation of 
Thais," Mae.senet, Miss Arline ePachey: 
vocal duet, "The Rosary. " Nevin, J. P. 
Murpliy and VV. R. Spensley. 

Mrs. H H. Faust, president of the 
club will be loa.stmistress and Miss 
Marcella Lavelle and Ralph Marble, Jr., 
will be accompanists. 

MRS. miEY'^S FUNERAL 

Last Rites Held at Biwabik for Vil- 
lage Clerk's Wife. 



charge of Miss M. Feyerelsen, teacher 
of reaillng and expression in the 
schools. The cast follows: frin^^/'^s 
Ida, Ethel Blnney; Lady Pay. he and 
I^ady Bianclie, Instructors In univer- 
sity, Jennie Moe and Helia Abraham- 
son; Melissa, daughter of Lady 
Blanche, Arlene Hosklng; ^ lolet. a 
pupil. Blanche Fredrickson; printe, 
kenry Binney; Florian his ^V f "^.^n 
brother to Psyche. Arthur Hill; C> ri , 
friend to prince and Florian, John 
Downing; King Gama, father to prin- 
cess. Tony Indihar; Ipse, nobleman in 
Gama's court, William Medahe; cour- 
tiers' attendants, Tony Erchul and 
Flur Sullivan; ladles of the court, 
Carolyn Hegler and Dora Hegler; 
pages and others, sixteen pupils. 

MOTORCYCUSf 

BADLY INJURED 

Evelethian Collides With 
Biwabik Motorist, Re- 
ceiving Broken Leg. 

Eveleth, Minn., May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Ted Banks, the elec- 
trician who was injured recently by 
the collision of his motorcycle with 
an automobile, le at the Bray hospital 
in Biwabik, where he Is making a sat- 
isfactory recovery. He will not be 
able to resume his duties for several 
weeks, having sustained a serious 
tracture of the left leg as well as nu- 
merous minor bruises. The accident 
happened at night between Biwabik 
and .VicKlnley. The driver of the car, 
a Biwabik man, took the injured man 
in to the hospital. The motorcycle 
was completely demolished. 



CRETE MINING CO. 
SUED FOR $15,080 

Hibbing Man Asks That 

Sum for Injuries Received 

in Utica Mine. 

Virginia, Minn., May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Suit for $15,000 damages 
has been commenced by Mayor Victor 
L. Power of Hibbing in the district 
court for Dan Jurclch against Joseph 
iHvcich and Crete Mining company, 
operating the Ptlca open pit mine at 
HlbMng. The plaintiff was a Ma»tmaii 
at the mine and alleges he was Injured 
by a blast placed by Joseph Devcich 
and that the company did not proviUc 
the pUiintiff with a safe place in which 
to perform his duties. It Is asserted 
that his skull was crush, d, and his 

I eyesight, his hearing and his nerve.'- 

i were affected. 

Salt Over Keewatin Coutrart. 
One of the eases to be tried at the 
Hibbing term of the district court 
earlv in June, will be that of C' A. 
Remington vs. C. A. Kilander and \ Ic- 
tor Carlson, in business as C. A. Kil- 
ander & Co.. and the National buret y 
oompanv. The defendants erected the 
new school building at Keewatin and. 
The bill of complaint says, obtained ma- 

, terlal valued at $2,684.67 from th.> 
plaintiff, which has not been paid for. 
Mayor Power of Hibbing represents the 
plaintiff. ^ . „„ 

An appeal to the supreme court h.ns 
been taken in the case of Otto Nelson 
V8 Raari Bros, of Eveleth, involving 
$148 The defendants are Jacob ."^aari. 

mayor of Eveleth. a"^ J^^" ,^''^," "*.; 
Duluth. Nelson sued for $3.^7 for a 
horse and was awarded $148. Saari 
Bros, asked for a new trial and <>" J^^' 
Ing denied this, direct their attoi neys 
Larson & Loulsell of Duluth. to take 
the case to the supreme court. 



LIBRARIANS ARE 

VISITING RANGE 

Duluth and Superior Women 

Guests of U. S. Steel 

Corporation. 

Virginia, Minn., May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Miss Francis Earhart, 
librarian, of "Duluth and three assist- 
ants. Miss Roberts librarian, at Supe- 
rior and three assistants are visiting 
Virginia, Hibbing and Eveleth and 
other range mining towns today in a 
private car, the guests of the bteel 
torpoiation. . , 

J. H. Heardlng, assistant g^ri™ 
manager of the Oliver Iron Mining 
companv. is conducting the trip. Thej 
are obtaining first hand information 
about the mfnes for the betterment of 
library service to patrons in Duluth 
and Superior. Miss Mabel Newhard. 
librarian In Virginia, is with the party. 




FORECAST TIl-Ti 7 
I'llinAY 

For Puluth, Suiifri(ir *n<J vicinity, 
liicliulii.R the Ufttaba ami V»-riDtll(>ii 
Iron rniigps: Kalr weal her toiilitlit 
■ 1.(1 Kridaj'; vnarnier Filday; moJer- 
aie iintherly wlrdB, bectiuing >arl- 
able. 

EXPLANATORY NOTES. , 

■f,, ,. . ^,ri ,1 8 i.,i ^,«lT-fifth meridian time. . Air pr.saur, .^mo^ to Ma Icv.k I«,«An. («>.tii.oou. U«f) V^>-'>^'<><'f^^^"^'''^*T.':J:',T^Z' 

^!n .hrou%^^nU of * uaTI."^^^^ Jrawa only for x*!o, fr«ri-g. »«■>. -4 lOtT. Q clear © partly cloudy; « o^dj , R ~». 

f" K "r^Fi^flJirc. cmperalL; ^oo.,.l, p.^cipit^lon of .01 iach or mo^ .. yaat 24 bour,; th,r.rmaxi-m w,ad rek.oty. _ 



ItOTBaUB (doKtd Vittt) 
S »DC*; M rtpor*. mbai^r A»o«i fly wiiW 




Biwabik. Minn., May -2.— "Special to 
The Herald.)— The funeral of the late 
MrF. J. E. Riley, wife of the village 
clerk, who died at her home on Can- 
ton avenue, t^unday morning, was lield 
Tuefdav morning from the St. Josephs 
Catholic church. Rev. Father feallock 
officiating, interment bt-lng at the Bi- 
wabik cemetery. The pallbearers were: 
Louis Sagnuco. D. J. Eyer. H. H. Sal- 
mon. J. J. Kelley and D. J. Hogan. 

Those who attended the services 
from out of town were: P. L. Riley of 
Atlantic. Iowa: T. J. Riley, Spooner, 
\Vis ; Mrs. Charles Frantz, Hushey, 
Wis. Joseph Mcl'ermaid, Hibbing: Mr. 
and Mrs. James McDermald Proctor; 
M-" Gerow. Liliev and Colle Gerow, 
Hibbing: Mr. and Mrs. Philip Devlne of 
Superior, Wis. .i«-„i 

There were a great many beautiful 
floral offerings. 

AUROROAirKTlLED. 

Run Over By Switch Engine While 
Watching Passing Train. 

Aurora, Minn., May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.i* — Anton Serjack was run 
over and killed by a switch engine at 
1ft o clock this morning in front of the 
Iron Range depot. He was watching a 
passing ore train and did not see the 
switch engine backing down the track. 

GILBERT CLASS"PLAY. 

Tennyson's "The Princess" to Be 
Given Saturday Night. 

Gilbert. Minn.. May 22.— ^Special to 
The Herald.) — The senior class of the 
Gilbert high school will give their 
r lass class play, "The Princess," by 
Alfred Tennyson, next Saturday night 
at the high si hool auditorium. 

The rehearsals have been under the 



CHANDLER MINE 

EMPLOYE DIES 



Drops Dead in Ely Boarding 

House— Another Ely 

Man Also Dies. 

Ely, M>nn., May 22. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — Two deaths occurred here 
during the night and early this morn- 
ing. John Arko, 40 years of age, un- 
married, dropped dead In John Supan- 
tlchs boarding house this morning. 
An autopsy disclosed an enlargement 
of the heart was the cause of death. 
Arko was employed at the Chandler 
mine and leaves relatives in Austria. 

John Wold, 60 years of age. died at 
tne .Shlpman hospital this morning. He 
had been employed by the logging de- 
partment of the Oliver Iron Mining 
ccmpiiny, but came to Ely ^Junoay and 
was taken to the hospital He leaves 
a brother in Dunn county, Wis. No 
funeral arrangements have yet been 
made. 




You Can Make Pure lager 

BEER 

Jn Your Own 
Home— with 

JohannHofmeister 
Genviine Lager 
Beer Elxtract 

Yoa can now brew your oyf.n bser— best you 
ever tastetl— easily, cheaply, right m your own 
liome. With Johann Hofmeister Beer Extract 
anyone can make the same high quality lager 
beer that has been made in Germany for ages— 
In the same honest, old-fashioned way. Beer 
tliat's so tasty, wholesome, sati.sfying. every 
member of the family will surely he delighted 
with it. Better beer than you can buy in saloons 
or In bottles anywhere. And it will cost less thtM 
3 cents a quart— a little over a half cent a glass I 

Real Malt and Hop Beer at 
11 Cents a Gallon ?rn^'.^fceeri 

rot imitation beer — but real German style lager 
beer, made of select Barley Malt and the best Hops, i 
Beer of fine, natural color — topped with a rich, | 
creamy foam. Beer with snap and sparkle — clear 
and pure as can be— with life and health in every ' 
drop. Andthe taste— oh, delicious! 

Johann Hofmeister Lager Beer Extract is 
guaranteed under the U. S. Food and Drugs 
Act. Serial No. 30.317. No license needed any- 
where to make your own beer with this pure ex- 
tract. Get a can of it today, follow the simple 
Instructions— then you'll know why breucry beer 
can never be sold where this beer has been introduced.. 
50c can make* 3 canon* of boer. 
7Sc can make* 7 sallon* ot beer. 
Sold by aii Druggists, or sent direct, prepaid, ' 
upon receipt of price (either size), by Johann 
Hofmei»t9r, 10 HofrnMitfr Bld^„ChieaMO, iiU • 



SPELLIN G CO NTESTS. 

Grade Pupils of Gilbert Being Tested 
in Orthography. 

Gilbert, Minn., May 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — A spelling contest was 
held this week between the various 
grades of the Gilbert schools. The 
winner between the third and fourth 
grades was LiOul.se Webb, between the 
fifth and sixth grades was Irvln La- 
londe, and between the seventh and 
eighth gradea_Lane Newberry. 

I^ater contests will be arranged, in 
wliich the winners of this contest will 
meet the winners from the McKinley, 
f-liia and Genoa schools of the same 
grades to decide the championship of 
the district. 



FORGOT TO SETTLE, 

Monroe Boardinghouse-Keeper Said 
to Have Left Unpaid Bills. 

Chlsholm, Minn., May 22.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Mlnty Tramontin and 
C. A. Munro made a hurried trip to 
Milwaukee this week after Joe Spech, 
wanted for "Jumping" some bills which 
he contracted while running a board- 
ing house at the Monroe. Spech is a 
miner in the Monroe underground and 
In connection has operated a boarding 
house for his countrymen, and is said 
to have run up some large bills. Spech 
together with several others of his 
countrymen were brought Into court 
last fall on a charge of gambling, the 
peculiar form of which was betting on 
an out of doors bowling contest. The 
bets were so high and the sport con- 
tinued so long that one of the men 
lost }125 and others smaller amounts 
ranging down to $25. The heavy loser 
however, felt his loss so keenly that 
he reported it to the police who ar- 
rested the entire bunch while still In 
the act. Spech Avas among the num- 
ber and paid a small fine with the 
others. 

UNFORTUNATEHiBBING 
WOMAN^GIVEN AID. 

Hibbing, Minn.. May 22.— (Special to 
The H»-rald.) — Accompanied by Miss 
Nellie Nelson, a nurse. Miss Ethel Lofe, 
a domestic, who has been quite 111 with 
rheumatism for some time, went to 
Shakopee today, where she will take 
the mud baths. 

Miss Lofe has be^n cared for by Mr. 
and Mrs. Dahlbt-rg for some time. From 
various charitable people Mrs. Dahl- 
berg secured subscriptions amounting 
to $G9 a few days ago, Tlie S. H. & 



The weather man 

Is trying hard to 
make gotxl cm his 
fair prediction, but 
hadn't succeeded in 
(haslng the clouds 
away this morning. 
There were ln<iica- 
tloiis that the suu 
might sliine before 
the day was out 
and the weather 
man blithely sings 
again today of fair 
and warmer weather for tonight and 

A* northeaster was doing business In 
Duluth a year ago today. . a.oa 

The sun rose this morning at ^....■J 
and it will set at 7:44 this evening, 
giving fifteen houiB and twenty min- 
utes of sunlight. .^ , ,1 „.!„„ 

Mr. Richardson nakes the following 
comment on weatler conditions: 

"During the last twenty-four h;'U[s 
rain fell over the lake region Oh o 
and Mississippi valleys. North Atlantic 
and AVest Gulf states. Heavy rains 
occurred in Western Tennessee, South- 
ern Louisiana and Eastern Texas. 
Cooler weather prevails over Ken- 
tucky, Illinois, M ssourl. Iowa and 
Southern W^Isconsln; while throughout 
the Northwest the temperature has 
risen somewhat. Condltion.s favor ran- 
weather at the Head of the Lakes dur- 
ing the ensuing thirty-six hours. 

— . — # 

General Foreoan*. 

Chicago, May 22.— Forecasts 
twenty-four hours enlng at 7 P- 
Friday: ,, . , 

Tpper Michigan— Generally fair 
night and Friday; frost tonight 



dav: warmer toniglit. . 

South Dakota— Fair tonight and Fri- 
day; rising temperature. 

Montana— Fair tonight and 1' ridaj , 
moderate temperature. 

Upper Lakes— -Moderate winds, most- 
ly northwest: generitlly fair weather 
tonight and Friday. 

The TemperatureM. 

Following were the highest temper- 
atures for twenty-four hours and the 
lowest for twelve, ending at < a, m. 
today: 

nigh. Low. 

Abilene 88 «2 

Mimnn 48 42 



and 
and 



Friday: 
in west 



for 
m. 

to- 

If 

weather 'cleaVs'; slightly warmer Frl- 

Wisconsin -Cloudy and continued 
oool tonight; Fiiday fair with slowly 
rising temperature. 

Minnesota — Fair tonight 
rising temperature Friday 

portion tonight. . t-. • i ,. . ,.ic 

*^ Iowa— Fair tonUrht and Friday; ris- 
ing temperature F'-}da>. , ,-. , 
North Dakota— Fair tonight and Frl- 



F F of A. Scanainavian lodge con- 
tributed $25 more and Supt. Hanson of 
the Winston-Deav company .^^ve an 
additional |2o The Scandinavian lodge 
wlil help Miss Lofe with additional 
funds if necessary. The young wom- 
an has no rfelativee In this country. 



Allantlc City ...61 

H.ililmore 72 

UattUfonl 66 

ni.sman-k ^2 

noise 76 

no^ton 62 

Huffalo 74 

fale»rj' 72 

Charlenton 80 

Chleaso 76 

Corpus Clirl»il..."8 

Denver 6fl 

De« MolriMi 50 

Peills Iwtke .14 

Do<lge 68 

l>uliiinue 6n 

DULUTH 42 

Piiniiig' 72 

Eantport 5C 



Etimoiiton 
K'ifariaha, .... 
Calvesfon . ... 
C.raiirt Forks . 
CJraiid Haven . 
fJrwn Bay . . . 

Hatteras 

Havre 

tirlpna 

Houtrhtcn . . . . 

Hurt'ti 

.larkscnviile . 
Kamloops . . . . 
Kaiifaa City . 
Knc'-XvlUe 
r.n t'rriKS© . . . 
I.ouls\ ille . . . 

M.TiUson 

Mnrquflte . . . 
Mfdiclne Hat 
Memphis .... 
Miaul 



.68 

..46 

.82 

.92 

...68 

. . .'.4 

...80 

...89 

...68 

'.'.'.r>2 

...80 
...72 
...64 
...84 

'.'.'.k2 
...64 
...44 
...74 
...70 



.'.6 
02 
40 

50 
50 
50 
46 
72 
52 
70 
42 
48 
44 
44 
48 
38 
40 
42 
48 
44 
68 
30 
44 
46 
72 
44 
44 
.S8 
40 
68 
48 
.■\0 

ne 

40 

r.H 
40 
3(3 
48 
58 
7t 



HiKh. 

Miles City H4 

.Milwaukee 70 

Mliineilosa 58 

Modetia 78 

MniittroraefT 86 

Montreal 58 

Moorhead 48 

New Orleans ...84 

New York H2 

Nortli Piatt* ...64 

Oklahoma 56 

(iniaiia 60 

I'lioeiilx ;>0 

Pierre ,'54 

PlttRliurg 80 

Port Arthur 46 

P.-rtlaml. Or ....76 

Prime Ail>ert 62 

QuAppell* r.2 

IlalelKli 8fl 

RapM City .. 



TioHeburg 
Hoswell . . 
St. I.ouls 
St. Paul . 
Salt Lake 
Sail I>lego 



74 

S6 

76 

.12 

City.. .68 
...M 



San KranrlHCO . . 56 
Saiilt Ste. Marie. 52 

Seattle 70 

Sheridan 64 

S)u*Teport 84 

Hloux City S4 

Spokane 72 

SHlft Current 68 

Tampa SO 

T>.ledo 78 

Valentine 

Washlntrton 78 

wmifcton '-4 

Wtimemucra *6 

Winnipeg 62 

Yellcv-'ione ^8 



I.,ow. 
42 
50 
44 

46 
C8 

.^6 
68 
54 
42 
46 
46 
64 
42 
CJ 
42 
48 
?.8 
36 
68 
36 
44 
58 

r.4 

44 

48 
58 
50 
44 

50 
34 

66 
46 
46 
46 
68 
60 
40 
66 
36 
46 
46 
34 



death of her father. She is the oldest 
daughter of Mrs. James Bell of Wal- 
nut stre»-t. 

Mr. Miller is also well and favorably 
known here having lived lur«^ for sev- 
eral years. 



SPECIAL TRAIN 

PARTY WRECKED 



E 





SOCIALISTS TO MARCH 
IN MEMORIAL PARADE. 

Grand Rapids. Minn., May 22. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Some of the lo- 
cal societies have signified their In- 
tention of taking part In the parade 
planned for Memorial day, and have 
notified the chairman of the general 
committee. Rev. A. A. Meyers, to that 
effect. It is planned to meet and form 
on one of the side streets, march the 
length of the main street and then 
to the high school, where a platform 
will be erected across the creek, so 
that the audience may occupy both 
banks of the stream, allowing for a 
muih better chance to see and hear. 
Each school will furnish two num- 
bers for the urogram, as well as a 
marching squad for the parade. 

HIBBlNGBOTmO 

PLANS BUSY YEAR. 



Hibbing, Minn., May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The water, light, power 
and building commission of the village 
held a meeting at the city hall Tues- 
day evening at which John Curran, 
newly appointed member of the com- 
mission to succeed William Wearne, 
resigned, took his seat. Routine busi- 
ness occupied tlie attention of the com- 
mission. 

The comm'sslon will have one of 
the busiest seasons In Its existence this 
year. Several matters of the first im- 
portance to the village are under con- 
sideration though none of them have 
yet been worked out to details of avail- 
ability for news. 



ITCH M BURN 



Came Out in Watery Pimples. 
Would Haveto Walk Floor. Could 
Not Put Hands in Water. Cuti- 
cura Soap and Ointment Cured. 

m 

Box 7, Gowan, Minn. — " My eczema came 
out In wat«ry irfmples, a kind of a rash, and 
looked like watery milk when 1 would 
scratch it. And then Ohl 
bow It would itch and 
btunl My bAnda were so 
bad that I could not do 
anything about the house. 
I could not wash my face 
or comb my haJr at times. 
It wa£ on tbe inside on my 
hands and feet. My 
trouble began with having 
my hands In water too much. My bands 
would itch and bum bo I woidd have to walk 
the floor and when I would do that my feet 
would bleed. As for putting my hacda In 
water, I could not, for if I did my hands 
would bleed and my fee* tho same. I wa* 
not able to wear my shoes for three months. 
"I tried different kinds of remedlea but 
they did no good. By uaiog Cutteura Soap 
and Ointment I was cwced in four months 
and have seen nothing of the trouble in three 
yean." (Signed) Miss Ada Erickson, May 
0, 1012. 

Why not have a clear skin, soft white 
hands, a clean scalp and good hair? It Is 
your birthright. Cutlcura Soap with ap oc- 
casional use of Cutlcura Ointment will bring 
about these coveted conditions In most cases 
when eU else fails. Outicura Soap (26c.) 
aad C?uticura Ointment (80c.) are sold every- 
wbera Liberal sample of each malted ft-ee, 
with 32-p. Skin Book- Addrebs post-card 
"Cutlcura, Dept. T, Boston." 

jgrTender-faced men should tt»o Outicura 
Soap Shaving Stick, 2Ac. Samplo ttot. 



BIWABIKCONCERT. 

Band Will Entertain Friday Evening 
at Benefit Performance. 

Biwabik, Minn., May 22.— (Special to 
Tlie Herald.)— Th«. city band members 
are practicing n«-arly every evening 
for the concert to be given next Friday 
evening. The cor cert proceeds are to 
lo towards buying new ns/''^I",«'"t^ 
which are badly nteTled. It is hoped the 
concert will b*. well «"ended and eii- 
courage as well as assist t^^e band 
boys In their hopes of gaining the de- 
sired instruments. The ^o^^ert will be 
lield in the h'Pli school auditorium 
and the admission Is to be ^^„f,*'"ts 
for adults and lo cents for /;hlldren 
Th*^ band gave free concerts all during 
the past winter months that were well 

;iT",-'on':?i".- ..waiter Bl.rsCenk 

Band. 
W'altz— "II Trov«rore" \eidl 

Band. .,,, 

Overture— "Spirit of Liberty". .. .Miller 

Band. 

Vocal solo — Selerted 

\ocai .oi ^^^^^ McGrath. 

Piano duet — Selected. . . . . 

Miss Wheeler, Miss Norman. 
Medley «5election — "War Songs of the 

BOV8 in Blue- Lorendo 

Band. 
Reading— "Scene From the Seven 

Oaks" ■ • • V 

MisiJ Raabe. ^ ,. 

Saxophone solo— 'The Shepherds 

Ttrcam" i ' .> "r 

Ch'irles Lester; aecompanlPt, Mrs. Lowe. 
Ladies' sextette— Song, eelected. . ... 
Misses MoGrath. L)egnan W letzel, Nor- 
man. Raabe, \\ heeler. 

Piano solo— Sele< ted 

Mri!. Lowe. 
Overture— Selected, 'Apawamus -^-^^^ 

Band. 

"Star Spangled Banner" 




IS SOON EXPECTED. 

Virginia Postoflice Appointment Is 
Reported About Due. 

Virginia, Minn., May 212.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— It is expected that the 
announcement soon will be made from 
Washington In regard to the local 
nostma^ershlp and that either Mrs. 
MarVH James will be reappointed, or 
another will hav.? the position. James 
H Fleming is ssld to have strong In- 
dorsement from influential men in both 
?he county and .tate. Mr.s. James has 
Lone through the strenuous period of 
moTing from the ramshackle old place 
m cupied for many years by the post- 
nffiee to tho government-owned new 
building and the postofflce business Is 
now carried on In quarters that are 
just as modern and complete as the 
government fuTr ishes. 

another"competition, 

Virginia Commercial Club to Again 
Encourage Homecroftlng. 

Virginia. Minn , May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Again this year Virginia 
will have a homecroft committee, a 
earden competition and at the end of 
the growing seafion, an exhibit of home 
Krown products, the same as In 19U, 
except that the quantity to be grown 
and the exhibit? will be on a much 
larirer scale. The committee will be 
.appointed at tho next meeting of the 
Commercial cluh. R. C Pickering, an 
enlhuslaBtlc homecrofter, was the 



chairman of the homecroft ^^^is ^l^f- 
last year and on account o^.^i^.^^^ 
flclent work w^lU be I'taPP^' nted this 
yean Last fall it was found that he 
storeroom which was obtained for the 
exhibit was altogether too small and 
ft large hall will be obtained for the 
exhibit at the end of the season this 
vear Awards will be made for the 
^:s% kept\ardens. bacUj^rds anc^ la^^^^^ 
bv a committee whleh will 'D»P^f\ '^'' 
the places which will be recorded as 
being in the competition. ^ 

HAY SEEkTpOSITION. 

Thief River Falls Educator After Vir- 
ginia School Job. 

Virginia, Minn.. May 22.— .Special to 
The Herald.)— Applications have been 
received by the secretary of the school 
board for the position of «"Pf ^inteml- 
ent of schools, to succeed Lafawtte 
n i«s One of the applicants Is Prof. 
Th: Ha^of Thief River Falls who Is 
spending a few days in the city and 
whUe hire he has made a persona as 
well as his filed written application 
for the position, 

chishoTmcouple 

WILL^ MARRIED. 

Chlsholm, Minn., May 22,— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Announcement IS 
made of the marriage in June of Miss 
Mildr.d Bell of this place to James 
Miller Mr. Miller ha.s already pur- 
chased a home here and is nc>w pre- 
paring to furnish it for Immediate oc- 
cupancy. , , -^_ 

The bride Is well known having for 
several vears been employed on the 
Tribune-Herald as local reporter She 
was educated In the Chlsholm schools, 
leaving school a few years ago to tako 
up newspaper reporting after the 

LiQtJOR HABIT 
PERMANENTLY 

CURED 



No need of going to a sanitarium 
when you can be cured at home with- 
in two weeks' time. Cure guaranteed 
or $500.00 reward In case of failure. 
Charges wltliln reach of everyone. Hun- 
dreds of testimonials from people 
vou know. Treatment very pleasant 
to take with immediate improvement 
therefrom. Read what these men say: 
DULUTH, Minn.. May 12, 1907. 

Three years ago I was In Chlsholm, 
Minn , condemned to die by niy doctor. 
Mv troubles were too much liquor for 
too long a time. I am now more than 
pleased to have a chance to testify that 
Mr J B Flssette's Cure has fully re- 
established my health and drives all op. 

T^..tit« for llQUor from me. 

petite lor jw fraNK MASON, 

1122 Michigan St., Duluth, Minn. 

CHISHOLM, Minn., May 18, 1911. 

I certify that after drinking Intoxi- 
cating liquor for twenty years and I 
could not control myself. I tried to 
Btoo several times, but It was impossi- 
ble until I took f'rof, J. B. Flssette's 
treatment for two weeks and I am com- 
pletely cured and have no desire for 
liquor of any kind, ^^ . ^ ,, , 

I recommend It for the best medicine 

out. Yours truly. ^^^ tT'ERCOTT. 
Come in for free consultation. Con- 

'^^'"'rUOF. JOHN B. FISSETTE, 
Antl-I.lqnnr <'iire, 
Fuicere Bloek, 100 l-ake Street, 
Chlabulin, Mlnu. 



Two Harbors, Minn,. May 22.— fSpe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The private cars 
Minnesota and Vermilion, making up a 
special train run for Auditor H. John- 
son of the Iron Range road, the clerks 
in his office and agents, were ni a 
wreck vestcrday morning near Mud 
lake, about ninety-one and a lualf miles 
from Duluth, No one was hurt except- 
ing Engineer HUlman, who was scald- 
ed on one leg. 

The wreck was due to a track-laying 
gang which was laying steel on the 
curve where the accident happened, 
and for some reason, which as yet has 
not been determined, the engineer 
failed to get the danger signal from 
the flagman, which Avas sent out by 
the extra gang to give the warning. 
The members of the private party re- 
turned to Duluth last niglit on train 
No, 4. 

Locomotive Turn* Over. 

The locomotive of the special was 
turned over In the ditch clear of the 
main line and the combination car. 
which was next to the engine was de- 
railed, but remained upright. The two 
private cars were not damaged In any 
wav having remained on the track. 

Engineer Nelson S. Hlllman narrow- 
ly escaped serious injuries, but man- 
aged to escape the affair with only a 
slight scalding on one of the legs. All 
the other members of the crew and 
the occupants of the private cars es- 
caped wltliout even a scratch, al- 
though thev received a severe shaking 
up. A phvsician was brought to the 
scene from Tower bv a switch engine 
and Engln«'er Hillman's Injuries were 
soon cared for and he was made com- 
fortable in one of the private cars. He 
was brought to this city last night 
and it is thought that his injuries will 
not keep liim out of the service very 
long. The other members of the crew 
were Conductor E. W. Olaea, Sr.. 
Brakemen Clifford Symons and GregOr 
Miller, and Fireman Mark Ennis. 

NOTHISBROTHER, 

Chlsholm Man Gets Fright Over St. 
Paul Tragedy. 

Chlsholm, Minn., May 22.— (Special 
to The Herald,) — William Conley of 
this village was relieved yesterday 
when he got a telegram from Penn- 
sylvania stating tliat liis brother was 
home there and safe and not killed as 
he had heard. Mr, Conley read of a 
man of that name being killed by a 
train In St. Paul early In the week 
and the description of the dead man 
tallied so closelv to that of his broth- 
er that he telephoned St. Paul and 
wired east to make certain. 

Several years ago Mr, Conley had a 
similar experience while living in Su- 
perior. „ , , 

A man's bodv was found floating In 
the harbor and papers on his person 
showed his name to be William Con- 
ley No attention was paid to it other 
than was usual and it was .sume two 
weeks later before Mr. Conley ).;arned 
through relatives tliat the William 
Con lev found was a first cousin. The 
experience taught him that should 
such a circumstance occur again he 
would use every effort to determine 
whether it was a relative or not, heme 
th" anxiety in the case at St. Pa\il. 

MOTHERS^ CLUBMEET. 

Business to Be Transacted By Ely Or- 
ganization Friday Evening. 

Ely. Minn., May 22— (Special to The 
Herald.) — A meeting of the Ely Moth- 
ers' club will be held Friday evening at 
the high school auditorium. The an- 
nual election of officers will be held, 
also a general business meeting, after 
wiiicii a program consisting of musical 
numbers and lantern slides lllus- 
tifTting sacred history, will be given. 
Among the pictures to be shown will 
be the most famous of the Madonnas. 
The meeting will begin at 8. After 
the program refreshments will be 
served by the committee of the club. 

The mothers' club had a very busy 
year, having in addition to their regu- 
lar work given during the seascm a 
most successful home talent play, and 
besides their regular benevolent work 
here, '-alls from outside have been re- 
ceived and a sum of money appropriat- 
ed by the dub toward the relief fund 
for flood suffer^^rs in Ohio. Both Gov- 
ernor Cox and the chairman of the re- 
lief association of Ohio responded by 
letter to the contribution made by the 
club. 



I two games with Virginia at Mrginla 
i next Saturday and Sunday. 

F M. Seelev was here from Two 
I Harbors and visited with his parents 
the first of the week. 

The planting of the trees in the 
j«arklngs ;ibout Biwabik has been hin- 
df red by the lecent rains. 

NEW NASRWaUK CLUB. 

Nashwauk, Minn., May 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The Nashwauk Youn» 
Men's club has been .started here with 
about fifty members and the following 
officerH and ccmimiltees: 

Fred FUnk, president; H. W. Hen- 
esev, vice president; Stanley Clark, 
secretary, and Wilbur Ohlee, treasurer. 

Committee on rules — C. J. Carlson, 
chairman; H. T. La Fltte and E. S. Bar- 
nand. 

House committee — H. W. Henesey, O. 
H. Chalmers and Stanley Clark. 

Athletics — Nels Nelson, Albert Ha- 
gen and Joneph cloon. 

Entertainment — H. V. Martin, G. H. 
Chalmers and Wilbur Ohles, 

Membership— H, T. La Fltt*-, A. C. 
Stahl, C, J. Carlson and P, H. Tweed. 

Finance — Alex Jaffe, D, Gleason and 
M. J. l>onovan. 

Publh ity—Wilbur Ohlee. M. J. Dono. 
van and Stanley Clark. 

The members expect to get enough 
funds within the next week to fit < ut 
clubrooms over the Nashwauk Hard- 
ware company's More on Central ave- 
nue, or the .Shellman building. 

PASSE S^OVER VETO. 

Evehth, Minn., May 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — De^pitfc the veto of 
Mayor Saarl the members of the coun- 
cil are determined to purchase from 
the W'eyerhaeuser interests for |1,&G0 
the timber on the proposed Ely lake 
park as the aldermen passed a resolu- 
tion to that effect Ti;t.'^^ilny night over 
the mayor's objection. Murphy, Dorr 
it Flynn gave the park to tlie city, but 
the timber on it belonged to the 
Weyeihaeuser people and It wag ad- 
mitted to cut the timber would ruin 
t!io park, to the aldermen conceived 
the Idea of lurchasjng it. 

The park board has already made a 
decided improvement in the pia< e, and, 
according to plans laid out, much work 
will be carried on there the present 
summer and the Lake park made into 
an ideal pleasure spot, 

A resolution was passed by the coun- 
cil granting permission to the Mesaba 
Electric Railway company to construct 
a ••y" on Pierce street near the Glode 
hotel, 

HEALY THEATER 

WALL TUMBLES. 

Hibbing, Minn., May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Part of the east wall of 
the Healv theater which was burned 
last year fell with a crash yesterday 
afternoon without injuring any one. 

As a precautionary measure, ropes 
have been placed across Cedar street in 
front of tlje theater. 

Several plans have been formed for 
the repair of the building and putting 
It to use as a garage, a warehouse or 
some similar purpose but thus far all 
of them have come to nothing. With 
the fall of the wall considerable re- 
pairs would probably be necefsary in 
order to make any use whatever of the 
structure. 



Grand KaptdM WeddisK. 

Grand Rapids Minn.. May 22,— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald,)— Mrs. Elizabeth 
Holmes of this village and Alexander 
Magladry of lietrolt were quietly mar- 
ried Tuesdav evening at the iiome of 
the bride bv Rev. A. A. Meyers, pas- 
tor of the Methodist church. Only 
a few close friends of the couple were 
present. After the service a wedding 
supper was served. Mr. and Mrs. 
Magladrv will spend the summer in 
Grand Rapids, and in the fall will re- 
move to the home of the groom In De- 
troit. 

« 

ntrlH Entertain Boja. 

Grand Rapids, Minn., May 22— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald..— The girls of the 
junior clasps of the high school enter- 
tained the boys of the class at a four- 
course dinner last evening in the high 
school domestic science rooms as a 
reward of merit because the junior 
baseball team has recently won the 
high school championship. 

Mort Tavlor and A. C, Kent, both 
of Grand Rapids, have formed a part- 
nership, Kent & Taylor, and are located 
in the Mevers building on Kindred 
avenue to deal in plumbing supplies. 

• 

Nasbwank to Celebrate. 
Nashwauk, Minn., May 22.— (.Special 
to The Herald.— President Shellman of 
the Commercial club has appointed the 
following committee of five to raise 
11,000 for the proposed Fourth of July 
celebration: John P. Lanto. chairman; 
Pasquale Verre, T. R. Dodson. Abe 
Markus, William Hayes. The commit- 
tee on arrangements consists of P. H. 
Tvedt, chairman; Oscar Johnston, 
George Lindsay, M, E. Gaftney and 
Mayor John P. Raattama. 

Winton Eptdrmlc Over. 

Winton. Minn., May 22.— The small- 
pox epidemic which broke out here a 
short time ago is now about at an end. 
and at present there are but two pa- 
tients in the local pesthouse and they 
will be let out this week. 



After the 
Theatre 




BEER 

compl etes 
^dn" ■ 

ewning's 
leasure 




TlieaHdmm 

Brewing 

Company 



BIWABIK PLAYHOUSE 
IS BEING REMODELED. 

Biwabik, Minn.. May 22. — (.Special to 
The Herald.) — Contractors started yes- 
terday to remodel the Bijou theater. 
The building will have a fine base- 
ment and it is planned the work will 
be completed about July 1. The build- 
ing will be one story high and the 
full length of the l<n. When com- 
pleted It will be an up-to-date play- 
house In every respect. 

The ladles of the Congregational 
church gave a supper last evening at 
the home of Dr. and Mrs, C. W, Bray 
There was a very good attendance In 
spite of the rain, and a neat sum was 

realized. -,-, i lu 

O E Everett returned from Duluth 

yesterday after spending several days 

there on business. 
The Biwabik baseball team will play 




7 



* % 



JAY W. ANDERSON 

Agent Duluth Brancli 

Phones: 

Zenith. Crand 1800 Duluth. MclrMc IMO 



RSHB 



•^ 



■.»» ' I t tt\> <ti - '1^ I. - 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH H3SRALD 



May 22, 1913. 



15 



REPORT AGAINST TWO 



PROPOSED CHANNELS 



Engineers Do Not Favor 

Deepening of St. Louis 

River. 



Lake Superior - Mississippi 

Canal Is Also Turned 

Down. 



A report adverse to the proposed 
exti-nsion of the 8t. Louis river chan- 
nel to C;>maioii\veaIth avenue. New 

r»uluth, has bton made to the vvar d-?- 
parlin^Tit by th> special board of engi- 
neers appointed to n\ake an examina- 
tion. T^e board consisted of Col. C. 
Ia l^'Uter. Col. F. R. Shunk and Capt. 
K. 1». Peek. 

The unfavorable report Is based on 
the co.ielusion "That the benefits to 
^ be obtain* d are not coinmensurat'a 
%vlth the cost." 

Capt. Peek has issued a notice to 



CITY BRIEFS 



M. I. Sttftvart Cumpaux, 

Successors to Tiiwing-.'^t.wart Co. 
Frintera, Designers, Lithosraphers. 



Duluth -Man Drowned. 

Who was C. E. Nelson of Duluth, 
dr >wned in the river at Woodland. Cal., 
two )veeks ago? The police would like 
to know. A telegram was received 
yesterday tahat tlie body was recov- 
ered and the authorities at the Cali- 
fornia town are awaiting instructions. 



SiiiKem to Copper Conntry. 

A choir composed of members of the 
Duluth Finnish-American Klite choir, 
tvhich will tour Europe next June and 
July, will leave Saturday for the Cop- 
per coxintry where concerts will be 
Klven Sunday at Hancock and Calumet. 
The choir Is und«r the direction of 
Prof. S. Mu.-*tonen. The farewell con- 
cert wiil be given next Wednesday eve- 
ning at the Central high school. 

-— ♦ 

Doctor* Mrrt. 

The Interurban Academy of Medi- 
cine held a meeting at the Spalding last 
evening. Dr. J. A. Winter of Duluth 
and Dr. T. J. O'Leary of Superior read 
papers on "The Tonsils." 

# ^ 

Rai-iinic Church Fnnd. 

The fund started for the erection or 
purc!!ase of an edifice for the Ifnion 
church congregation is growing rapid- 
ly. The organizations of the church 
are working liard to Increase the fund. 
Th.' congregation now meets at the K. 
of P. hall. 



interested persons that they have the 
tight of i ppeal to the board cf engl 
n-^ers for rivers and harbors, a perma- 
nent body sitting at Washington. 

The same board has reported ad- 
versely to th'^ proposed Luke Superior 
& Mississippi canal. The reason 
stated for the adverse report ia "that 
the present railroad rate on freight 
between the Twin Cities and the Head 
of the Lakes Is loss than will be tlie 
tost of canal transportation when the 
cost of extra handlinif and operation, 
maintenance and Interest on Invest- 
n ent have been addi d to the ^,K»*»e 
canal rate for an equal distance." 

The board of engineers held a hear- 
i.g at Duluth during the winter and 
testimony w'as offered en both sub- 
lects. Duluth people supported the 
"nhm for the extension of tlie St. Louis 
river cliannel and opposed the pro- 
nosed Lake Superior .<c Mississippi canal 
on the ground that it would be com- 
merclallv valueless, but would act as 
potential water competition to enable 
the railroads to extend preferential 
rates to the Twin Cities. 

Superior people also appeared m 
favor of the propos-'d extension of the 
St L«>uis river channel, and the J*ro- 
posed canal was championed by StUl- 
wattr and St. Paul people. 



trict court by Carlos J. Kinzel against 
the Boston & Duluth Farm Land com- 
)>any to recover |5.000 alleged to be 
due him as commission for the sale or 
certain lands. The dismissal was or- 
dered on the grounds that the same 
issues had been previously settled m 
a court of competent jurisdiction. 

Notice to- Milk Dealers. 

Thomas Manley. a representative oC 
the Minnesota Dairy and Food Commljs- 
sion, will be at Koom 10. City Hall, 
three days next week. May 2o, :27 and 
2S, to issue state milk licenses to all 
dealers in milk. After the 28th the in- 
spector in charge will proceed to en- 
force the requirements of the law 

against any delin-iuent. 

JOEL G. WINKJER. 

Commissioner. 



Verdict For $254. 

A verdict for $254 in favor of the 
plaintiff was returned yesterday after- 
noon by the jury which has been 
hearing evidence in district court be- 
fore Judge Fesler in the lawsuit wliich 
Louis Leiiner brought against C. J. 
Krederickson. Leimer sued for $603.64, 
claiming this amount as tlie balance 
due him for the hire of a number of 
dump wagons and horses used by the 
d-^fendant in contract woi;k near Hope, 
N. D. 

• 

Meeting: Pontponed. 

There will be no regular prayer 
meeting service in the First Presbyter- 
Ian church this evening. This is owing 
to the fact that the heating plant is 
being repaired and will not be avail- 
able for heating the building. 



Northland Prlnterr. 

Good printing. Call Zenith 494. Adv. 



Theosophlcal Society. 

The Theosophical society will hold 
Its regular weekly meeting for mem- 
bers only at the lodge room In the Bur- 
g>*93 block this evening at 3 o'clock. 
The subject for study Is "The Tliird 
Qualification for Disclpleshlp." The 
meditation class preceding the lodge 
ineeting will commence promptly at 
7:20. 



923.29S From Tax Sale. 

The annual delinquent tax sale, 
■which was conducted by the county 
treasury, according to the figures 
Tt-hlch have been compiled by Deputy 
Auditor L. A. Marvin. About 2.700 
descriptions on which the 1011 real 
estate taxes were delinquent, were dis- 
posed of. 



DI<tiiilM$tp<t .Salt. 

Judge Fesler yesterday dismissed the 
lawsuit which has been brought in dis- 



Taken to Prison. 

Sheriff John R. Meinlng left this 
afternoon for Stillwater, where he will 
deliver Mike Mltrovich to the warden 
of the state penitentiary. Mitrovich 
Avas convicted on the range of second 
degree assault. He was sentenced by 
Judge Martin Hughes to Stillwater on 
the Indeterminate plan. 

^ — 

Finns to Visit Europe. 

Otto Arlund, representetive of the 
Tyomles, the Finnish daily of this city, 
and a party of about loO Finns of Du- 
luth and the range will leave Saturday 
for a four months' visit to their native 
country. Tlie party will sail 6n a ship 
of the White Star line, and according 
to the statement of Mr Arlund. all of 
them will return to Duluth at the end 
of their visit. 

Talked Back to Policeman. 

Alex Anderson and James Meyers 
were arrested at First avenue east and 
Superior street about 11:15 o'clock last 
night by Patrolman Danlelson on 
cliarges of being drunk and disorderly. 
The policeman reported that they used 
abusive language and put up a nght 
when he placed them under arrest 
after they refused to obey his Instruc. 
tions to move along. They pleaded 
guilty in police court this morning and 
got $20 and costs or twenty days each. 
David Preston, who was with the 
party, did not participate in the mix- 
up and was let down with the mini- 
mum. $3 or three days, when he ad- 
mitted that he had been drunk. 
> 
Sentence Is Suspended. 

B. B. Bardell. a settler living near 
Meadowlands, was arrested yesterday 
bv Deputy Game Warden Storev on a 
charge of having venison in hig pos- 
session. He pleaded guilty and got $30 
and costs or sixty days in the county 
Jail. He satisfied the court that he 
had not killed the animal, but had re- 
ceived the meat from another and sen- 
tence was suspended. 

♦ 

Default Jadirment. 

Default judjrinent was entered in dis- 
trict court yesterday in favor of Jose- 
phine Engle and agqinst Fred C. Har- 
ris and Mark Eddy for $1,601.73 with 
interest at 6 per cent since Jan. 31, 1911. 
The action was originally brought 
against tlie Lily Iron Mining company 
and judgment obtained. The defendants 
then furnished a bond to secure the 
payment of the Judgment, but accord- 
ing to plaintiff's claims. It was not sat- 
isfied. 



Amateur Shovr. 

Duluth court No. 724. I. O. F.. will 
entertain tomorrow evening at a vaude- 
ville show and dance for Its members 
and friends at the Foresters' hall. 
Fourth avenue west and First street. 
No admission will be charged. Among 
those who will take part In the show 
are Harrv Budd. James Dunn, J. H. 
Feschel, Jack O'Leary, E. Elstad, C. 



Smith & Allen Co. 



PROGRAMME 

May 22, 1913, 8:15 P. M. 



1. "March Grotesque," Op 32, No. 1 

Pianola Piano. 

2. Selection 

Edison Disc Phonograph. 

3. "Rondo Capricioso" Mendelssohn 

4. Selection 

Edison Disc Phonograph. 

5. (a) "Last Night" Kjerulf 

Victrola-Helen Clarke. 

(b) "Beautiful Isle of Somewhere" Fearis 

Victrola-Harold Jarvis. 
(Accompanied by Pianola Piano.) 

6. Selection 

Edison Disc Phonograph. 

7. (a) "In My Neighbor's Garden," Op. 21, No. 5.Nevin 
(b) "Water Nymph," Op. 13, No. 3 Nevin 

Pianola Piano. 

8. Selection 

Edison Disc Phonograph. 

9. "Rhapsodic Hongroise No. 12" Liszt 

Pianola Piano. 

10. Selection 

Edison Disc Phonograph. 

11. "Carmen." "Toreador Song" Bizet 

Victrola-Pasquale Amato. 

(Accompanied by Pianola Piano.) 

12. Selection .: 

Edison Disc Phonograph. 



DULUTHIANS RETURN FROM 
WIN TER SPEN T IN CUBA 

Luther Mendenhall Tells of Life in Havana --No Ex- 
treme Temperatures and No Flies. 




LUTHER MENDENHALL. 



That Havana is the Ideal place to 
pass the winter months Is the firmly 
established belief of Mr. and Mrs. Lu- 
ther ^lendenhall, who have returned to 
Duluth from their winter home in the 
Cuban capital. They have been spend- 
ing the cold months there for eight 
years now. and while residents of Ha- 
vana occupy their own dwelling. Dur- 
ing the past winter Mr. and Mrs. Men- 
denhall entertained many Northerners, 
several of whom were from Duluth, 
among them being Mrs. W. S. Wood- 
bridge and Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Willcuts. 
They also saw John Millen during his 
stay there but failed to see John A. 
Stephenson while he was in the city. 
Returning they came over the East 
Coast road, the railroad built over the 
ooean by Henry M, Flagler, who died 
a few days ago. 

•'We arrived at Havana on Dec. 18 
and left on May 3," said Mr. Menden- 
hall this morning, "and during that 
time passed as delightful a time as one 
could Imagine. All of that time the 
variations of the thermometer were 
very limited. It would go down to 
about 70 deg. at night, so that one 
could sleep comfortably under a blan- 
ket, and In the daytime never went 
above 80 deg. The climate Is not hu- 
mid, bui on the contrary very dry and 
pleasant. The rainy season is In sum- 
mer, so we escaped that — it was al- 
ways sunshine. I am told that In sum- 
mer the thermonieter at night is about 
70 deg. and seldom does it go higher 
than 90 in daytime, so you see it is 
most pleasant. 

"Almost all of the houses are built 
with courts, and in these courts a pro- 
fusion of plants, palms and the like 
are kept, so that they seem a veritable 
Eden. One curious thing I observed in 



Hutchins, Charles Young, E. Gould, W. 
Wright and Misa Blanch Williams. 

., ♦ 

ReHlKns Pastorate. 

Rev. H. B. Sutherland of the Lake- 
side Presbyterian church has resigned 
as pastor of the local church. The 
congregation will hold a special meet- 
ing In the church tomorrow evening 
to take action on the matter. Rev. 
Mr. Sutherland has accepted a call 
from a church in the southern part 
of the state. 



Lakeside Brotherhood. 

The Brotherhood of the Lakeside 
Presbyterian church will hold its an- 
nual business meeting and election of 
officers tomorrow evening at the 
church. County Attorney Warren E. 
Greene will be the principal speaker 
of the evening. 



Temple Services. 

"Crimes of the Tongue" will be the 
subject of the sermon by Rabbi Lefko- 
vlts at Tetnple Emanuel, Seventh ave- 
nue east and Second street, tomorrow 
evening. 

• 

Mothers' Meeting. 

The Mothers' and Teachers' club of 
Park Point will meet in the Whittier 
school tomorrow afternoon at .1 o'clock. 
A program will be given. The prin- 
cipal address will be given by Mrs. A. 
A. Kerr. 



MoCuen Improving. 

Dr. J. A. McCuen, former mayor, who 
is confined at the St. Luke's hospital 
as the result of blood poisoning, is 
reported improving. 

..^ 

Say Bloek Is Baukrupt. 

Creditors of Julius H. Block of Du- 
luth this morning filed a petition with 
Judge Page Morris of the United States 
court, asking that he be adjudged a 
bankrupt. The petition claims that 
Mr. Block owes over $1,000 on notes 
and back debts. 



Recruit Accepted. 

Edward Tidutman, 23 years old, this 
morning applied at the local navy re- 
cruiting station and after a pliysical 
examination was accepted. His home 
is at Elizabethville. Pa., and a birth 
certificate must first be secured by 
Troutman before he will be allowed to 
join the navy. Troutman is the first 
i>ut of the last five applicants who was 
able to pass the physical test. 



PERSONAL 



C. E. Blair of V'iiglnia is registered 
at the Holland. 

J. A. Frey of St. Paul is a guest of 
the Holland. 

E. D. Walters of Minneapolis is In 
the city. 

H. B. Freldeman of Chicago is a guest 
of the Holland. 

George Slawson of Chicago Is a guest 
of the Holland. 

C. E. Henderson and wife of Easton, 
Md.. are at the Spalding. 

George LardefC and Herbert Swalno 
of Stevens Point are at the 'Spalding. 

L. R. Leslie of St. Paul is at the 
Spalding. 

' G. V. Holton of Minneapolis Is at the 
Spalding. .. , 

J. P. Love of Minneapolis is at the 
Spalding. 

Mrs. M. Palo of Elv la at the McKay. 

F. B. McLeran of Wrenshall Is at 
the McKay. ^ ^ 

Mrs. James Slaven of Sandstone Is 
registered at the McKay. 

Mrs. Albert Dean of Sandstone Is at 
the McKay. 

Mrs. Louise Anderson of Sandstone 
Is at the McKay. 

William Ford of Two Harbors Is at 
the McKay. 

Marjorie Howard of HIbbIng is at 
th- St. Louis. 

J. B. Gardner, formerly associated 



Havana Is that there are no bugs or 
Insects to destroy the plants. The 
only reason I can assign for this is 
that tliere are so maiiy chameleons — 
harmless little lizards that one car 
tame — who are deadly enemies to in- 
sects. There are pra< tieally no flies. 
An occasional one bu/.zing about a 
table Is a rather unusual sight. There 
are no mosquitoes except In the lower 
part of tile city near the water. So, 
tree from these afflictions of most 
cities, and with thtf balmy air, the 
continual sunshine, and sleepable 
nights, it Is a good jdace for recrea- 
tion. 

"The residence portion of the city Is 
ancient as to houses, which are built 
mostly of a mixture of limestone and 
rock, the more modern ones being of 
cement, ho\«ever. The walls are heavy, 
the ceilings exceptionally high — In my 
house, for Instance, they being thirty 
feet above the floor — and there are no 
glass panes in the windows except in 
the houses of a few Americans who 
have gone there rectntly, Tlie win- 
dows are open, but barred to keep out 
marauders, and one practically lives In 
the open air all of the time. The 
houses are tinted In almost all colors 
and in gazing at the rows of houses 
one is impressed with the picturesque 
riot of color as though looking at a 
painting. 

•My property there is on a fine 
corner, and the lot Isi about 168 feet 
square. The house occupies one-tliird 
of that space, the rest being taken up 
with a handsome garden. The house 
is about fifty years eld, having been 
built in slavery days when labor was 
cheap, and it Is so well constructed 
that there Is not yet a crack in it. 
Almost all of these liouses are one- 
story affairs and cover a lot of ground 
space. They are Just the thing for 
that kind of country and climate." 



with the law firm of Frybergor, Ful- 
ton & Spear, has Just returned from his 
old home iir old Virginia, where he ha.s 
been spending the winter. Mr. Gard- 
ner win shortly open a law office here. 

Williiim Pint- of Hibbing is a guest 
of the St Louis. 

Walter SiiUa of Vl'glnla IS at the 
St. Loui.s. 

William Harwood of St. Cloud Is in 
the city today. 

George J .Smith ct International 
Falls is at the Lenox. 



I OBITUARY I 



Capt. Georse S. Ai 

commander of the ba 
cued six Fenian prison 
Ish penal colony in A 
died at New Bedford, 
aged 70 years. The C; 
tenslbly for a whali: 
after cruising about fo 
made a dash for the j 
took the i)rlsoners on 
rled them to New York 



itbonr* who, as 
"k Catalpa, res- 
ers from a Brit- 
ustralia in 1876, 

Mass., May 22, 
italpa sailed os- 
ig voyage, and 
r several months 
Australian coast, 

board and car- 



Rrig. Gen. Joseph Cooke Jackson, a 

veteran of the Civil war, died at his 
home in New York May 22. The 
burial will be at Hartford, Conn. Gen. 
Jackson was born In I'Jewark, N. J., in 
1835. He' served with distinction from 
the time of his appointment as aide of 
the staff of Gen. Roliert Anderson in 
1861 till the close of tlie war. 



"ROE" SAYS HE 

IS NOT RIDGEWAY. 



Rochester. Minn., M 
Roe. the "man of inyst 
asylum here, by signs i 
phatically that he w; 
that he knows an.vthinj 
as Indicated in dispati 
more that I'Roe " m 
Ridgeway, a painter oi 

"Roe" todav noticed 
cerning Capt. Robert 
one time was witli Pea 
by signs that he kne 
and that the latter 
with him. 



ay 22. — Richard 
ery" at the state 
oday denied em- 
is a painter or 
J about painting, 

hes from Baiti- 
i^ht be James 
I' that city. 

an article con- 

Bartlett, who at 

ry, and indicated 

w Capt. Bartlett 

was acquainted 



DEMOCRATS WORK 

ON COMMITTEES. 



Washington, May 2 
cratic majority of the 
on ways and means m 
-sider assignments to t 

The effort of the I 
to blend consideration 
in congres, personal 
both the old and nev 
such a distribution o 
signments as to pres 
harmonious, effective 
organization. 



2. — The Demo- 
house committee 
et today to con- 
tie committees, 
louse leaders is 
for past service 
preferences of 
V niembers and 
I committee as- 
?rve a compact, 
working party 



TARIFF FIGHT 

MOVES ALONG. 

Washington, May 22. — The tariff fight 
In the senate moved another step to- 
day when Senator Penrose made ready 
to bring up his resolution for printing 
and circulating among manufacturers 
the list of tariff questions proposed by 
Senator La FoUette. A sub-f^ommittee 
composed of Senators Simmons, Stone 
and Williams was ready to propose a 
stibstitute list as an amendment. Sen- 
ator Simmons was ready to agree to the 
plan of sending out luestions If the 
substitute was agreed to. 

Sub-committees of the finance com- 
mittee continued hearing manufactur- 
ers. All hearings will be closed Tues- 
day. Senator Stone's mih-committee 
still Is working over the wool and 
metal schedule. 



BUSY DAY FOR 
COMMIHEES 

Public Health, Taxation, 
Education and Home- 
crofting Discussed. 



One Thousand Gladiolas 

Will Bloom on Second 

Street Lot. 



This was a busy day for sub-com- 
mittees of the public affairs commit- 
tee of the Commercial club. The com- 
mittee on public health, taxation, edu- 
cational co-operation and homecroft- 
Ing met at noon and a meeting of 
the committee on neighborhood clubs 
was set for 4 o'clock this after- 
noun. 

A stricter enforcement of the quar- 
antine regulations and more cheerful 
co-operation on the part of the pub- 
lic in obtaining the Isolation of con- 
tagious disease patients will probably 
be the first work undertaken by the 
public health committee. The commit- 
tee discus.sed quarantine today and de- 
termined to make an effort to have 
the laws respected more generally than 
ia now the case. It was the flrat meet- 
ing of the committee and the ground 
was covered In a general way. 

The committee will work In co-op- 
eration with tlie health department. 
Members of the committee say that the 
violation of quarantine regulations is 
due not entirely to laxity on the part 
of the health department but to a 
disposition on the part of the pub- 
lic to evade the discipline of the health 
laws If possible. If people generally 
would frown on the quarantine break- 
er, there would be less of it, they .say. 
Several other matters of public health 
were discussed, but there was no ac- 
tion taken. Dr. E. L. Tuohy is chair- 
man of the committee. 

Flower Cxhiblt. « 

One thousand gladiolas blooming to- 
gether in the lot at the corner of First 
avenue east and Second street will be 
a sight for flower lovers this sum- 
mer. The bulbs will be set by the 
homecroft committee of the club, as a 
foundation for the flower exhibit at 
the industrial and agricultural display 
to be held at the curling £lub next 
fall. 

The committee will also establish a 
model vegetable garden on the same 
lot, and others at the West end and at 
West Duluth if a suitable location can 
be found. The products will be canned 
at tiie end of the season and Duluth 
people will be shown what can be done 
by intelligent use of a restricted plot 
of ground. A man will be employed to 
look after the gardens and to give in- 
formation to amateurs. 

It Is too late for use this season, but 
during the summer the members of the 
cbmmittee will prepare and issue a 
booklet giving suggestions on se»ds 
and gardening methods. The booklet 
will be compiled with special refer- 
ence to soil and climatic condltioixs ir. 
I>uluth and it is expected to be a wel- 
come aid to amateur gardeners. 

The taxation committee held a short 
session and did little more than talk 
over the situation. Its principal du- 
ties will come when the tax levies are 
being set by city county and school 
district next fall. 

The committee on educational co- 
operation talked over the plans for the 
continuation school to be conducted by 



TOO LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement JLeas Than 15 Cents. 

Combings made Into beautiful switches; 
11.50 up. Marinello shop. Fidelity bldg. 



FOR RENT — MODERN NICELY FUR- 
nished five-room Hat; large porches 
and beautiful lake view. Melrose, 
3481. 



FOR SALE— GOOD DELIVERY HORSE, 
weight 9r)0 pounds, $45. Call 106 
North Fifty-sixth avenue west. Cal- 
umet. 18-M. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED DELIV- 
ery man; Grand 569, Melrose 1923. 



FOR SALE — $12.50 PER MONTH, 
with a small cash payment down, 
buys a nine-room house on large cor. 
ner lot on Woodland car line. This 
spells business and profit to you. 
Now Is the time, and this is the place. 
W. B. Roe, 412 Providence building. 



FOR RENT— FIVF:-R00MS: HEATED; 
for ligiit housekeeping and office or 
special shop, 13 East Superior street; 
rent reasonable. Corporate Invest- 
ment company, 100 Torrey building. 



Hair, Moles, Warts removed forever. 
Miss Kelly, 131 West Superior street. 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 

Nels Aucher and Clara Erickson. 



SOLID GOLD WEDDING AND EN- 
GAGEMENT RINGS made and mount- 
ed to order at Henricksen's. 



MONUMENTS. 

MONUMENTS— May 30 Is Decoration 
day. Call and see the Northwestern 
Monument Co.'s display of monu- 
ments; honest prices and first class 
service. 327 West First St., Duluth. 

MONI'^MENTS TO ORDER. DIRECT 
from tlie factory; no extra expenses; 
you save 20 iier cent. Clias. Benson, 
2301 W. Second St. Phone Lincoln 334. 

LARGEST STOCK OF HIGH GRADE 
monument.s in the Northwest; call 
and inspect before buying elsewhere. 
P. N. Peterson (Sranite Co., 230 E. Sup. 

BUILDING 1>ERMITS. 

To i'rank Wanlcky, frame 
dwelling, Ninet.v-eighth ave- 
nue west and Reid street. . . .$ 800 

To P. Johnson, brick store 

building, Central avenue.... 24.0'JO 

To W. Hocking, brick dwell- 
ing East Sixth street be- 
tween Second and Third ave- 
nues 3,000 

To B. Kryspln, addition. 
Twenty-fourth avenue west 
between Sixth and Seventh 
streets 300 

To Mrs. M. Watts, brick veneer 
dwrlllng. Woodland avenue 
between Clover and Jackson 
streets 2,506 

To C N. Bourdages, frame 
dwelling. West Fifth street 
between Thirty-seventh and 
Thirty-eighth avenues 1,600 

To O. H. Severson, frame 
dwelling, Glendale street 
between Fifty-second and 
Fifty-third avenues 1,500 

To R. Hood, addition. Lake 
avetiue south between Forty- 
first and Forty-second 
streets 300 

To P. Deloyla, garage, Cen- 
tral avenue between Roose- 
velt and Bristol streets 125 

To Mrs. E. Brown, repairs. 
West Superior street be- 
tween Fourteenth and Fif- 
teenth avenues 500 

To T. Thorburn. new front. 
East Lourtli street between 
Fifth and Sixth avenues.... 250 

To F. Giernot. atone founda- 
tion. West Tenth street be- 
tween Piedmont and Twen- 
ty-second avenues S'OO 



For Baby's Comfort and Mother's Convenience 

Here is the only conveyance designed for the baby that will absolutely 
permit the mother to take her child everywhere. Shopping, calling, visit- 
ing, riding on cars, trains, or elevators, it makes no difference where 
you go or how you go, the baby need never be lifted out. The 

!• a combined Wheeler, Carrier, Bassinet and Jumper. It 

can be pushed or pulled, carried on the arm or will stand 

alone — can't topple over. Can be changed from a wheeler 

to a carrier or chair in an instant. Simply pull a cord.— 

Go-Basket settles gently to the ground with the wheels out 

of sight and out of the way. No complicated mechanism 

to get out of order — works so simply and easily that any 

grown child can do it. Come and examine It yourself* 

These Prices Prevail as 
Long as Our^Stock Lasts 

Note the Numbers— Use This Ad When 
You Go to Compare Prices, 




Our No. 2 Oriole 
Our No. S Oriole 
Our No. 10 Oriole 
Our No. 15 Oriole 



• • • • • 



• a • • • 



• • • • • 



$3.60 
$4.80 
$6.00 
$8.40 



—REMEMBER THE PLACE 
COMPLETI ROOSEFURNISHERS 




A& 



Sicond Ave; W. lod First SI 




the board of education at the Wash- 
inton grade and manual training school 
during the coming year. It was the 
first meeting of the committee and its 
work was talked over only In a gen- 
eral way. 



NEW POLICE 



AUTO ARRIVES 



Is Combination Patrol and 

Ambulance — Replaces 

Old Black Maria. 

Duluth's new combination automo- 
bile patrol and emergency ambulance 
arrived this morning. 

It's a 50-horse power Peerless and 
will be stationed In the headquarters 

station ready for service, replacing tlie 
"Kato" which lias long outlived its use- 
fulness. 

The new automobile Is powerful, 
nearly noiseless and ranks with the 
best outfits of its kind. With it the 
police will be able to cover a much 
greater territory. In les stime, than 
wa.s possible with the rattle box which 
now practically goes into tlie discard. 
It will not be ditched, but will be 
fixed up as well as can be done and 
kept in reserve. It will still rirti but is 
slow and imreliable. 

The big Peerless Is so arranged that 
it can be transformed into an ambu- 
lance In a few seconds. It will be 
fittt'd with the necessary stretcher and 
equipment. "With It the police will be 
able to re.ipond to accident calls at a 
minute's notice and handle the cases 
properly. The new car tills a need 
which has long been felt In the city. 
When the pulmotor Is added to the 
equipment nothing will be lacking to 
handle accident cases, unless It might 
be having a surgeon stationed at head, 
quarters constantly. Duluth is yet a 
little small for that and Dr. Murphy, 
police surgeon offices but a short 
distaiice away, where he can be sum- 
moned In a very short time. 

BROKER WAS FOOLED. 

Lawyer Testifies in the Case of "Boy 
Financier." 

Chicago, May 22. — Further testimony 
bearing on the financial activities of 
the "boy broker, ' Butler R. Storke, was 
adduced today when H. H. Barnum, at- 
torney for Emil Wagner, a broker, took 
the witness stand in the suit of Mrs. 
Laura G. Rogers of Milwaukee, grand- 
mother of Storke, to recover $30,000 
from eight defendants. 

Storke, according to the witness, 
called up Wagner and arranged for 
stock transactions. Wagner believed 
the young man was acting for a brok- 
er, by whom Storke said he was em- 
ployed. Storke incurred liabilities of 
$10i000' before it was discovered that 
he was acting for himself. 

Storke offered $20,000 in stock of the 
Peunsvlvania Coal company as security 
for the liability. Storke had held this 
stock in trust, and when It was sold. 
witn<ss said, it became necessary to 
recover it from Wagner. Storke ex- 
tricated himself from this difficulty 
by substituting bonds of the Wau- 
wausee Inn company; which also were 
held in trust by him, pending sale. 
Witness added that he then began an 
investigation which ultimately resulted 
in Mrs. Rogers' turning over $30,000 
to protect her grand.inn. 

Forgan DmteH Thre^atn. 

David R. Forgan, piesldent of the 
National City bank, told his version of 
the conversation he had with Storke, 
in which conversation, Storke testified, 
Forgan had threatened to send the 
young tnan to prison. The bank presi- 
dent denied Storke's story. 

•'Young Storke came to the bank to 
see me," President Forgan said. "He 
began his talk by ref.rring to securi- 
ties that he had said his f.Tther would 
bring in. He said he could not bring 
them that day, but would the next 
morning. 

"I replied that I didn't believe he 
would be in the next morning; that I 
did not believe he had any securit!es. 
He answered by saying he always 
aimed to tell the truth. 'Well.' I an- 
swered 'voti haven't been known to hit 
the mark yet. If you think that is the 
wav to do business, you'll end up In 
Joliet.' " 

Mr. Forgan said he never threatened 
Storke. 



WILL INSPECT 

DULUTH PAVEMENTS. 

Mlnot, N. D., officials will be in Du- 
luth tomorrow or Saturday to inspect 
paving of this city. The officials In 
the party will be Nehemiah Davis, 
l)resldent of the commission; Commis- 
sioner Dewey Dorman and E. F. 
Thomas, city engineer. 

The commission is out on a junket of 
inspection and will visit Regina, Moose 
.law, Superior, the Twin Cities, Grand 
Forks and Fargo besides Duluth on the 
trip. The trip is taken prior to decid- 



THE PALM ROOM 

At the SPALDING 



MOST DELIGHTFUL AND LUXURI- 
OUS RESTAURANT IN DULUTH. 



ing what kind of pav^pient they Intend 
accepting for their own city. 

VOTES TO REPEAL 

" MARY A NN" LAW. 

Madison. Wis., May 22. — Democrats 
and Socialists accomplished their coup 
in the assembly today when they suc- 
ceeded in forcing the pas.sage of the 
Roessler bill, repealing the second 
choice primary law, known as the 
Mary Ann" law. Republicans of both 
factions united for its retentlo'n. The 
senate has yet to take action on this 
measure. 



DENVER VOTE IS 

NO T ALL COUNTED. 

Denver. Colo., May 22.— R'eturns of 
the result of the election for city com- 
missioners, auditor and on several 
charter amendments, indicate that John 
li. Hunter was elected commissioner of 
improvementa. J. M. Perkins, commis- 
sioner of social welfare; Alexander 
iSesbit. commissioner of public safety; 
Otto Thum. commissioner of property; 
Clair J. Pitcher, commissioner of fi- 
nance, and James F. Markev, auditor 

Markey has maintained a lead over 
all other aspirants for his office. No 
other candidates have received a plu- 
rality, according to present figures. 

"THE ART OF POLTTeVs-ESS." 

Manchester Guardian: One or two of 
the notices of Lord Wolselev's career 
mention the protracted dispute between 
Wolseley and !?lr William Russell as to 
the behavior of the troops In South 
Africa In 1879. 

Russell had accused the troops of 
drunkenne.=!s and looting in no uncertain 
terms. Wolseley defended his men with 
generous warmth, but the manner In 
which both Wolseley and Russell kept 
their regard for each other, each well 
knowing that the other spoke in sincer- 
ity, was a model of how a dispute of 
principle should be conducted between 
public men. 

Sir John Tennlel In Punch charming- 
ly hit off this polite yet furious quarrel 
in a cartoon. The cartoon was headed, 
"The Art of Politenes.s," and under- 
neath were the words: 

.'?Ir Garnet Wolseley — Pardon me. my 
dear doctor, if I gay that von have been 
hoaxed by gross exaggerations and 
transparent untruths. 

Dr. Russell — Forgive me, my daz- 
zling young general, for mentioning 
th.at you are a pig-headed Ignoramus 
and don't know what you are talking 
about. 



PERFECT 



— In men, a condition those possess- 
ing It are frequently most careless 
with, yet a priceless boon to those 
lacking It, can only be found In the 
vigorously healthy system. With the 
sutTerer from some special, private 
ailment — or chnuiic disease — there 
is not only the disease itself to 
cure, but the lack of vitality and 
nervous force due to defective nu- 
trition that may only be regain. d 
through some special agency. Thus 
the Progressiva Medical Doctors, 
with their latest scientific healing 
apparatus, which possesses a tre- 
mendous rejuvenating potency, have 
been successful even in cases" where 
the patient had given up In despair. 
Thus the treatment proved the turn- 
ing point to health in such cases. 
Nutrition was at last sn pulled, tlij 
wasted system built up ana the for- 
mer health and strength restored. 
If you are afTlicted, visit us and let 
us show you ample testimony from 
cured patients. 

Consultation free. Office hours 
from 9 to 8; Sundays, 10 to 1. 

PROGRESSIVE 
MEDICAL DOCTORS,inG 

I Wesf Soperior Street 






Ur^„ 09 1Q1<1 



16 



SLUMP AT 
M CLOSE 

Wheat Has a Reaction After 

Opening With a 

Bulge. 



Thursday, 



THE DULJJTH HERALD 



July— 

Huhith 

Minntapolls . . . 

^'hlcaj,'o 

\\ innlpeK 

Srpttrtiber — 

I^uliith 

-Mlnnfapolls . . . 

C'lUcHKO 

\\ innipt-K tOct) 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, MAY 21, 1913. 



May 22, 1913. 



Op«-n. 

.9l%b 
.9014-14 
.901*. -'4 
• 90 T4 



.91 
.90 Vi 



.91 1^ 

.90 >^" 
.90 •% 
.95 U 

.9m 

.91 «^ 

.89^4 

.90 1^ 



•5fe 



Low. 
.91 

.89% 
.89 78-90 
.941* 

.91 

.9014 

.89 «4 
.89 -\ 



Close. 
.91b 
.89 74 a 
.90b 

.94 V4 

.91 
.90>Hb 

.89\a 
.89 Vb 



May 21. 

.91 'A 
.90 1,4 a 
.90% 
.94% 

.91%b 
.90 %b 
.89a>,-%a 
.90 1,4 b 



r ago. 

1414 

13% 



l.lOH-14 

1.05 ',s-% 



iinoluvngod. 
lira II prices 



•flhipments, 
unchanged. 



49,463 bbl. 



1.051^ 

1.04 ^H. 
1.04;^- 



05 



Flax Is Lower With 
Amount of Trad- 
ing. 



Fair 



July 



July 

St-pteniber 
tK'tober . . 



DULUTH DURUM 

Open. HiKh. Low. 
.931/jb .93^ 

DULUTH LINSEED 

Onon. High. Low. 

1.33V»a 1.3314 1.321^ 

1.35 1.34%a 

1.34V4 1.33% 



MARKET. 




Clo.se. May 21. 
.93 Vi .93 kb 


Y'r ago. 
1.12 1^ 


MARKET. 




Clo.st-. May 21. 
1.32 -T^ a 1.3"3i.^b 
1.345.^a 1.3B%b 
1.33 ',i 1.34 Vsb 


Y'r ago. 

2.171^ 

i'.jo 



nuluth 
nortlit-rn. 



close: 



Duloth Ro.nrd of Trnde. May 22. — The 

enrly biilK«* In the Ki'nin market <I1h- 

Mppenred helTore the eloMO nnd (he op- 

tiooM ennie du^vn to earth nKaiu. .>fa>- 

>«heat eloMetl at a Iumm fruin jexter- 

daj'H clttwe <»f ■4e, mu did July, and 

Septemlier <>ptl<»n eli>»t»d at •'se olT. May 

and July duruiu olttNed uuebiiiiKed. The 

Mtreut;rth ^% a.H not NutVic-lent (<• NUNtnIn 
the nd>nnce «>( yeHterday and today 
hence the fall. 



xxu.r»vQy.^*M*~,"" *'T^- ^'^'''- ^ ^^''^- '*2c: No. 1 northern. 91c: No. 
vto- «n »'»><*i>^9c. No. 1 northern to arr he. 91c; Montana "" 

J^^^^- Nn'V'^nv''^ ;'"'y' ?^« ^'^'^- S^VU-mhvr, 91c. Durum 
9-\c. No. 2, 90»4c; to arrive, No. 1. 92^4c; No. 2, 90a4C 
Llnsee.l— On track. $1.31*4: to arrive, fl 31>4: Mav 
asked: September, |1.34% asked: October $].33V 

track 45V59^.'^^"^''' ^^^'^^^^ ^^^"^^^ 5fe(&5Sc: io arrive, 55(i,5J>c. Barley-On 
Klevator receipts of domestic grain — Wheat 194 72'i bn-- la«t vt^ar iRTOi 
bu; barley. 28.970 bu: flax. 23.246 bu: last year^ llVi^L; .'ye! M61 lu: Sat^s' 



No. 2 hard, 91c: 
-On track: No. 1. 
May, 92 Vic; July, 9314c. 
$1.31 i^j nominal; July, $1.32*4 
Oats— (tn track, 367^ ro^ay^i-; 



9,1'; 



year, 

3,000 



135,000 
bu; 



bu; 



barley. 



flax, 
last 



w . .^ ceipts of domestic grain — Wheat 

barley, 28,970 bu; flax. 23,2 
3 bu. 

ic Ai^n''!^'"*"."*^ °^ domestic grain— Wheat. 132.102 bu; last 
4S.019 bu; last year. 42.337 bu; oats. 4.500 bu; last rear 
year. 580 bu. " ' 

nflx*^Q7-*'ft'h..''^7*^*^ ""' ^'*a,'^^'\ ^^i-"'"— ^^heat, 25.730 bu; last year. 9.823 bu; 
122i bu ^^'"' ' • °^^^' ^•^^" ^^'' ^'^^^ ^''■^''' ^-^^^ *^"; barley! 

' '?ekT4J6^°bun"arl^y^?3:20T^^^^^^ '''■''' ""''' ''''' ^"^'•' ''''''' ^"= °^^«- 



- , I..ll*«']rp6«»l Grain. 

Llvcrnool. Way 22. — Wheat — Spot 
f rm; No. 2 M^^nitoba. Th 6iAd; No. 3 
Manltf.ba. Ts 4V^<I, futures frnn; May. 
la t.^jQ; July. 78 6%d; October, 7b 3%d. 
Lorn— Spot steady; American mixed, 
new, 5s Vad; American mi.\ed, new, 
klla dried, 5s lifcd; do. old. 58 llVjd; 
do old, via yalvj^s^ton. 5s Sd; futures 
steady; July ^Jiwa- I'lata). 5s !4d. 

New Vurk Cirain. 

Nfv York. May 2i'.— Close: Wheat- 
May. \i'J%c\ Jul.v, SKc; September, 9C-'>4c. 

BOSTON COPPER STOCKS. 



Closing 
& Sturgis. 



Liated Stock*— 



Quotations furnished by Gay 
320 West Superior street: 

Bid. I AsketL 



last 



the grain 

hour had 

it mure 

strength. 

was higii. r and 

market hugged 



Vigorous attempts to bull 
market today, up to a late 
succeeded oiily in giving 
than ordinary steadiness and 
The opening in wheat 
the operations of the 
closely to the opening figure. All news 
was bullish, coming from various quar- 
ters, and cablts were strong, foreign 
markets opening at an advance and 
going still higher to the close. But 
that made no difference. Further -e- 
porls of damage in the Southwest, 
backing the reports of yesterday, de- 
spite further denials coming from the 
sanic qu.irter. caused a stiffening. Ad- 
vices to the effect that the Canadian 
wheat crop of last year was over- 
estimated and that all of it is now In 
transit, holding out the hope that for- 
tlgn markets must soon turn to this 
side of the line for e.xport. was another 
slight factor. So was the report of 
some export business from Baltimore 
yesterday. But only steadiness was the 
result. 

July wheat opened at an advance of 
'fcC. and continued to tluctuate around 



17.453.000 bu, net 



crease. 21,000 bu. 

Total all grains, 
decreaBe, 351,000 bu. 

* * • 

Wheat stocks in Minneapolis have 
decreased In Ave days. 800,000 bu; (lour 
shipments were 49,463 bbl. 

• • * 

More news is coming in from vari- 
ous points in Kansas today concern- 
ing winter wheat conditions there- 
abouts. Wichita wired today: 

"Kan-Siis acreage is much in excess of 



We have ample 
throughout the 
lose sight of the 
moisture we have 
no high tempera- 
hot winds. Tlio 
the last precipita- 
vicinlty of Engle- 



the opening ligure to Uc up. Septem- 
ber option adopted exactly the same 
tactics except that it did not have an 
opeiiing figure. July durum kept 
around yesterday's closing tlgure to 
4'c^'.»c higher. Other wheat options 
Were inactive. 

Slamp In Flax. 
The flax market indulged In a slump 
today and on the decline there were a 
pood many buying orders. Business 
in fact was the briskest in some days. 
May fl.ix closed i^c over yesterday, 
without activity. July and September 
flax lost *4c each net and October flax 
fell off Ic. It is believed that the buy- 
ing was not a covering of shorts or to 
fill small ordt rs. but that it was done 
as a matter of good business on the 
low price already established and the 
decline following. 



No. 
No 
No. 
No. 
.No. 
.No. 
No. 
Nt.. 
Nii. 
No. 
No. 

Nn 

No 

.No 

N<. 

Nf. 

No. 

Uarlry, 

Barle}'. 

BarW. 

Ilarley. 

15iU-|«'.v, 

Barley 

l)at.<. 

Onii, 

Oats. 

Oat*. 

OUs. 

0.:te, 

(tata. 

Oit». 

()at«. 

oata, 

N 

N 



CaNh Salea 

hard, 1 car 

iiortlit-ni. 1. 41.10 bu. 

norlheni. 11 care . 
northern. 1 c»r . . . . 

mirtliern. 4.400 bu. 

iii'rth«rrn. 4 cars . . . 
tmUierii. 3 oais . . . . 

nnitheni. 1.000 bu. 
111111 htru. 5 cars . . . . 

northern. 1 ear 

nilseil. 1 car 



No. 
No. 
No. 

-N>. 
No. 

No. 



grtile, 1 c»r 

graiie, 1 car 

irraile. 1 car 

1 liuniui. l.Ooo bu, to 

2 (liinini. 1 car 

1 mixed. 1 c»r 

2 cars 

2 c.irs 

'2 cars 

4 cais 

1 car 

1 car 

2.0ro 1.11, 3-W, to arrive. . 

2.000 bu 

1 car, 3-W 

1 oar, 4-W 

2 cars. 3-W 

l.OOO bu, 3-W. to arrive.. 
I,.f00 bu, 3-W. to arrive.. 
2.000 bu. 3-W. to arrive 

1 car. 4-W 

IM bu. 24 lb. 

rv*". 1 car ... 

mixed barley, 

flax. 1 car . . 
ri:ix. 1 ciir . 



ThurMdny. 

$ .92% 

to arrive 91% 

Ul'3 

91 \ 

to arrive 91*4 

91 '4 

91% 

to arrive 91 W 

8»% 

804 

8li>i 

86'/4 

874 

894 

arrive 93 

914 



3-0 



1 car 



flax. 2 cnr<i 



Hax. 
flax 

fl.ix. 



1.500 bu. 
1 car . 

1 car . . . 



to arrive. 



MARKET GOSSIP. 



. .92% 
. .49 
. .48 
. .50 
, .51 
.53 
.54 
.37\ 
.38 
.374 
.36% 
.37 
.374 
.87% 
.36 4 
.36 4 
.3.5 
.58 
.64 
1.32'i 
1.32U 
1.32 ■ 
1.32 
l.;i0'4 
1.30% 



July puts. 89^4^ "ttc; calls. gO^ltUc. 
• • « 

Oats closed in the Duluth market to- 
day at an advance of =v,c. 
« « « 

Duluth car Inspection: Wheat — No. 
1 northern. 22; No. 2 northern, 3: No. 



3, 2; no grade, 
■wheat, 31. last 
year 18; rye. 5; 
barley, 12; corn, 
fey, last year 27; 



durum. 5; total 

year 8: flax. 19. last 

oats, 9. last year 1; 

1; total of all grains, 

on track, 115. 

* « * 

Jacksfon Brn«. & Co. of riilcajo and Puluth hare 
bsiiKl the fiiUowlng report 'n »prinB wh^at cor.ill- 
tions in the Northwest on .May 17: 

.'Jfand. Acreaife. 

. . . Not up. . . . 25 per-ceiit less. 

... Not up 30 per cem less. 

, . . Not n>. . 
, . . Nut iv. . 
.. Thin.... 
.. Thin..., 
..Tfilck. .. 

.Fair 

...Kalr.... 

Fair 

..Tlilck... 

D. Thick... 

. .. Meilium 

. . Medium 

Meilliim 

Sfedlum 

Sfediuni 

Tlilck. . . 

..Thick... 

.TIilcK. 



T'wn and 
renihliia, N. 
t^tniitia. '"en. 
Pr^den. N. 
'■ ■■ 'ast 

R 

;. •. s. 

nyde. N K 



K. N. !».. 

N. n 

K. N. D. . 

N. I> 

E. N. D... 
F* N. D... 

N. n.... 



Plrkerf. K fen. N. D 
Sherwood, N. N. D.... 
l.a(,iidoii, N. v.. N. D.. 
.Atnfnia. Kast N. P.... 
Willow rity, N. r. N. 

O-ikp*. S. E. .N. D 

^thlnf. N. W. N. P 

Jamt^town. 8. F- N. D. 
l-aiuU. N. C. N. P.... 

Vrm. N. E. N. P 

Ifoxhoroe. W. C. Minn.. 
Fn-iiih, W. C. Mlim. 
Felton. W C. Minn 



. 15 per cent less. 

. Same. 

. Same. 

. 10 |)er Pent more. 

. 1 5 per cent less. 

. .20 per cent more. 

. ..*!.i me. 

^10 percent less. 

. S.Tme. 

. 1 per cent le?,". 

.30 percent less. 
..'' per cent less. 
. ..".■' me. 
. . 25 per cent more 

. 10 per cent more. 

.10 per cent more. 
.#10 percent more. 
...Siimr. 



,20 



P«' cpnt more. 
20 per cent more. 



ISrooten. W. C. Minn.... Medium, 

liilbtrtson. East. M.^tit. . .Tulcic. . . 
« • * 

Duluth grain stocks, showing chang- 
es in four days up to last night: 

Wheat — Western and winter, 19,000 
bu, increase. l.ftOO bu; spring, 9.41. '",000 
bu. increase. H9.f"f»o bu: dururn. 377- 
000 bu. increase. 26.000 bu; bonded 2 - 
092.000 bu. decrease. 310.000 bu; net' de- 
crease. 1^4,000 bu. 

Oats — 1.014.000 bu. decrease. 129.000 
bu; rye. 3fi.000 bu. increase, 5.000 bu 
barley. r)91,o00 bu decrease, 84.000 bu 
flax, domestic, 2.1.-)1,000 bu, bonded 1 ." 
7.'.x,'hj0 bu; total flax, 3,909,000 bu ' de- 



the normal stand, 
moisture generally 
state and must not 
fact that with what 
had there have been 
tares and the usual 
territory affected by 
tlon is mostly in the 

wood and Ashland, which is a grazing 
country and unimportant so far as the 
crops are concerned. Kansas should 
have 100,000,000 to 110,000.000 bu of 
wheat and this is figuring conserva- 
tively." 

• • * 
Kansas City wires: 
"Frcfi K. I-arrabee, president of the 

Larrabee mills at Hutchinson. Kan., 
here today, says reports of wheat dam- 
age are grossly exaggerated. Mr. I..ar- 
rabee is about the biggest miller, bank 
and farm owner in Southwest Kansas." 

• • • 
Boston wires: Cables for cash wheat 

pay no attention to our advance al- 
though as much out of line as before. 

• » m 

Special news of Russian crops is 
cabled by Broomhall of London as fol- 
lows: 

"Frost has occurred Jn the Volga dis- 
trict and many reports say there is 
damage to spring wheat but the acre- 
age is a large one and the prospects 
are generally favorable for a good 
yield. Crop prospects are generally 
good and this is particularly true of 
winter wheat and rye in the Don ter- 
ritory, which supplies a large percent- 
age of the arrivals at Rostoff. Ship- 
ments are expected to Increase soon, 
but it is certain that very little of this 
will come to the ITnited Kingdom. '• 

• • • 

Other foreign crop news from the 
same source follows: 

Argentine — Estimate of wheat ship- 
ments this week. 2.400.000 bu. last 
week, 2.4G0.000 bu. last year. 3.792.000 
bu. Corn, this week, 4,250.000 bu, last 
week, 4.157.000 bu. last year, 4.065.000. 
The seeding of the new crop is being 
favored by irood weather conditions. 

India — Recent heavy rains in north- 
ern portion of the United Provinces 
will delay the movement of wheat. 

France — According to an official re- 
port dated May 1, the wheat condition 
was 74 per cent against 75 per cent 
last year: of oats. 73 per cent against 
75 per cent last year. 

Russia — Our agent 
states that the crops In 
are excellent but that 
will be required shortly. 

• • • . 
Clearances reported today are: 

Wheat. 511.000 bu; flour. 15.000 bbl: 
corn. 2,000 bu; oats, 220.000 bu; wheat 
and flour together equal. 579,000 bu. 

• * * 

Primarv markets report today: 
Wheat — Receipts. 536.000 bu. last 

vear 314.000 bu: shipments. 551.000 bu, 

last year, 506.000 bu. 

Corn — Receipts, 292,000 bu. last vear. 

268,000 bu: shipments, 230,000 bu, last 

year, 3S3,000 bu. 

« • • 

A wire from Minneapolis has the 
following to say concerning Canadian 
wheat: 

"All information In reports indicates 
that thp Canadian crop was over-esti- 
mated last year, and that farmers have 
nothing on hand. Present leceipts are 
from wh^at in transit E.xporters own 
all May ind July options as well as 
the cash wheat and have the bulk of It 
sold abroad. The controversy on the 
sight drafts has been settled, and for- 
eigners are again In the market, bids 
being only fractionally out of line to- 
day. It would seem that if foreigners 
have difficulty In obtaining the neces- 
sar.v supi)lies in Canada, the demand 
will spread to American wheat." 
« • • 

Kansas City wires: A letter was 
rec -Ived here from Lincoln Center. 
Kan,, says: 

"Wheat has gone back during the 
past two weeks and we figure on only 
half a crop In this vicinity." 
« * • 

New York: Partlett-Frazier reoort 
that 300.000 bu No. 2 hard wheat was 
worked yesterday, 200,000 of which 
went to Baltimore exporters. 

♦ • • 

grain receipts: Wheat, 
cars: total. 4 cars. 

* * * 

Wednes- 
r'ars of wheat received: dav. 



had been materially reduced In twen- 
ty-nine counties west and south led 
to a rally. The close, however, was 
weak with July •'S,c net lower at 90c. 

in corn as in wheat a rush of buy- 
ing caused a little advance which was 
met by liberal selling. Julv opened i^c 
E-, ■*.^-*l'^^>^'" ^t >'>''8c to 5 7 ',4c, touched 
'')04tf5,%c and fell back to 57c. 

A decided upturn ensued on account 
or purchases by leading speculators. 
The close though, was easy at 57^c 
for July, a gain of -^c. 

Oiits were relatively firm owing to 
statements that despite rain the Illi- 
nois c rop showed serious damage. 
.July, which started unchanged to »4c 
higher at 37iAc to 37%c. sold at 37%® 
3.=^ic but later sagged to S7isc. 

Packers, selling weakened provisions. 
First transactions ranged from last 
night's level to 5c below, iiuluding 
September as fulk)ws: Pork. $19.35; 
lard. $11,021^ to $11.05; ribs, $11.07 1^. 

1.08 3^; No. 3 red. 96c(ft$1.02: No. 2 hard 
92i4rf, 94a.^c; No. 3 hard, 91(S93c; No 1 
northern, 93(^94a,c; No. 2 northern. 91 
l^y3>ic; No. 3 northern, 90 to 93c; No 
2 spring. 91(a93c; No. 3 
91c; No. 4 spring. 80('aS9c: 
90(?i95c: durum, 90«&96c 
.S^!^^.~^°- 2. 58® 58 •14c: No. 2 white, 
613.4 1{ 6214c: No. 2 yellow. 58i4®59c: 
^>o. 3. 57^4 58 1,4c; No. 3 white, ei^Affi 
62c; No. 3 yellow, 58® 58 14c; No 4 5714 

-i'lfVr^?- ^ white, 61c; No. 4 yellow. 
y7M!(&'57%lc: 

Oats— No. 2 white. 41i^c: No. 
No. 3 white, 39V4'&40i4c; No. 4 
aS^j 'g:39-\c; standard, 4014 f?i 41i/ic 
cc'^^\' ^y*^' 63irt63%c: barley. 50® 
bSc: timothy. $2. 85ra 3.60; clover nom- 



Adventure 

Agr. Chem. .'.*.'.'.','.'.' 

Ahmeek 

Algoiuah '.'.'.'.'.'. 

Allouez 

Amalgamated !!!!!! 

ArcatUan 

Arizona Commercial. 

Boston & Corbln . . . 

Butte & Ballaklava 

Butte & Superior . . 

Chlno 

Calumet & Arizona!. 
Calumet & liecli. . . . 

Centennial 

Copper Range 

Daly West 

East Boston 

East Butte 

Franklin 

Ciroux 

Granby ....".'.'.'. 

(Jreene Cananea .... 

Hancock 

jntJiana !....'.', 

Inspiration 

Isle lioyale 

Kerr Lake 



ADVANCES 
INJTOCKS 

Are in Scant Supply Except 

at Steadily Rising 

Prices. 



spring. 90® 
velvet chaff. 



3, 37c; 
white. 



inal 
11.03: 

Wheat- 
-May . . . 
.Tuly . . . 
Sept . . . 
Dec . ... 

Cfrn — 
.Maj . . . 
July . . . 
.Sept . . . 
Dec ... 

Oats- 
May . . . 
July ... 
Sot)t . . . 
Dec 

Pork- 
July . . . 
Sert . . . 

Lard — 
.May . . . 
July . . . 
Sept . . . 

Sliort 
May . 
July . . 
Sept 



Pork. $19.'; 
ribs. $11.50 



•'1, 



Oi)en. 

.81H-^ 
.56%-% 

• 55H-% 

.39H-S4 
.37%-% 
.36%-37 
.37% 



lllKll. 

.0214 
.9034 
.83'i 
.01% 



Vi : lard, 
.00. 



$11.02%© 



19.65 
19.35 



,.11.00 

.10.95 

. .n.02%-05 
Klb.s— 

.11.92% 

.11.22% 

..n.07% 



.57% 
.57% 
.58%- 
.56%- 

.41 

.37%4 

.38% 

19.67% 
19.33 

11.02% 
10.97^ 
11.05 



11.23 
11.07% 



.91% 
.8&%- 
.89% 
.91% 

.5676 
.57 

.57% 
.53% 



90 



Close. 

.91% 
.90 
.89% 
.91% 

.57% 
.57% 
.57%- 
.56 



58 



Keweenaw 

Lake 

La «alle 

.Mayflower 

-Mass Gas 

Mass Copper 

Mason Valley 

Miami 

Michigan 

Mohawk 

-Nevada Consolidated 

.N'll)issing 

•North tuitte 

North Lake 

Old Dominion 

Ojibway 

Osceola 

Pond Creek 

Quincy 

Ray Consolidated . . . . 

Shannon .... 

Shattuck 

yiioe Machinery 

Superior & Boston . . . 
Superior Copper .... 

Swift • 

Alaska 

Tamarack .... . . . . , 

Trinity 

Tuolumne 

C S. Mining con mon. 

United Fruit '.. 

I'tah Con 

Utah Copper 

Victoria 



Final Dealings Character- 
ized By Dullness and 
Close Steady. 



GAV &L SXURGIS 

326 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

Members of the New York and Boston Stock Exchanges. 

Listed Securities including FRACTIONAL 

LOTS bought and sold on both exchanges 

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO LOCAL SECURITIES 

Direct Private Wire to 
Boston, New YorK, Detroit, Chicago, Houghton and Calumet. 
We have a full and complete Statistical Department, which is at 
your service at all times. Correspondence solicited. 
R T. Goodell, Resident Manager. W. J. North. Assistant Manacer 

'Phones, ""'" 



Both 



2210. 



New 

timtnt 
today. 



Theie 
leading 
today, 
readily 



47 1^ 



StOCfcN 

Michigan 
Gas 



39% 


.40% 


37% 


..37% 


36% 


.37% 


37% 


.38 



19.60 

19.27%-.' 

10.95 

10.92% 

11.00 



■38 



19.07% 
19.35 

11.02% 

10.93-97% 

11.02% 



11.20 
11.02% 



05 



92% 

23 

07% 



at NIcolaleff 
the Southwest 
general rains 



CORN AND WHEAT BULLETIN 

hours ending at 8 a. m., Thurs- 



For the twenty-four 
day. May 2i: 



STATIO.NS. 



Duluth bonded 
cars; flax. 2 



Duluth 

Minneapolis . 
Winnipeg . . . 

Chicago 

Kansas City . 
St. Louis, bu. 



34 

... 178 
306 

17 
. . .23.000 
. . .23.000 

r 

Wednos- 



A GOOD FIRM TO SHIP 
YOUR GRAIN TO 

ATWOOD-IARSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Special attention driven to chMh 
grain*. We give all shipment* our 
personal attention. 

DLLLTH. MI2tf?rECAl*OLI9. 



Cars of linseed received: 

"Duluth 

Minneapolis 

Winnipeg 

♦ • • 

Foreign closing cables: 
Wheat. %d to Id higher 
changed. Paris — Wheat. 
Berlin — Wheat. %c higher, 
holiday 



dav. 
19 
24 

127 



Year 

ago. 

8 

8S 

213 

31 

25.000 

18.000 

Tear 

ago. 

8 

22 

29 



Minneapolis ... 
.Meiandria .... 

(arapbeli 

Crooksion 

Detroit City ... 
.Montevideo . . . . 

New Ulm 

Park Haplda ... 

Rocluater 

WInncbagu City 
WorthlnKton . . , 
.Mitcliell 

Polloclj 

itedfleld 

Sioux Falls .... 

Slsseton 

Watertown 

Yankton 

Aiuenia 

Bottineau 

Bowbells 

Dickinson 

Fes-seiulen 

Grafton 

Jamestown 

I.angdon 

Larimure , 

l.M)on 

•Minot 

Niipdleon 

Pembina 

Wiihpeicn 

Billings 

SlHiliith 

S-M'Orhead 

JSt. Paul 

JLa Crosse 

SHuion 

SPlcrre 

Jllapld City 

SHi.smarrk 

§ Devils Lake ... 
jc.rand Forks .. 

SWillljston 

{Havre 

5.Mlles City 

JtMinnedosa 

JtWlnnlpeR 

StQu'.-ippeile . .. . 



(State of 
weather 



..Pt. 
'.'vi.' 



.Pt. 



.Pt, 



.Clou(1.v 
.C'loudi' 
.Clear 
Cloudy 
-Clear 
Cloudy 

Cloudy 

..Pt. Cloudy 

Cloudy 

,.Pt. Cloudy 

Cloudy 

. Clear 

Cloudy 

. . Clear 

.Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Clear 

Cloudy 

Clear 

..Pt. Cloudy 

Clear 

Clear 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

■ Cloudy 

Clear 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Clear 

Clear 

lialninj 

Clear 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Clear 

Cloudy 

Clear 

Clear 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

. .Pt. Cloudv 
. .Pt. noudy 

Clear 

. .Pt. noudy 

Cloudv 

. .Pt. Cloudy 



Temperature 



c 
_3_ 
50 
48 
50 
50 
58 
50 
50 
44 
50 
30 
48 

54 

52 

50 

50 

54 

48 

52 

48 

54 

50 

50 

52 

32 

50 

56 

52 

50 

52 

50 

50 

48 

72 

42 

48 

52 

52 
54 
56 
52 
54 
52 
54 
68 
64 
58 
62 
52 



R.iln- 
fa. 






42 


1 


40 





36 





36 





84 





42 





42 





38 


.01 


42 





42 





40 


.02 


44 





28 





42 





42 





38 





40 





46 





34 





40 





32 





30 





38 





34 





34 





40 


n 


.?6 





30 





36 





80 





38 





34 


fl 


36 





38 


.12 


36 





44 


.01 


64 





40 





42 





36 


.08 


34 





44 





:^6 





36 





44 





42 





** 





46 1 





36 1 






Winona . 
Wolverine 

Zinc 

InllHted 
Arizona & 
Bay State 
Begole 

Bohemia 

Boston El.v 

Butte Central 

Butte & London 

Cactus 

CaLaveras 

Chief Consolidated . . . 

Corbln Copper 

Cortez 

Crown Reserve 

Davis Daly 

Dobie 

Dome Kxtenslon 

Ely Consolidated 

First Xatlonal 

Ooldfleld Consolidated. 

Hollinger I 

Houghton 

I. a Rose | 

Mines Co. of America..! 

Montana 1 

New Baltic 

Ohio Copper 

Oneco 

Rearl T.ake 

Porcupine Gold . 

Preston 

Raven 

Smokey Dev 

South Lake 

.-Southwestern Miami . . 

.Superior & Globe 

Ttnilskaming 

Tonopah 

Tonopah Belmont 

Tonopah Extension . . . 
I'nited Verde Extension 

West End 

Wettlaufer 

Yukon 



16c I 

1% I 

1 9-i6;i 

45c I 

1 7-161 
21c 

7 c 
3 1-16 

ly* 

80c 
30c 
3^4 

2 9-16 
10c 

8c 

5c 

1% 

[ 15-16 

17c 

2 7-16 

2% 
1 5-16 

90c 

80c 

95c 

4r>c 

l.'ic 

2c 

4c 

1 

514 

2c 

5c 
34c 

5 

6 1/4 

2% 
68c 

1 
14c 

2 'A 



15c 
17c 
21A 

11 -le 

60c 

1 9-16 
24c 

9c 
3 5-16 

1% 
90c 
40c 

4 

2% 
35c 
12c 
10c 

2 

2 1-16 
18c 

3Vk 

2% 

2% 
1 9-16 

1 
»0c 
99c 
55c 
25c 

6c 

8c 

IVi 

5-V4 

3c 
15c 
38c 

5«(, 

6% 

2% 
72c 

Ui 
IRc 

2% 



York, May 22. — Speculative sen- 
Improved In the stock market 
Although further weakness was 
exhibited by a few minor railroad and 
industrial shares, the representative 
stocks, after an Initial period of heav- 
iness, ruled slightly higher on the day. 
The fact that a good market existed 
for the New York City bonds at par 
or better was regarded as reassuring. 
Rumors of forthcoming favorable 
developments were circulated in con- 
nection with a number of stocks, but 
speculative interest was too small to 
permit of energetic bull movements. 
Fronds were irregular. 

was active selling of t\u- 
stocks at the opening 
but offerings were absorbed 
and the list held near 
yesterdays close. National Railways 
of Mexico second preferred and Cana- 
dian Pacific declined a point and Balti- 
more & Ohio convertibles reached a 
new low price at 92. Reading wa.s un- 
changed on large sales and slight frac- 
tional losses were recorded for th<> 
other leaders. The lirst sale of the 

^n'ii'T.^}"';*^ ^''^>' ^''2's was a block of 
400,000 at par. 

Brisli buying of individual stock.< 

nfused a better tone into the mar- 

Ket but the demand for the recognized 

Tr.n«u ''^V''^^t?\ ^'^'^t. Brooklyn 
Iransit and Consolidated Gas were de- 
cidedly strong and Canadian Pacific 
rallied considerably. 

The market gave a good 
of strength in the e.ailv 
and became slightly strong. 

Reading. Lehigh Vallev, Cnion Pa- 
cific and Southern Pacific were the 
strongest. Low priced copper shares 
were bought heavily on dividend ru- 
mors. 

Shorts were much perturbed over the 
aggressive rise in prices without ap- 
parent change in speculative condi- 
tions to explain it. Stocks were in 
scant supply except at steadily rising 
figures, .and the ease with which Union 
Pax-ific jumped 2V, and Reading 1; 
points testified to the over-extended 
short position in these properties 

Advances of between 1 and 2 points 

th*r"o^ugh"Vh;'i7^t. ""'''■''' ^'"^■'•^"^ ^" 

The market closed steady. The up- 
ward movement was checked when the 
Harnman stocks weakened on profit- 
taking. Offerings were not pressed 
on the market extensively and the 
final dealings were characterized bv 
dullness and a return to steadiness 



1.2s 
1.25 

i.'25 



1.75 

1.50 
1.25 



.60 

1.4S 

.75 

3.40 

3.15 

.60 

1.50 

2.25 

2.25 

1.15 

1.50 

1.25 

6.00 

1.35 

2.00 

2.50 

.90 

.60 

.14 

.60 

.30 

2.00 

1.10 

2.50 

.45 

.40 

.75 

1.90 

.40 

.85 

.65 

.50 



exhibition 
afternoon 



Closing quotations furnished by Gay 
& Sturgic. 326 West Superior street; 



STOCIvS— 



High. I Low. I Close. LMay 21 



Sflrtwiiy H«»r.Me Market. 

Minnesota Transfers, .'^ . Paul. .Minn.. May 22.— 
Barrett & Zlnimerman re.xirt: Market Is less active 
than yisterday. Tliere tvus a fair demand lor de- 
liverj- liorees from local retail intere,sts. Sliort car 
sliipraeuts v^ere made to t. number of points lu Wis- 
consin and Minnesota. Todaj 'a receipts included 
ab'Ut a hundred head of draft and general purpose 
horses. Valuc<j as follows: 

Drafters, ext ra 

Drafters, elioic© 

I>ri.fiers, coaimon to good 

Fiirni hoi-sea and mares. e::tra 

Farm horses and marcs, choice 

Faira horses, common to jood 

Delivtrj- 

Drivers and saddlers 

Mules, according to size 



...$175(<?235 
... 125(1.175 
... 93 ("12.'') 
, .. 125C'175 
, .. 93 w 125 
. . 65vr 95 
... 103(3 215 
. . 103^200 
. . 105(3 230 



Amalgamated . . 

Anaconda 

American Can. . . 

do pfd 

Am. Cotton Oil . . 
Am. Teleph. Co. . 
Am. Smelting. . . 
Am. Locomotive. 

-\tchlson 

Baltimore & O. . 
Biooklvn R. T. . 
Can. I'acific ... 
Cal. Petroleum. . 
Colo. Fuel & I. 

Cliino 

Ches. & Ohio... 
Consolld. Gas. . . 

Erie 

Erie first 

Gt. N. pfd 

Gt. N. Ore 

General Electric 
Guggenheim ... . 

111. Central 

Interbor. pfd. . . 

Lehigh 

Louis. & Nash.. . 
Mex. Petroleum. 
Missouri Pacific 
N y. Central . . 

Nevada Con 

Northern Pac. . . 
New Haven .... 
Ontario & West. 
Pennsylvania 
People's Gas . . 

Ray Con 

Reading 

Rock Island . . . 
do pfd 



74 Ti 731/i 

37'^ 37 ?4 

33 'i 321^ 

93 92% 

41 39% 

128% 128% 

67^4 66% 

33 '/fe 32% 

99% 99 

9Si.» 98 3,4 

91% 91 %[ 

238 i,i 235% 1237^4 

38 361/^1 36% 

31 »^ 30141 :ni^ 

40% SS%\ 4014 

651^1 64% 651^ 
133i^ll31%ll.'',2-s 
2SV4I 28% 

126%' 
33 
138 34 



37% 

32 34 

93 

41 

128% 
67 J^ 
331,8 
99% 
981/4 
91% 



2^%j 
4314 



RF-MARKS- 
sissipDl valley 



-Rains 
states. 



fell 



over 
H. W 



tlie Ohio and MIs- 
HICH.VRnsO.V. 
Local Forcca.-ter. 



5— Not Included 
t — Maximum of 
♦—HI 



In the district arerares. 
.ve^terday, minimum of last night. 



ending at 8 



^ m., 



Liverpool — 

corn, un- 

V>c higher. 

Budapest — 



CHICAGO MARKET. 



lftlie«t yesterday. 

t — Lowest for twenty-four hours 
seventy-fifth meridian time. 

Note— The aver.Tge highest and lowsst temperatures 
are made up »t each center from the actual number 
of reports received, and the average rreclpltations 
from the number of staUons reporting 10 
more. The "state of weatlier" is that 
time of observation. 



liOndoo .StoekM. 

London, May 22 — American securi- 
ties opened quiet and a fraction hlKher. 
but most of the 1 st eased off under 
realizing before noon. Light New 
York buying hardened prices in the 
late trading and the market closed 

steady. 

■> 

South St. Paul I..lvesiook. 

South Pt. P.-;ul. Minn.. .May 22.— Cattle— Receipts, 
800; killers, steady; .steers. $0.30^«8. 10; cows-heifcrs, 
$4.50(g7.23; calves, 25c higher, J5.00@8.75; feeder.', 
steady, $4.3067.75. 

IIf,g5 — Receipts. 2,000; liteady; range, |8.15@8.45; 
bulk, $8.30{n8.35. 

^Iipep^ — ReiH'ipts, 100; sti«dy; shoni laml)s, $4..')0@ 
7.2.'; shorn wethers, io.W!i').'o. Shoni ewes, $2.00 
(3 5.50. 



Rubber 
Southein Pac. 

Sugar 

South rn Ry. , 

St. Paul 

St. Louis & S 
Texas Oil . . . '. 

T'nlon Pac 

Steel, common . 

Steel, pfd 

Utah Copper . ... 

Vlr. Chem 

West. Electric .. 

Woolworth 

New York sale 

11 a. m 

Noon 

1 u. m 

2 p. m 
Total 



33 

13934 

47% 
11334 

51% 
156% 
13334 

64% 

35% 
100 S4 

16% 
115% 
105%: 105 

29 I 29 



% 



47 
113 

5i % 
154% 
132 

6314 

34% 
100 

16% 
114% 



73% 

33% 

9234 

391,4 
128% 

67% 
32% 
99% 
98% 
91% 

237 
38% 
31% 
39 
04% 

131% 
28y4 



126% 

138% 

47 
114% 

50 "4 
154 3.ji 



1 - ' '.* 

33 
139% 
I 47 %1 
113% 

51% 
155% 
133% 

64% 63K. 

35 35 
100% 100 

16% I ]6-\ 
115%|114% 
105% 105 

29 I 28% 



Rome Beauties 

Ken Davis 

Black Bens 

Ml!R'ellaneoua varieties 

<JKKKN VEGKTABLK8— 

A/iparagti.-*. H. O.. doz 

Asparagus, extra fancy, crt 

Afiparagiis, extra fancy, doz , 

Be.'ins, wax, lipr , 

Beans, green, lipr , 

Beets, bbl, doz , 

Beets, new, hpr , 

Cauliflower, bu 

Cauliflower, crt 

Carrots, box and lipr 

Cukes, extra fancy, doz 

Cukes, fancy, doz 

Cukos. crt 

l..ettuce, Minneapolis, box 

Lettuce, head, hpr 

Lettuce, head, crt 

Lettuce, head, doz 

Mint, doz 

Onions, fc'reen, H. O., dos 

Oyster plant, doz 

Pansics, doa 

Peas, hpr 

Pieplant, Illinois, box 

Peppers, extra fancy, crt 

Peppers, bskt 

Parnley, fancy 11. IT., doz 

Radishes. G. H. . round, doz 

Radishes, long, hpr 

Radishes, long, doz 

.«!plna«ih, H. G. bu 

Rhlvcs, box 

Watercress, bskt 

CKLERY— 

Florida. 3-5 doz crta., ert 

Florida, doz 

TOMATOES— 

F'lorlda. crt 

Florida, bskt , 

ONION SETS— 

White, bu , 

Yellow, bu 

VEGETABIJES— 

Bermuda onioas, crt 

Indiana yellow onions, 100-lb sacks, sk 

Minnesota red onlcns, cwt 

Bagas, cwt 

Beets, cwt 

Beets, washed, bu 

Spanish onions, crt 

Carrots, washed, bu 

Carrots, cwt 

Cabbage, new. crt 

Parsnli«, cwt 

Horse radish, bid 

Horse radish, bu 

Navy beans, bu 

POTATOES— 

Fancy Burbanks, bu 

New potaloe*. bu 2 

New potatoes, bbl ,. g 

Sweet potatoes, bu 2 

BUTTKJ{— 

Creamery, per lb 28® 

Dairy, per lb 2i(S 

Oleomargarine 

CHEESE— 

Twins 

New York twlji* 

Block Swiss, per lb. No. 1 

Wheel Swiss, per lb. No. 1 

Prlmost 

Brkk cheese, pet lb 

EGGS— 

Fresh. No. 1. cases 

Fresh, dirties. ca.ses 

Fresh. No. 1, checks 

MEATS— 

Beef, per lb 

Mutton, [.er lb 

Pork loins, per lb 

Veal, per lb 

Lamb, per lb 

Lard, per lb 

FUKSH DRESSfD POULTRY— 

.Stag roosters, per lb 

Springs, per lb 

FR0Zi-:3»; Pta'LTOY— 

Hens, per lb 

Geese, per lb 

Dry picked turkeys 

Springs, i>er lb 

LIVK POULTRY— 

Hens, per IL 20 

Springs, per lb ' jg 

Stag roosters 14 

rh« above auotatjoos Indicate what the retailers 
pay to the wholesaler. The hay prices below are 
what the farmers receive from the jobbers: 

HAY— 

No. 1 timothy, per t^n $13.0«@14.00 

2 timothy, per ton 10.50(512 50 

1 mixed timothy, per ton 10.00@12!oo 

2 mixed timothy, per ton 7.00(5: 9 oo 

1 prairie, per ton 11. 00(412.00 

S.(Hi& 9.00 



Emanuel Yngve, 
Flynn, Carlton. 



Cambridge; Joha 



.18H@ 



..10® 
..12® 
..14® 
..12® 
..14® 



.20® 



.25 
.25 

.75 
.85 



. 2.25 
2.25 

1.40 

1.25 

.90 

.90 

1.25 

1.00 

I.. 50 

1. 00 

1.25 

3.50 

1.50 

4.75 

.08 

2.45 



44 

55 
75 
00 

.29 

.25 
.20 

.16 
.17 
.20 

.23 
.08 
.16 

.20^ 

.17 

.15 

.12H 

.13 

.15 

.13 

.16 

.12'^ 



SOMEBODY BUYS 

COPPER STOCK 

Order for Only 300 Shares 

Causes Flurry in 

Market. 

The only flurry in tlie copper mar- 
ket this morning v.-as In Chlno stock. 
A buying- order for 300 shares of this 
stock In New York this morning 
caused It to advance until at the close 
it had gone to $40.25. The amount of 
stock ordered was purchased at $39.12 
and $39.37. Tlie transaction was quickly 

nmi?'^'*A** ^Y ot'^^^rs of a smaller vol- 
ume. Amalfc'amated advanced today 

r'eachi'i $V9..f. ^- ^"^ -^'^'•^'^ ^"^^e 



$10 



of 



changed 



Copper 
capital, 
par $5 
forma- 

shares, 
to the 



originally 
Consolidated 



.15 

.20 

.21 
.17 
.22 
.20 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



2 pr.Tlrlc, per ton. . . 

1 Midland, per ton. 

2 Midland, per ton. 

Rye stray, per ton 

Oats, per ton 



6.00® 
4.50® 
6.00® 
4.50® 



7.00 
5.00 
5.50 
5.00 



HO%illO%illO% 110% 
11«%|110%|110% 



1S% 
162 

18% 

3^4 
63 

98 1^ 
111 

24 V2 

108 1^ 

F.I 17^ 

. ..il05 

. .1152 3s 

' 60% 



17%| 18>^ 
160»^|161% 



17% 
3114 
62% 

96^4 
110 

2 41/4 
107% 

105 

149%J15] 
59% I 601/ 



18% 

31 '4 
62*4 

971/4 
111 

24% 
108% 

17% 
105 



18 
160 i.t 
17% 
30 

62^4 

96 %» 

110% 

ioive 

14 
'50 ' ■ 



%!i 

... -. % 59 „ 
105%1105% 105% IO5S4 



51% 
28 

62% 
92 V4 



50 
27 
62 
92 



r.0% 

26 1^ 
62 



• ••■••< 



51 
28 

62% 
921/4 

Shares. 
... 68.69 4 
... 99,529 
.. .167,179 
. . .255,62.'! 
. . .308,400 



Ke'^v York. 

New York. May £2. — BuUir— Receipts, 11.042 tubs; 
ujisettletl; ci-eauiery extras, 28'4(«28H<'; flrst.s, 274 
(n28c; seconds, 26fe27c; state dairy finest. 27 H^ 28c; 
good to prime, 26',t(a27c; common to fair, 25®2Cc; 
PR'Cess extras. 27':!c; firsts, 26^s(tf27c; factoo' sec- 
onds, 24Vsf; packing stock. No. 2, 22 ^@ 23c; No. 3, 
21 (n 22c. 

Clieese — Firm; recel;its. 3,343 boxes; state whole 
milk, fresh colored si>ecials, 13%(oia^c; do. white 
and pale specials. 13»4c: do, colored, average, fancy. 
i;s'4c; do, white snd pale average, fancy, 13H@ 
Kf'tic; do, fresh under grades, 12(<i 13c; state whole 
milk, held as to style and quality, 14® 17c; Wiscon- 
sin whole milk twins, held, 15(il6%c. 

f^Bs — Steady; receipts. 35.992 cases; fresh gathered 
exira.M, 22 V4 (a 23c; fresh cathered storage packed, firsts 
to extra firsts, 21(S22c; fresh gathered, regular packed, 
extra fir^Is. 21fe21i*ic: do, firsts, 20w20Hc; fre«h 
gathered, f-econds, lliit'll'^c; do, thirds, 17^18'/4c; 
fresh gathered, dirties. No. 1, iSfelSHc; do. No. 2. 
ircalT'.vc; fresh gaUiereil checks, good to choice, dry, 
l(;^17c; do, checks, under grades, per ca.se, $3.00@ 
4.50; state, PennEylvanla and nearby hennery, whiles, 
as to size and quality, 22(a25c; state. Pennsylvania 
and nearby, gathered, whites aa to size and (luality, 
21(s24c; western whites, 20(S23c; stale, Peiuisylvania 
i;nd nearby browns, 22(n23c; di<, galhcrtd, browns 
and mixed colors, 20(3 22c. 



• • • 

The following dispatch concerning 
the consolidation of the new Ciiiouf 
and other copper companies, was le- 
celved today from Boston by Gay & 
bturgrls: ■* * 

■The initial move looking to a con- 
solidation of the GIrou.x and adjoinfns 

taken by the incorporation under Dela- 
ware laws of the Consolidated 
Mines company, with $8,t;00 000 
divided into 1,600.000 shares 
(original plans looking to the 
tlon of a ccynpany with 400.000 
par $20. having been 
aforesaid). 

"The incorporators are Joseph W 
^n^"n''^^'?^ 'f secretary of most of the 
R "^.Vr"^ Cole-Ryan properties; Joseph 
rir£?i^°" °^ Duluth. a director in t ? 
Mroux company, and Edward S. CJrev 

iTis j^^^mi'''' ^"'^^ -^^^^^ Phif: 

iips, Jr., and is the man who 
developed the Nevada 
properties in Ely. 

havi if ""^*'stood that some changes 
have been made In the preliniinarv 
plans for the merger of the Giroux 
Copper Mines. Butte & Elv, and Chahf- 
man companies of the Ely camp 'ntese 
relate chielly to the basis of exchan|? 
of Girou.x stock for shares In the new 
"H^?v"'h% ^'^^ original intention wa^ 
to give but one share of new stock for 
ten Giroux, but the stockholders 
latter company will fare better 
tered plans become effective 

••Both President T. F. Cole and Vice 
President J. B. Cotton have been iS 

on7 ^y.V^I?''^^^ P^^l "^°"^i^ working 
IV J^%y.^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ consolidation. 
\v . B. Ihompscn. two of whose com- 
panies will be taken over, would 
admit that negotiations were In 
ress. 

"Goroux controls three-tenths of th© 
Steptoe Creek, while Copper Mines 
company owns the other seven-tenths, 
t"m,M fh P"/^'hase of Copper Mines 
v^ould therefore assure the 
tlon of a water supply. 

"The compelling reason 
merger apparently Is that 
"^ake possible a financial 
Which a concentrating and 
plant could be built, thereby 
ing the necessity of sending 
for custom treatment. The 
that Giroux has with the Steptoe 
smelter of Nevada Consolidated 
It Is understood, be cancelled 
year's notice by either party. 



of 
if 



the 
al- 



not 
prog- 



consolida- 

for the 
It would 

plan by 

smelting 
eliminat- 
or e away 

contract 



may, 
upon one 



• • 

Duluth curb stock 

day were as follows 

Stocks — 
.American Sajrinaw . 
Butte-Alex Scott . . . , 

Cactus 

& 
& 
& 



quotations for to- 



Montana. 
Corbln . . . 
Sonora. . . 



9,771 



ro(S 



Chicairo. 

Chicag'i, May 22. — Butter— Lower; receipts, 
tubs; creamery extras, 27 He; extra firsts, 27c. 

Kggs— I'lK hungid ; receipts, 16,117 cases. 

Potaliics — Hight-r; rixeipt?, 33 cars; .Michigan, 
75o; MlnnejMta. fi.'".('i 70c; Wlscunsiu, 67(a75. 

Poultry— Unciiangcd. 

HIDES, LEATHER, FURS. 



Calumet 
Calumet 
Calumet 
Carman . 

Chief Cons . . .' 

Cliff Mining 

Copper Queen 

Denn-Arizona 

Duluth Moctezuma ... 

Florence 

Keating 

Elenlta \ 

Mowltza 

Rainbow Development! 

Red Warrior 

San Antonio 

Savanna 

St. Mary 

Sierra 

Summit Copper 

Warren 

Warrior Development. 



Bid. 

9.75 

8.12 

.06 



.40 

1.25 

.80 

6.50 



1.12 



.60 

.05 

6.00 

.80 



Asked. 
$ 10.00 
8.37 
.07 
.05 
.05 
2.00 
.45 
1.37 
.S2 
.08 
75 
.00 
.65 
.25 
.25 
,30 
.00 
.00 
.50 
,60 
.OS 
.70 
07 
7.00 
.90 



6. 
1, 

1 
1. 

S. 
1. 
2. 
1. 



ORKKN SALTKn 
Market still yer)' 



HIDES— 
weak. Tanners 



New 

steady, 

2"fe per cent; 

offered at 2% 



New Yor'lt Money. 

York. May 12. — Money 



on call, 
ruling rate, 
closing bid, 2% per cent; 
per cent. Time loans, ir- 



234 @ 3 per cent; 



inch 
prevailing 



MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 



Wheat Prices Rise on Southwestern 
and Canadian Crop News. 

Chicngo. May 22. — With Southwest- 
• rn crop reports Indicating deteriora- 
tion and with the Canadian crop 
backward wheat prices today made 
an additional upturn. Fair selling. 
hf>wever. at the advance brought about 
a gradual reaction. Showers in Kansa.s 
were of assistance to the bears. The 
opening was Uc lower to ^(av^c up. 
.July started at 90'^c to 90 '^^c. varying 
from %c off to a like amount up, rose 
to 90 14©' 90 %c and then declined to 

!■o'^c. 

Statements that the Kansas prospect 



Wheat Turns Lower After Firmness 
in Early Session. 

May 22.— After 



regular; sixty-days, 3% per cent, and 
ninety days. 3^4(&4 per cent; six 
months. i\ per cent. 

Close: Prime mercantile paper, 5@ 
5*/^ per cent; sterling exchange easier, 
with actual business in bankers' bills 
at $4. S3. 10 for sixtj -day bills, and at 
$l.K6..'iO for demand. Commercial bill"?, 
$4.S2M;. Par silver. 60c. Mexican dol- 
lars. 4Sc. Government bonds, irregular. 
Railroad bonds, firm. 



New 

steady 
Vance 
to 8 
early 
and a 
.steady 
sive 
the 



Co<fon Market. 

York. May 22. — Cotton opened 

at unchanged prices to an ad- 

of ^ points, and sold about 4 

points net higher during the 

trading on continued covering 

scattering demand. Re-latively 

cables, apprehension of exces- 

rainfall in the western belt, and 

failure of the market to weaken 



G. S. steers, over 60 Ibe | 

G. S. cows. 2.^ lbs and up, »nd steers 

under CO lbs 

G. .S. cows, 40 lbs and up. 



not Interested. 
No. 1. No. 2. 



Minn., 

wheat declined a trifie. 
lower than yesterday, 
and September %c 
displayed strong 
crop reports from 



SHIP TO THE OLD RELIABLE 

C. C. WYMAN & CO. 



DULUTH 



GRAIN COMMISSION 



MINNEAPOLIS 



Minneapolis, 
early firmness, 
May closed '4 
July %c lower 
lower. The market 
undertone on bullish 

the Southwest. Local elevator stocks 
decreased 800,000 bu for five days 

May opened 89 3sc: high. S9\c: 'low 
SS-v^c; close. 88 ^^c. July opened 90Vi(R' 
90Vic; high. 90%c; low. sga^c; close 
89 %c. September opened 91c- hlKh' 
91 %c; low. 90a4c: close 90 %c ' 

Cash wheat firm; 'No. 1 northern, 
l^/^<<i?c above July prices. 

Millstuffs — Shipments. 1,472 tons De- 
mand good; offerings light and prices 
unchanged. 

Closing cash: No. 1 hard 
No. 1 northern. 90%@9234c; to 
90%^90%c: choice to arrive. 
No. 2 northern. 88% (?7 90->sc; 
hard Montana. 91T4c; No. 3 wheat, 86"% 
@8S%c; No. 3 yellow corn, 61c; No 3 
white oats, 35%@36c; No. 2 rye, 55 (fi! 
57%c. ^ 

Flax — Receipts, 24 cars; year ago 
22; shipments, 4. Demand good. Closing 
price. $1.31%. '^ 

Bailey — Receipts. 42 cars; year 
3; shipments, 22. Barley strong 
.'steady; demand excellent. Prices 
changed. 

Flour — Mills reported 
provement in flour sales 



on the breaking of the eastern belt 
drouth ai>peared to account for part of 
the. buying and as prices worked above 
the high level of yesterday a few stop 
order."? were uncovered. 

Spot closed quiet; middling uplands 
12.10; middling gulf. 12.35. Sales, none! 

Futures doped firm; closing bids: 
.May. 11.69; June, 11.74; Julv, ll.»^l; Au- 
gust, 11.59: September, 11.31: October, 
11.24; November, 11.25; December, 11 25- 
January, 12.21; March, 11.29. 



branded 
" ibB.'.' 



92%c; 
arrive, 

No. 2 



ago. 
and 
un- 



a slight im- 
today. Prices 



Greene Cananea Copper Company. 

To the Stockholders: 

Notice Is hereby driven that the An- 
nual Meeting of the stockholders of 
Greene Cananea Copper Company will 
be held at the office of the Company 
at Room 1400 In the Alworth Build- 
ing in Duluth, Minnesota, on Mondav, 
the 16th day of June, A. D. 1913, at 12 
o'clock noon, for the election of three 
directors to hold office for three years, 
for considering and acting upon a 
proposition, earnestl.,- recommended bv 
the officers and Directors of the Com- 
pany, to change the number and the 
par value of the shares of the cap- 
ital stock of the CoTipany so that it? 
authorized capital shall consist of six 
hundred thousand shares of the par 
value of one hundred dollars each (in- 
stead of three million shares of twen- 
ty dollars each as at present), and, 
if then and there apf roved and author- 
ized by resolution and vote of the 
.stockholders as provided by law, to, 
amend the Certlficatj of Incorporation 1 
of the Company accordingly, and for 
the transaction of such other business 
as may properly come before said 
meeting. The stock transfer books 
will be closed from .lune 2nd, 1913 to 
June 16th, 1913. both Inclusive. 

Dated Duluth, Minnesota, May 21th 
1913. 

FREDERIC R. KENNEDY, 

Secretary. 



rhlcagro Uventock. 

rhiraco. May 22. — Hoks— Hecelpts, 21.000 head; 
generally steady at yesterday's average; hulk ot isles' 
$8.,^5(.iS.70; light. $8..'i0Cttii.".^; mixed, |8.40(n8 r2'2 '• 
heavy, $8.1.')(is8.fi,'i: rough. $8.15ftj8.3o; pigs. $6.60C«' 
8.40. 

Cattle — Receipts. 4.000 head; steady: beeves, |*.lo 
fjR.8.'): Texas steers, $6.r.'.(" 7.70; western steers, $7.00 
(iS.S';; stockers and feeders, $.".80(i< 8.00; cowg and 
heifers, $;<.80('i7.f<0; calves, $7.00(n «».7.5. 

Sheep — Receipts. 17.000 head; steady 
lower: native. $3,40((jfi.]0; western, 
yearlings, $6.00(a0.65; lambs, native, 
western, $6.00(3 7.65. 



to a shade 
|.5.50('<B.10; 
$6.00@7.C5; 



flat 

G. S. long haired kips. 8 to 25 

G. S. veal Wp. 8 to 25 lbs 

G. S. veal kip. 8 to 15 lbs 

G. 8. deacon skins, under 8 Ihe 

G. .'^. horse hides 

DKY IlIDKS— 

Weak in .sympatliy with green salted. 

Hrj- western, over 12 lbs 

Dry Minnesota. Dakota, Wisconsin 

and Iowa hides, ever 12 lbs 

Dry kip. 5 to 12 lbs 

Dry calf, under 5 U>s ail soctlons..,. 
TALLOW AND GREASE— 
Market steady. 

Tallow in cakes 

Tallow In barrels 

Grease, white 

Grpa.se, yellow and brown 

Hhip in tight 2-headed barrels to 

SHEEP I'ELTS— 

Market dull In sympathy with wooL 

G. S. pelts, large 

G. .S. pelts, small to medium 

G. S. shearlings 

Dry butcher pelts, lb 

Dry murrains, lb 



.I2H 
.12H 

.lOH 
.13 
.13% 
.18 
.85 
4.00 

No. 1. 
.22 

.19 
.21 
.23 

No. 1. 

.06>4 
.05^4 

.or. 

04 H 



< .IIH 



.ll^ 
.12*i 

.14H 
.63 
1.30 

No. 2. 
.20 

.17 
.19 
.21 

No. 2. 

om 

.04H 



avoid leakage. 



OSH 



.50 
.30 
.10 
.10 
.09 



1.00 
.50 
.23 
.11 
.10 
Per l.b— 



THE PRODUCE MARKET. 



• RTRAWnEnniES— 

Fancy, .Arkansas, qla.. rase 

KIX)UIDA PINEAPPLES— 

Pineapples. 24'8-.'?6'8, case 

FU>RII>A GRAPE FRllT— 

Size 54-64, box 

8!m 46. box 

Size 36. box 

CALIFOllNIA ORANGES— Navels. 

Size ««. bo.x $5.00 

81ze 126-216. box 5.75 

Size 250, box 5.25 

8ize 288, box 5.00 

LEMONS— 

.^ancy Tallfornla. any «lre, box 

ancy McBalnt lemons, bcx 

Limes, box 

BANANAS— 

Bananas, lb 

APPLES— 

Fancy, Ben Davlet. bbl ^ ijq 

BOX APPLES— Choice. Extra Faiicy 

Wlneaap* |2,oo 

Arkansas Black $1.25 i.gQ 

|8pitzenh«rg!i J. 40 i.jj 
Jon»thoii9 1.2S 



$2.50 

3.50 

5.00 

4.25 

3.75 

Med. Sweets. 

$4.25 

5.25 

4.,';0 

4.50 

8.00 

T.SO 

1.40 

04H 



LEATTTRH*- No. 1. 

Texas oak sole A 44 

Hemlock slaughter sole xx 37 

Hemlock drv hide sole 35 

Hemlock harness leather 44 

t ak liarnes-s leather 45 

FURS— Large. Medium. Small 

Skunk, bl.-.ck $2.50 $2.00 

Sk-imk. broad stripe 1.75 1.2.T 

Skunk, long narrow stripe 2.2.'5 1.75 

.Muskrat. winter 36 .32 

Haccoon 2.50 2.00 

Mink, dark and brown 5.00 3. .50 

.Mink, pale 4.25 3.00 

Reaver 11.00 7.60 

Cat. wild 4.00 2.50 

Fisher, dark 25.00 20.00 

Fisher, pale 15.00 10.no 

Fox, red 5.00 3.00 

Fox, dark cross 25.00 18.00 

Fox. silver dark 800.00 4.%0.00 

Fox. silver pale 300 00 200 00 

Wolverines 10.00 7.50 

Otter, dark 25.00 20.fO 

Otter, pale 12.00 i.OO 

Lynx 20.00 15.00 

Marten, dark brown and pale 25.00 12.50 

Weasel, white TO .00 

Weasel, stained, damaged 20 .16 

Wolf, timber 2.50 150 

Bear, as to size 3.00 @ 35. 00 



No. 2. 
.42 
.36 
.33 
.42 
.43 



11.75 

1.00 

1.50 

.25 

1.75 

' 2 00 

l.tO 

4.00 

1.50 

15.00 

6..^o 

2.00 

12.00 

330.00 

150.00 

6.00 

15.00 

4.00 

10.00 

6.00 

.40 

.10 

1.00 



MinnrNu<a PuRtnumtem. 

Wa.shlngton, May 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The president today 
sent the following nominations of Alln- 
nesota postmasters to the senate: Mar- 
tin Chrlstenson. Pariium: C. E. Jude, 
Maple Lake; Paul D. Mitchell, Brooten; 



"S.O. SOURER. 

Wireless Calls for Help Will Be Heard 
in the Future. 

London Chronicle: Raymond Phillipa, 
the inventor of the system of steering 
airships by wlrele.^s telegraphy, gavo 
at St. George's hall recently a dem- 
onstration of a new invention which 
It Is asserted, will give life at sea a 
far greater Immunity from danger 

^\ hen the Titanic was lost hist year. 
It may be remembered, despite the 
presence of another vessel within a 
radius of half a dozen miles, its wire- 
less signals were unheeded becau.s^- no 
wireless operator was on duty. Mr 
i hilUps has, it Is asserted pi-oduccd 
an Instrument which distributes a dan- 
ger signal capable of cutting out com- 
pletely all wireless messages passim? 
oyer a circle of fifty or 100 mll-s ra- 
alus. No matter what svstem a ve^-sel 
may be using the danger signal claint 
« preference and enfon es itself un.,iV 
the notice of thos.- In the receiving 
ship. Should there be no one on duty 
In the operating room a svren is made 
to operate, arousing the officers .md 
wireless experts to the fact that a 
neighboring ship Is In need of assist- 
ance. 

Mr. Phllllp.s had his transmitting .ota- 
tlona upon the hall stage. while a 
member of the audience sent wirehss 
signals to a movable receiving '.sta- 
tion" in the auditorium, the due re::el-it 
of the message being notified bv the 
ringing of a bell. Mr. Phillips " from 
another station, supposed to repr-scnt 
a stricken vessel, sent out a cojitin- 
uous wave, which abruptly stopped the 
bell and substituted the tones of a 
powerful syren, at the same time caii«;- 
Ing two illuminated wheels to revolve. 

* . 

Six black foxes, worth about $15 000 
were captured In Hancock. Me., near 
.Mctarlands hill, recently. The capture 
is one of the richest ever made in 
Maine and breaks the record for re- 
cent years 



0. A. HOFFMAN 

108 PALLADIO BL.DG. 

STOCKS AND BONDS 



UNUSTEO SKCURITICt. 
OorreapondeBre Inrlted 



• • * 

The regular Quarterly dividend of 
a share on Calumet & Hecla stock 
rayable June 20 to stockhorderg ' 

ord May 23, was declai ed today 
dividend Is of the same amount as 
la.'^t one. 



rec- 

The 

the 



•■I. 



1 



► r 



I 



I 






Thursday, 



THE DUIUTH HERALD 



May 82, 1913. 



It 



UFb-IC'lAL FROCl!:i!:UINUS. 



Council ChainbPr, 
Duluth. Minn.. May 15. 1913. 
Resrular meeting. 
Roll call: 

Present — Commlsaionera Illcken, 
Merritt. Murchlson, Voaa, Mayor 
Prince — 5. 

Absent — None. 



PRESKXTATION OF PETTTIOXS AND 
OTHER COMMLTNICATIONS. 

Le.ster Park Improvement club sub- 
mlttltia: copy of resolution adopted by 
•aid club relative to dumplnjf -ground. 
—Commissioner of public safety. 

Anton Patter et al for the construc- 
tion of a sanitary sewer In Tenth alley 
from Twelfth to Thirteenth avenues 
«ast. — Commissioner of public works. 

Appllcatl<->n9 for license to sell milk. 

Applications for license to sell ciga- 
rettes. 

Application of Duluth Union I^bor 
Pavilion association for dance hall 
license at Falrmount park. 

Application and bond of George W. 
Palm»r for license to conduct a plumb- 
ing shop at No. lo9^ Ea.st First street. 

Applications and bonds for license to 
•ell Intoxlcatiriij llQuors as follows: 

Oscar Llndqiiiat at No. 1921 West Su- 
perior -street, John P. Bror»t at No. G13 
Wfst Superior street, being a transfer 
from Hans Johnson at the same loca- 
tion. 

Moses S. Cook at No. 212 West Su- 
perior street. — Commissioner of public 
safety 

Bills aaralnst the public utility and 
public works funda. — Commissioner of 
finance. 



UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 
By Commissioner Murchl8on: 

Resolved, that the contract for pav- 
ing of Twenty-third avenue west from 
Michigan street to Tenth street be ana 
hereby la awarded to E. A. Dahl on his 
bid for paving said avenue with brick 
from Michigan street to Third street, 
sandstone blocks from Third to Fourth 
■trccts and crushed rock from Fourth 
street to Tenth street 

Commissioner Murchison moved the 
adoption of the resolution and recom- 
mended that tlie same be amended by 
atrlking out all that part of the reso- 
lution after the words "sandstone 
blocks" and by Inserting In lieu thereof 
the following: "from Third street to 
Fi.-'th street and crushed rock from 
FUth street to Tenth street" and moved 
the adoi>tlon of the amendment. 

The amendment wa.s declared adopt- 
ed upon the following vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt. Murchison. Voss, Mayor Prince — 6. 

Nays — None. 

The question being upon the adop- 
tion of the resolution as amended It 
was declared adopted upon the follow- 
ing vote: 

Yeas^-Commlssioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt. Murchison. Voss, ilayor Prlnco — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 15. 1918. 

Approved May 13. 1913. 

By Commissioner Murchison; 

Resolved, that the bid of the Duluth 
Lumber company for furnishing lum- 
ber for maintenance purposes for the 
season 1913 be and hereby Is accepted 
and li Is hereby directed that the con- 
tract for furnishing said lumber be 
awarded to the Duluth Lumber com- 
pany. 

Commissioner Murchison moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken^ Mer- 
rttt. Murchison. Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Pa.-^sed May 15. 1913. 

Approved May 16, 1913. 



By Commissioner Murchison: 

Resolved. That the bid of the 
Standard Oil company for fuml.shing 
road oil for sprinkling for the season 
1913 be and hereby Is accepted and It 
Is hereby directed that the contract 
for furnishing said oil be awarded to 
the Standard Oil company. 

Commisslone:- Murchison moved the 
adoption of the resolution and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vole: 

Yea-s — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt. Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed— May 15, 1913. 

Approved — May 16. 1913. 



INTRODUCTION AND CONSIDERA- 
TION OF ORDINANCES. 

The following entitled ordinances 
took their first reading: 
By Mayor Prince: 

An ordinance compelling the pres- 
ence at council meeting of absent 
members by a minority. 
By Commissioner Murchison: 

An ordinance to appropriate from 
the permanent Improvement fund the 
•urn of $350 for replacing with tile 
•ewer the wooden sewer In Railroad 
street from L,ake avenue to the outlet 
In First avenue west slip. 
By Commls-sloner Voss: 

An ordinance to amend an ordinance 
entitled "An ordinance to regulate the 
business of hawking. peddling and 
canvassing within the limits of the 
city of Duluth" passed April 12, 1909 
as amended. 



The following entitled ordinances 
took their second reading. 
By Commls-^loner Hicken: 

An ordinance to license and reerulate 
public dance halls and public skating 
rinks and to prohibit immodest dan- 
cing and other disorderly conduct 
therein. 
By Commissioner Hlcken: 

An ordinance to appropriate from 
the public safety fund the sum of 
J^.OuO to be used for the purchase of 
coal for the ftre department of the 
city of Duluth. 
By Commissioner Hicken: 

An ordinance to regulate the run- 
rtng at large of dogs In the city of 
Duluth. 
By Commissioner Hlcken: 

An ordinance to require owners of 
moving vans, furniture vans, transfer 
■wagons, express wagons or delivery 
wagons to register and report to the 
chief of police dally, names of per- 
sons, dates of moving and places to 
which andi from which such persons 
removed In the city of Duluth. 

The ordinance by Commissioner 
Hlcken entitled "An ordinance pro- 
hibiting the use of cigarettes by min- 
ors and prohibiting the supply of 
clgarfttes and cigarette paper to min- 
ors and regulating and providing for 
license for the manufacture, sale, bar- 
ter, exchange or giving away of cigar- 
ettes, cigarette paper and cigarette 
tobacco and making the violation 
thereof criminal offense and providing 
for penalties for such violation," took 
Its third reading. 

Commissioner Hlcken moved the 
adoption of the ordinance and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
rltt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

The ordinance by Commissioner Mer- 
rltt entitled "An ordinance to appro- 
priate from the public utility fund the 
sum of $225 for printing annual report 
of the water and light department for 
the year 1912," took Its third reading. 

Comml-ssloner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the ordinance and it was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
rltt. Murohl-xon. Voss. Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

The ordinance by Commissioner Mer- 
Tltt entitled "An ordinance to appro- 
priate from the public utility fund the 
sum of $«;,000 for hauling pipe for the 
water and light department for the 
season 1913," took Its third reading. 

Commissioner Merrltt moved the 
adoption of the ordinance and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

The ordinance by Commissioner 
Hlcken entitled ">vn ordinance to 
amend an ordinance entitled 'An ordi- 
nance to appropriate from the perma- 
nent improvement fund the sum of 
$500 to be used during the year 1913 
for the purpose of paying for labor 
and material for placing underground 
of wires owned by the city of Du- 
luth' parsed April 7, 1913," took lU 
' third reading. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 



tion of the ordinance and It was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote; 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt, Murchison. Voss. Major Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 



The ordinance by Comml.saloner Voss 
entitled "An ordinance to appropriate 
from the general fund the sum of 
11,235.00 for printing annual reports of 
city officers and departments." took 
Its third reading. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the ordinance and It was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Comml.ssioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

The ordinance by Commissioner 
Murchison entitled "An ordinance to 
appropriate from the permanent Im- 
provement fund the sum of $2,500 to 
provide funds for furnishing material 
for paving the intersections of Twelfth 
avenue west and Michigan street and 
Twenty-rtrst avenue west and Superior 
street and for extension of the sewer 
in Michigan street from approximately 
the center of the Intersection ot 
Twelfth aveaue west and Michigan 
street to the west line of said inter- 
section." took its third reading. 

Commissioner Murchison moved the 
adoption of the ordinance and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
rltt Murcliison. Voss, Mayor Prince — i. 

Nays — None. 

MOTIONS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Mayor Prince submitted the follow- 
ing resolution: 

Resolved. That the following be, and 
the same is hereby made, the dis- 
tribution of a<lnuni3trativa duties 
among the divisions of the goveru- 
mtiit of the city of Duluth: 

Section 1. To the division of public 
affairs there Is hereby assigned the 
duties appertaining to the manage- 
ment, supervision, control, direction 
and regulation of public buildings and 
the property appertaining to such 
buildings except those buildings and 
property particularly used in connec- 
tion with the business hereby dis- 
tributed and assigned to some other 
division or divisions; of parks and 
playgrounds; of public markets; of 
public libraries; of public charities 
and corrections; of the inspection of 
weights and measures; of the Inspec- 
tion of buildings and the enforcement 
of the housing ordinances; of the In- 
spection of elevators; of the inspection 
of water and electric meters; of the 
Inspection of public wiring; of the 
public welfare; of the regulation of 
public service corporations operating 
steam, electrio or gasoline railroatis, 
or telephone or telegraph lines con- 
necting the city of Duluth with otlier 
municipalities; and of all other public 
business not otherwise distributed by 
this ordinance; provided, however, that 
nothing In this section contained shall 
be taken to deprive the commissioner 
in charge of the division of public 
safety of those duties and powers nec- 
essarily Incident to the powers and 
duties assigned to the division of 
public safety by section 4 hereof. 

Sec. 2, To the division of finance 
there Is hereby assigned all those 
duties appertaining to the manage- 
ment, supervision, control and direction 
of the offices and departments of the 
treasurer, the auditor, and the assessor 
of the city of Duluth. and of the public 
finances. 

Sec. 3. To the division of public 
works there Is hereby assigned all 
those duties appertaining to the man- 
agement, supervision, control, direc- 
tion, maintenance. Improvement, re- 
pair and cleaning of streets, alleys, 
avenues, highways, wharves, docks, 
culverts. sewers, tunnels, subways, 
public grounds except parks, water 
courses; bridges, except the Aerial 
bridge, and other public improvements, 
except those improvements assigned 
by this resolution to other divisions; 
provided, however, that nothing In this 
section shall be held to limit or abridge 
the duties and powers assigned, to the 
division of public safety by section 4 
hereof. 

Sec. 4. To the division of public 
safety there is hereby assigned the 
duties appertaining to the manage- 
ment, supervision, control and direc- 
tion of the police department, the 
health department, and the fire de- 
partment, and of the properties used 
by said departments; the Inspection of 
milk; the inspection of plumbing; the 
sanitation, policing and protecting of 
the city from violations of the law; 
and the relation of the city to other 
municipalities In matters relating to 
public safety. 

Sec. 5. To the division of public 
utilities there Is hereby assigned all 
those duties appertaining to the man- 
agement, supervision, control and di- 
rection of any public utilities now 
owned or that may hereafter be ac- 
quired by the city and used or to be 
used for the purpose of supplying any 
commodity or furnishing any service 
to the people of the city, together with 
all the property, plants and equipment 
and Instrumentalities connected with 
such utilities, and used in any such 
business; and of the Aerial bridge; and 
of the lighting of the streets; and the 
establishment and maintenance of 
drinking troughs and fountains, of all 
kinds. 

Mayor Prince moved the adoption of 
the resolution and It was adopted on 
the following vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken, Mer- 
rltt. Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 15, 1913. 

Approved May 16, 1913. 

By Mayor Prince: 

Resolved, That the following be the 
rules for the conduct and administra- 
tion of business of the city of Duluth: 

Rule 1. The administration of the 
affairs of each division of the govern- 
ment of the city of Duluth shall be 
regulated by the commissioner In 
charge of that division, except as other- 
wise provided by the charter of the 
city of Duluth, or by ordinance or 
resolutions or rules or regulations 
adopted by the council. 

Rule 2. The duties of the officers 
and employes of the city of Duluth, 
except as otherwise regulated by the 
charter of the city of Duluth, or by 
ordinances, resolutions, rules or regu- 
lations adopted by the council or by 
the commissioner In charge of the il- 
vl34on In which such officer or em- 
ploye Is engaged, shall be those duties 
necessary and proper to the respective 
offices or employments held by such 
officers or employes. 

Rule 3. Whenever the council shall 
require an officer or employe to per- 
form duties in more than one division, 
such officer or employe shall be gov- 
erned by such rules and regulations as 
may be made by the commissioner In 
charge of each division in which such 
officer or employe is required to per- 
form duties, or such rules and regula- 
tions as may be made jointly by the 
comnils.srioner9 at the head of the dl- 
vi.sions In which such officer or employe 
Is required to perform duties, unless 
the council shall otherwise prescribe 
the powers and duties of such officer 
or employe. 

Rule 4. The commissioner In charge 
of one division may, at the request of 
the commissioner In charge of any oth- 
or division, direct an officer or em- 
ploye of the one division to perform 
duties In such other division — which 
duties shall be performed subject to the 
rules and regulations made by the 
commissioner In charge of such other 
division, or by rules and regulations 
made by the two said commissioners 
Jointly. 

Rule 5. Except as otherwise provided 
by the charter or by this council, the 
manner, times and forms In which each 
division, sub-division and department 
and the officers of each divLsion, sub- 
division and department shall handle 
and adjust accounts with the division 
of finance shall be regulated by the 
commissioner In charge of the division 
of finance. 

Rule 6. The Inspector of plumbing 
of the city of Duluth Is hereby di- 
rected and required to perform such 
dutU'S In connection with the office 
of the assessor of the city of Duluth 
as ho may be directed to perform by 
the commissioner In charge of the di- 
vision of finance, and to perform such 
duties In connection with the division 
of public works as he rnay be directed 
to perform by the commissioner In 
charge of the division of public works; 



subject, however, to the provision* of 
rule 3. . ^ M 

Rule 7. The building Inspector of 
the city of Duluth is hereby required 
to perform such duties in connection 
with the office of the assessor of the 
city of Duluth as he may be required 
to perform by the commissioner in 
charge of the division of finance; sub- 
ject, however to the provisions of 

rule 3. . .. # 

Mayor Prince moved the adoption of 
the resolution and It was adopted on 
the following vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
rltt. Murchison, Voss. Mayor Prince — ft. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 15, 1913. 

Approved May 16, 191S. 

Bv Commissioner Voss: 

ResoU-ed, That the time for the pay- 
ment of the assessment for the fol- 
lowing improvements be and hereby is 
extended for a period of fifteen days 
without penalty. ^ , 

Paving of Sixth avenue west under 
contract No. 1292. 

Paving of Second avenue east un- 
der contract No. 1291. 

Paving of Twenty-first avenue west 
under contract No. 1300. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the rc-.'^olution and It was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: , -, 

Yeas— Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
rltt. Murchison, Voss. Mayor Prtoce— 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed Mav 15, 1913. 

Approved May 16, 1913. 

Bv Commissioner Voss: 

"Resolved. That bills are hereby al- 
lowed and it is hereby directed that 
orders be drawn on the city treasurer 
to pay the same as follows: 

PUBLIC UTILITY FUND. 

Great Northern Power company. 
$1,474.25: Zenith Furnace company, 

'^'^'^'^ PUBLIC WELFARE FUND. 

H H. Phelps), $250.00. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution and It was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: , -- 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt. Murchison. Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 13, 1913. 

Approved May 16, 1913. 

Bv Commissioner Voss: 

"Resolved That the city treasurer Is 
hercbv directed to receive from the 
owner of lot 95, East Sixth street, Du- 
luth proper. First division. Including 
lot 8 block 6, Norton's division, the 
amount of the original assessment 
levied against said lot for grading 
Sixth avenue east and from the East 
Duluth company the amount of the or- 
iginal assessment levied against their 
property for sprinkling of London road 
during "the season 1911, and from the 
owner of lots 3 and 4. block 70, and 
that part of lots 5 and 6, block 70, 
lying north of Superior street, all In 
London addition, the amount of the 
original assessment levied against said 
lots for the construction of a sanitary 
.sewer In Pitt street provided in each 
case the same Is paid within ten days 
from the date of the passage of this 
resolution and further provided that 
each of the owners above mentioned 
shall pay the sum of $1.50, one-third 
the estimated cost of the publication 
of this resolution. 

Resolved further. That upon such 
payment being made by the East Du- 
luth company, the auditor Is directed 
to certify such fact to the county au- 
ditor. ^ ^. . 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution and It was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken. Mer- 
rltt. Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 
Nays — None. 
Passed May 13, 1913. 
Approved May 16, 1913. 

Bv Commissioner Murchison: 

"Re.^olved, That it Is hereby directed 
that Second avenue east from First to 
Second streets be sprinkled with wa- 
ter during- the season 1913 at a net 
price of $5 per month, same to be In- 
cluded In District No. 7 and that Ninth 
avenue east from FL-st to Second 
street be sprinkled with oil and In- 
cluded in District No. 18. 

Commissioner Murchison moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: _, 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken. Mer- 
rltt. Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 15, 1913. 

Approved May 16, 1913, 

By Commissioner Murchison: 

"Resolved That the width of the 
roadway of Fifty-fourth avenue west 
from Fifth street to Elinor street be 
and hereby is established at 30 feet. 

Commissioner Murchison moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt. Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 15, 1913. 

Approved May 16, 1913. 

By Commissioner Hlcken: 

Resolved, That applications for li- 
cense to sell cigarettes are hereby 
granted as follows: ..» „. ^ , 

E P. Juntllla at No. 292 St. Croix 
avenue, W Simon & Co. at No. 106-108 
West Michigan street, H. W. Rowley 
at No. 305 West Superior street, H. W. 
Rowley at No. 312 West Superior 
street Edward A. Grochau at No. 322 
West 'First street. Ripley Cigar com- 
pany at No. 421 West Superior street, 
Eugene Fiskett at No. 507 West Mich- 
igan street, Apfel & Lade at No. 229 
West First street. 

Commissioner Hicken moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 

vote: .„, , _, 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
rltt. Murchison. Voss. Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 15, 1913. 

Approved May 16. 1913. 

By Commissioner Hicken: 

Resolved. That the application of 
George W. Palmer for license to con- 
duct a plumbing shop at No. 109 *.4 
East First street Is hereby granted 
and bond accompanying same Is here- 
by approved. 

Commissioner Hicken moved the 
adoption of the resolution, and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
rltt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 15, 1943. 

Approved May 16, 1913. 

Bv Commissioner Hlcken: 

Resolved, That it is hereby adjudged 
and determined that the following 
named applicants for license to sell 
milk are entitled to obtain such a li- 
cense for the sale or distribution of 
milk within the corporate limits of the 
city of Duluth and licenses are hereby 
granted to such applicants as follows: 

Mrs. C. Olson. L. P. Lacey. George 3. 
Bryant, C. A. Johnson, Jacob Thoreson, 
Gu.st Norman. Charlie Norman. Frank 
A. Carlson, Mrs. Agnes Hanson. Thom- 
as Borguson. Nels Johnson Andy 
Calin. Mrs. Anna Danlelson. E. Nor- 
stad Olof Mvrman. Carl Johnson. Mrs. 
A Stycker, Charles Sundln, John Thor- 
stenson, Mrs. E. J. Stone, S. E. Cornish, 
Julius Gam.st, Erik Holmberg, W. H. 
Morgen, Charles Young. Mrs. Anna 
Brandt, L. Cohen. Joe Koehl. Herman 
Krebs, Henry Lyes, W. Rudnltzky W. 
H. Rlchter. S. Salnovltz, John A. Adolf- 
son. L. A. Barnes. Mrs. E. D. Krebs, 
John Olson, Mrs. Mclver, Rudolph Ref- 
ler Herman Hendrlckson, Mrs. Charles 
Rudberg. Mrs. C. C. Sanlle, Odin Oas, 
Mrs G. L. Robblns, Mrs. J. O. Moerke. 
Walter Ogg, S. H. Pearson, G. M. Wll- 
.son. W. B. Blake, N. Mattson, J. P. 
Daly, C. R. Johnson, Harry Oliver, 
Carl Carlson^ Albert S. O'Brien, Single- 
ton Bros.. F. S. Stabenfeldt. G. B. 
Thomas Carl Claus, T. H. Johnson, 
John Uho Sebonlus^ S. Wlddis, Berg- 
told & Rvan, W. D. McLean & Sons. 
N. J. Johnson. Gottlieb Claus. W. L. 
Wlndom. Albert Erickson, Anderson 
Bros., Andrew Johnson. S. M, Kaner. 
Ole Tra-Timel, James R. Grude, Bridge- 
man & Russell, Grant E. Owen. Harry 
Gould. E. D. Drown. Forsman & Shel- 
strom. J. E. ErIckson, Otto Acker, An- 
ton Moe. Axel Sal In, Mrs. M. C. Peter- 
son. Wlckman & Oak G. Bergson, An- 
drew Anderson. M. Iturosky. John Rl- 



beness. S. Brown, C. A. Anderson, C. A. 
Johnson, O. M. Anden^n, O. Anderson, 
A. Anderson, Ad. Hniidrickson. Smith 
ft Muchart, ILaugsrud ft Markanen. P. 
J. Hickey, A. M.Marsttall Peter Dady 
8. J. Norman Llndgrsn Bros. Huttel 
Bros., Ellas Bolem, iSrnest Johnson, 
Ellas Hunhlla. C. J. Johnson Co., Oron- 
seth ft Olson, John V'sane, Alex Lar- 
son, G. M. Grant. l'*ellx De flanto 
Charlie DuUum. John Logan Co.. F. M. 
Kllgore, M. G. Neweltl, Backstrom & 
Nordqulst. Hans Krvok, C. H. Wall. 
Murray Bros., O. Tomllng, Paul Bchu- 
bltsky, Ed. Rudberg, Rustad ft John- 
son, Olson Bros.. W. H. Little. 
Henry Ratke. C. Oustafson. M. A. Al- 
rich, John MltchelU, J. Deneen, MJohele 
Antorneyt, J. H. PrlleK. L; Peterson^ C. 
Erickson P. A Sjoaellus, W. T. May- 
nard. Sellne Bros. J. G. Garstad, F. H, 
Stack, Ness L. Wlngren & Son, Mrs. 
Conklin. A. F. I^lnd Melander ft Olson, 
A. E. Arntson, J. W. licnt^ D. Klausen, 
Mrs. L. H. Mattix, Mr^. W. F. McDon- 
ald. Charles Lund.strom, Katlierine 
Petel. O.scar Christi-nson, Bergstrom 
Bros., A. H. Donald B. G. Jolin.son J. 
William Cummlng, Walter Daly, M. A. 
De Santo, Gust Hjelm, Hovlund & 
Mattson, Emll Schleiider. S. Simon, 
Iver Anderson, Frank Thlry. 

Commlnsioner Hiclien moved the 
adoption of the resolution, and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners HJcken. Mer- 
rltt Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 15 1913. 

Approved May 16. IJ 13, 

By Mayor Prince: 

Resolved. That the mayor Is hereby 
authorized to advertls*' for bids for re- 
modeling offices of the city hall, the 
cost of such work to je paid from the 
permanent Improvement fund. 

Commissioner Hlcken moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commlsslonerti Hlcken. Mer- 
rltt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 15, 1913 

Approved May 16. 1913. 

On motion of Mayor Prince the coun- 
cil adjourned. 

C. 3. PALMER, 

City Clerk. 

■ 

Council Chamber, 
Duluth. Minn., May 19, 1913. 
Regular meeting. 
Roll call. 

Present - Commls.«loners Hicken, 
Meriitt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Princo 
— 5, 

Absent — None. 



On motion of Comi lissioner Hlcken 
the minutes of the mtetlng of May 12 
were approved as published In pam- 
phlet form on a vote by acclamation. 



PRESENTATION OF J^ETlTIONS AND 
OTHER COMMUNICATIONS. 

J. A. Nelson, protest against the pro- 
vision of the dance hall ordinance pro- 
hibiting dance pavlliors within 600 feet 
of public parks. — Rectlved. 

W. C. Agnew, calling attention to the 
condition of First strest between Nine- 
teenth and Twentieth avenues east. — 
Commissioner of public works. 

Applications for :.icense to sell 
clgarettea 

Duluth Lodge No. iiOS, Loyal Order 
of Moose, application f >r license to con- 
duct a dance hall at 224 West First 
street. 

Applications for license to operate 
motor vehicles. 

Application and bond of F. H. Grlg- 
non for pooltable license at No. 51) 
East Fourth street. 

Applications and bonds for license to 
sell Intoxicating llqucrs as follows: 

Mahon ft O'Sulllvan at No. 305 West 
Superior street, being a transfer from 
Peter Spina at the same location. 

Carl Janetta at No. 1031 West Michi- 
gan street, being a transfer from 
Fred Johnson at the siame location. 

Peter Peterson at No. 1817 West Su- 
perior street. 

Sadowskl & Ptaszek at No. 2231 West 
Superior street. — Commissioner of pub- 
lic safety. 

Miscellaneous bills for the month of 
April. 

Requisitions of city pfficers and de- 
partments Nos. 3622 t3 3730. Inclusive. 

Estimates to contrictors. — -Commis- 
sioner of finance. 



REPORTS OF OFFICERS. 

Commissioner of finance, relative to 
the condition of the permanent Im- 
provement revolving :'und. — Received. 

Manager of the w^ater and light de- 
partment, submitting bids for exten- 
sions of water and gas mains. — Com- 
missioner of public uillitles. 

Commissioner of public works re- 
porting relative to the petition of 
Charles Carlson et al, In regard to the 
tar macadam mixing plant of P. Mc- 
Donnell at Twenty-th.lrd avenue east 
and the D. & I. R. ra'lway. 

Recommending construction of side- 
walks. 

Reporting bids for the construction 
of sidewalks. — Recelvfid. 

Engineer, recommending cancellation 
of sidewalk assessment against lot 7, 
block 103, West Duluth. Second di- 
vision, — Commissioner of finance. 



UNFINISHED RUSIN1ESS. 
The resolution relative to granting a 
license to N. O. Sundby to conduct a 
roller skating rink at No. 1328 East 
Sixth street was read and on motion 
of Commissioner Hlcken action on 
same was postponed f;>r one week. 

INTRODUCTION AND CONSIDERA- 
TION OF ORDINANCES. 

The following entitled ordinances 
took their first reading: 
By Commissioner Mur:!hIson: 

An ordinance to rtgulate the pro- 
cedure to be used In the vacation and 
discontinuance of streets, alleys and 
other highways In the city of Duluth. 
By Mayor Prince: 

An ordinance granting to the North- 
ern Pacific Railway company, a Wis- 
consin corporation, itfi successors, and 
assigns, the right, po^\ er and authority 
to lay, construct and maintain a rail- 
way track and facilities on and across 
certain streets, avenues, alleys and 
public grounds in thti city of Duluth 
and Imposing certain obligations on 
said company. 
By Mayor Prince: * 

An ordinance to amend an ordinance 
entitled "An ordinanc-' granting the 
Duluth Builders' Supply company, a 
Minnesota corporation, Its successors 
and assigns, the ri/irht, power and 
authority to lay. construct and main- 
tain a railway track and facilities on 
and across certain streets In the city 
of Duluth and Imposing certain ob- 
ligations on said company." passed 
Feb. 10. 1913. 
By Commissioner Merrltt: 

An ordin.ance to appioprlate from the 
public utility fund the sum of $7,000 
to be used for extension of water and 
gas mains on certaiii streets in the 
city of Duluth. 

By Commissioner Murchison: 

An ordinance to appropriate from the 
general fund the sum of $10,000 to be 
used for the construction, relaying and 
repairing of cement, tile and plank 
.sidewalks for the season 1913. 
By Commissioner HIchen: 

An ordinance regilatlng persons 
dealing in or disposing of intoxicating 
liquors In the city of Duluth. 



The following enttled ordinances 
took their second reading: 
By Mayor Prince: 

An ordinance for compelling of the 
presence at council meetings of absent 
member.s, by a minority. 
By Commissioner Mur<;hIson: 

An ordinance to appropriate from the 
permanent improvement fund the sum 
of $350 for replacing with tile sewer 
the wooden sewer In Railroad street 
from Lake avenue to the outlet In 
First avenue west slip. 
By Commissioner Voss: 

An ordinance to amt nd an ordinance 
entitled "An ordinance to regulate the 
business of hawking, peddling and can- 
vassing within the limits of the city 
of Duluth," passed A;?rll 12, 1909. as 
amended. 

The ordinance bj- Commissioner 
Hlcken entitled "An ordinance to ap- 
propriate from the public safety fund 
the sum of $8,000 to be used for the 
purchase of coal for the fire depart- 
ment of tJie city of Duluth" took its 
third reading. 

On motion of Conanilssloncr Hlck»n 



action on same was postponed for one 
week. 

The ordinance by Commissioner 
Hlcken entitled "An ordinance to re- 
quire owners of moving vans, furniture 
ears, transfer wagons, express wagons 
and delivery wagons to register and re- 
port to the chief of police dally, the 
names of persons, dates of moving. 
places from which and to which such 
persons removed within the city of Du- 
luth" took Ita third reading:. 

Commissioner Hlcken moved the 
adoption of the ordinance and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote; 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken, Mer- 
rltt, Murchison, Vosa. Mayor Prince- -5. 

Nays — None. 



The ordinance by Commissioner Mer- 
rltt entitled "An ordinance to appropri- 
ate from the public utility fund the 
sum of $225 for printing the annual 
report of the water and light ilepart- 
ment for the year 1912." took its third 
reading. 

Commissioner Merrltt moved the 
adoption of the ordinance and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
rltt, Murchison, Vo.ss. Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 



The ordinance by Commissioner 
Hlcken entitled "An ordinance to reg- 
ulate the running at large of dogs in 
the city of Dulutli" took its third 
reading. 

Commissioner Hlcken moved the 
adoption of the ordinance and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
rltt. Murchison. Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 



The ordinance by Commissioner 
Hicken entitled "An ordinance to 
license and regulate public dance halls 
and public skating rinks and to pro- 
hibit Immodest dancing and other dis- 
orderly conduct therein" took its third 
reading. 

Comniissior<ir Hlcken moved the 
adoption of the ordinance and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote; 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 



UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 
By Commissioner Murchison; 

Resolved, That contraot for the im- 
provement of Seventh street from 
Fourth avenue west to Fourteenth ave- 
nue east be and hereoy Is awarded to 
J. A. Johnson on his bid for the Im- 
provement of said street with crushed 
rock macadam. 

Commissioner Murchison moved the 
adoption of the resolution and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yea.s — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt, Murchison. Voss, Mayor Prince. — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 19, 1913. 

Approved May 21, 1913. 



By Commissioner Hlcken: 

Resolved, That It Is hereby directed 
that the following named places be 
connected with sanitary sewer, to-wlt: 

Numbers 2718, 2716, 2707, 2705, 2702 
Helm street; 2705, 2707 Railroad street; 
822, 828 East Eighth street; 214 West 
Sixth street; 1924 West Sixth street; 427 
Forty-second avenue west; 328 North 
Forty-third avenue west; 301, 301% 
North Fifty-second avenue west; 220 
North Fifty-third avenue west; 4200, 
4211 West Fourth street; 1208 West 
First street; 6302 Grand avenue; 2 
Vernon street; 3106 West Third street. 

Resolved further, That the inspect- 
or of plumbing is hereby ordered to 
give notice to the owner, agent or oc- 
cupant of said premises of the afore- 
said order in the usual form. 

Commissioner Hlcken moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince. — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 19. 1913. 

Approved May 21, 1913. 

MOTIONS AND RESOLUTIONS. 
By Commissioner Voss: 

Resolved, That the city auditor Is 
hereby directed to cancel the assess- 
ment levied against lot 7, block 103, 
West Duluth, Second division, for the 
cost of the construction of a cement 
walk on Fifty-seventh avenue west In 
the year 1911, under Contract No. 1145. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution and It was de- 
clared adopted upon the following vote: 

Yeas— Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince. — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 19, 1913. 

Approved May 21, 1913. 

Commissioner Murchison submitted 
a resolution awarding contracts for 
the construction of sidewalks for the 
season of 1913, action on which was 
postponed for one week. 

Commissioner Merrltt submitted a 
resolution awarding contract for haul- 
ing pipe for the water and light de- 
partment for the year 1913, action on 
which was postponed for one week. 

Commissioner Voss submitted a res- 
olution awarding contract for print- 
ing annual reports of city officers and 
departments to the Greer Printing 
company, action on which was post- 
poned for one week. 

Bv Commissioner Morrltt: 

Resolved, That the contract for 
printing annual report of the water and 
light department for the year 1912 be 
and hereby Is awarded to Greer Print- 
ing company. 

Commissioner Merrltt moved the 
adoption of the resolution and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commlsplonerg Hicken, Mer- 
rltt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince. — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 19, 1913. 

Approved May 21, 191J. 

Bv Commissioner Voss: 

"Whereas on May 1, 1913 the Schlltz 
Brewing company paid to the city 
treasurer the sum of $7.50 and to the 
city clerk the sum of 50c. making a to- 
tal of $8.00. for which was Issued to 
them dray licenses Nos. 4 and 210, and 

Whereas the Intention of the Schlltz 
Brewing company was to pay for 
wheelage tax upon a single and double 

vehicle, . . ^. . .. . 

Therefore, be it resolved. That It is 
hereby directed that upon surrender of 
tags and licenses heretofore Issued, an 
order be drawn on the general fund 
In the sum of $8.00 to effect a refund 
to the Schlltz Brewing company of this 
Jimount paid in error. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution and it was de- 
clared adopted upon the following vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince. — 5. 

Navs — None. 

Passed Mav 19, 1913. 

Approved May 21, 1913. 

By Commissioner Voss: 

Resolved^ That the city treasurer Is 
hereby directed to receive from the 
owner of lot 4, block 16, Highland 
Park division, the amount of the orig- 
inal assessment levied against said lot 
for the construction of a sanitary 
sewer In Sixth alley under Contract No. 
1330. provided the same Is paid within 
five days from the date of the passage 
of this resolution, and further provided, 
that said owner shall at the same time 
pay $1.50, the estimated cost of the 
publication of this resolution. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution and It was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt Murcnlson, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 19, 1913. 

Approved May 21, 1913. 

By Commissioner Voss: 

"Resolved, That requisitions of city 
officers and departments Nosv 3622 to 
3730, Inclusive, be and hereby are ap- 
proved. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution and it was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 19. 1913. 

Approved May 21. 1913. 



B.V Commissioner Voss: 
Reaolvedi That miscallaneoua bills 



against the city for the month of April. 
1913, be and hereby are allowed, and 
it is hereby directed that orders be 
drawn on the city treasurer, to pay the 
same, as follows: 

PUBLIC UTILJTY FUND. 

Printing Service, $210.52; Architects 
& Engineers' Supply company, $24.42; 
Baker-Vawter company, $9.08; Baxter 
Sash ft Door company, $45.00: D. R. 
Black company. $17.50; E. F. Burg. 
$2.70; Carnegie Fuel company, $82.1*1; 
Chamberlain-Taylor company, $6.00; 
CliTistle Lithograph ft Printing com- 
pany, $171.60; George M. Clark & Co., 
$179.78; James H. Clow ft Sons, $35.97; 
O. F. Collier Press, $39.00; Columbus 
Buggy company. $3.60; Co-Operatlve 
Sales company. $6.90; Charles P. Craig. 
$16.00; D. G. Cutler company. fll;5; 
Duluth Brass Works company, $13.78; 
Duluth OH company. |51.85; Du- 
luth Photo-Engraving company. $1.25; 
Duluth Plumbing Supplies company. 
$72.32; the Duluth Street Railway com- 
pany. $1.98; the Elliott company. $29.63. 
Equitable Meter company, $28.00; the 
Foos Gas Engine company, $4.22; *• ^• 
KoiBythe, V. S.. ^35. 00; Gary Lumber 
company, $445.55; Globe Iron Works, 
$1.12; Greer Printing company, $11.50; 
the Heimbach Lumber company, 
$1.10; James Henderson, $3.81; Ihe 
Herald company, $32.30; Daniel Keefe, 
$19.00; Kelley Hardware company, 
$21.37. A. H. Krleger company, $3.36; 
Kruegei-'s Transfer company. $22.97; 
J. J. Le Tourneau Printing company, 
$50.25; Lindsay Ught company, $2.65; 
the Linen Exchange, $3.45; John Liosan. 
$2.75; Lyceum Livery company, $81. oo; 
Marshall-Wells Hardware company, 
$24.50; G E. McI-iean. treasurer, $9.10; 
Leonard McNamara, $7.00; I. P. Morris 
company, $24.50; IL Mueller Manufac- 
turing company, $396.25; National Iron 
company. $118.00; National Meter com- 
pany, $23.64; Neptune Meter company. 
$28.85- New Duluth Transfer company. 
$70.50; Northern Hardware company. 
$1.10; Northland Prlntery, $11.25; 
Thomas Olafson. $15.00; Ouellette ft 
Co.. $5.88; Pittsburg Coal company. 
$277.17; "Vl^. M. Prlndle, $15.00; Quayle- 
Larsen company, $3.30; J. 8. P^y ft 
Co., $4.96; Robinson, Gary & Sands 
company. $66.50; Frederick W. Shep- 
perd, $3.00; the Standard Meter com- 
pany. Inc., $4.50; Standard Oil company, 
$26 47- Standard Salt ft Cement com- 
pany, '$11.68; the St. Louis Couiity btate 
bank, $28.60; Stone-Ordean-W ells com- 
pany, $3.00; the SufEel company. |13.30. 
Thomsen Foundry company. $20.43, 
Thomson Meter company, $32. Oa; u. v_^. 
Tower, $17.84; Viscosity 01\^c'^'"P5"y^ 
$11.25; Welsbach company, $20.19; West 
Duluth ft Duluth Transfer company. 
$100.50; the Western Union Telegraph 
company, $1.00: Wleland ft ^ ade. 
$10 20; R. Williamson ft Co., $13. oo, 
Zenith Sale ft Boarding Stable. $.-> 6.41; 
Zenith Telephone company, $227.5U. L. 
Merrltt, S. R. Hatch (contingent fund), 
$1,360 02; the Boston Talking Machine 
company. $20.51; C^'cag^ C^r focal 
company. $7.75; American Bridge Com- 
pany of New York. $1,702.08; Transo 
Paper company, $160.00. 

PUBLib SAFETY FUND. 
Fire Department. 

W. A, Abbett. $12.21; American L^ 
France Fire Engine company. $11.60. 
Bayha ft Co.. $7.20; E. J Bunker. 
$16 88- C O. Bergqulst. $2.50; Corn- 
pianter Oil company. $42.10; City of 
Duluth water and light department, 
$82 83: Chicago Flexible Shaft com- 
pany $7.27; Crane ft Ordway company. 
$6 06- Duluth-Edlson Electric company, 
$60.76; Duluth Telephone company, 
$40.60; Diamond Calk Horse Shoe com- 
nanv $35 40; Duluth Boiler Works, 
$12 70: Duluth Universal Milling com- 
pany. $2L25; Electric Service ft Repair 
company. $22.05; O^aham & Hessert. 
$25.60; George C. Hale. TO-OO J. G. 
Harris, $34.75; HoUlhan & Milostan. 
$3 75 E. G. Hllllard, $12.00; Inters ate 
Traction company. $30.00; , Interstate 
Auto company, $13 49; KeRey Hard- 
ware company. $9.88 : V^^^^l'^ J^ 
Thomson company. $20.02; Louis Kaz- 
mier $7.00; Marshall-Wells Hardware 
oomnanv $28 97; Northwestern Fuel 
com^ny! $260.18; Northwestern Paint 
companv. $39.94; National Iron com- 
pany. $4.25; Peerless T^un^ry company. 
J42 07- G R Peterson, $7.00. r. a. 
T>fltHck & Co. $33.50; Rust-Parker- 
Sar?l?compSny. $38.00; Standard SaU 
& Cement company. *1|,':, standard 
Oil company, $10.23: R.M- ^V hlte. 
$170.98; Zenith Telephone company. 

$6.00. _ . 

Police Department. 

Acme laundry, $12.00; E. A- Arm- 
strong Manufacturing company $12^54. 
Charles A. Brophy, $^9.00; E. F. Burg. 
70 cents; Burgess Electric company, 
$1.10; Central Repair shop, f4-75, 
Chamberlain-Taylor co^P^^ny, $58.95, 
city of Duluth, water and light de- 
oartment $25.81; the Detective Pub- 
lishing company.' $6.00; Duluth-Edlson 
Electric company, $2.66; Duluth fire de- 
nartment $85.00; Duluth Hardware 
company $2.13; Duluth Machinery 
company," $7 20; Duluth Street Railway 
comcany $100.00; Duluth Telephone 
company! $72.75; Duluth Oil company. 
$2 00- Electric Service ft Repair com- 
pany. $8.50; Franklin Automobile com- 
pany $143.17; Walter Holmberg. $2.58; 
Huntley Printing company, $3.50. 
Heimbach Lumber company. f^JfO. 
The Herald company, $2.20; Kelley 
Hardware company. $21.00; Leithhead 
Drug company, $1.00; North American 
Teleiraph company. $11.61; Orpheum 
pharmacy. $3.00; Ouellette ft Co.. $3.70, 
L. A. Paddock company, $29.60; F. A. 
Patrick ft Co.. $1.60; Peyton Paper 
company, $1-35; Quayle-Larsen com- 
pany. $1^.98; J. M. Quick. ^2.00- Rem. 
Ington Typewriter company, $87.60; 
Shuman ft Melnlk, $87.50; J. S. Stron- 
ach. $10.00; C. H. Troyer. $93.87; B.. G. 
WalUnder. $11.50; C. /. Wiggertg & 
Son $2.50; Wennberg ft Widen, $19. ■13; 
Wendlandt Bros, ft Co.. $17.25; West- 
ern Union Telegraph company $18.91; 
Zenith Telephone company. $37.00. 
Health Department. 

E D Curry $4.80; Duluth-Edlson 
Electric company, $3.64; Duluth Street 
Railway company, $16.00; Lane Print- 
ing company. $4.00; Minnesota state 
board of health, $25.00; North Land 
Prlntery $13.25; National Stamp ft 
Printing' company, $6.80; Ouellette ft 
Co 85 cents; PL E. Webster. M. D., 
$37!79; Zenith Telephone company, 

GENERAL FUND. 

Roscoo B. Anderson. $10.00; D. Ap- 
pleton ft Co.. $9.00; Burgess Electric 
companj', $2.15; E. F. Burg, $30.00; 
John Bussa, 78 cents; city of Duluth, 
water and light department. $24.41; 
Christie Lithograph & Printing com- 
pany. $51.00; Callaghan ft Co.. $13.00; 
T. A Caswell. $12.00; Duluth-Edlson 
Electric company. $94.17; Duluth Street 
Railway company. $80.00; Duluth Van 
ft Storage company $3.00; East End Ice 
company, 6 J cents; R- A. Folkerts. $1.10; 
Globe Irbn Works, $1.09; Greer Print- 
ing company, $1.25; the Heimbach 
Lumber company, $6.40; The Herald 
company. $4d2.10; J. P. Johnson, clerk 
district court $2.00; Lawyers' Co-op- 
erat've Publishing company. $1.50; the 
Linen Exchange. $4.00; Merrltt ft Hec- 
tor $37.50; D. B. McDonald. $525.00; 
the' Municipal Journal, $21.00; Northern 
Equipment company, $16.00; A. C. 
Noble $15.00; National Stamp ft Print- 
ing company. $182.05; Northwestern 
Fuel company. $130.95; Ouellette & Co., 
$21.85; Pittsburg Coal company, 
$15.00; Remington Typewriter com- 
pany, $106.60; Rankin Printing com- 
pany $20.45; Richardson Electric com- 
pany! $129.75; Peter Smith Heater 
companv. $4.00; Peter Sherwy, $3.00; 
Sanitary Plumbing company, $6.40; 
George E. Thorpe. $4.69; Underwood 
Typewriter company, 75 cents; West- 
ern Union Telegraph company, $3.60; 
J A Watterworth, $8.92; Yale com- 
pany' $1.00; Zenith Telephone company, 
$24.00. 
GENERAL FTJND (Infectious Disea.''e8.) 

W. A. Abbett. $12.10; Brldgeman- 
Russell company. $11.05; Cruse ft Oet- 
tlker, $131.67; O. F. Collier Press, 
$16.60; city of Duluth, water and light 
department. $26.90; Duluth-Edison 
Electric company, $25.40; Duluth Street 
Railway ocmpany. $115.00; H, F. Dairs 
ft Co.. $1.80; De Prea Chemical 
companv, $86.40; Duluth Cash Supply 
company, $85.63; Kelley Hardware 
company, $2.50; Lyceum Llverv com- 
pany. $7.60; W. B. Logan. $144.19; Nell 
McDougall. $29.55; .Anton Moe. $64.85; 
North Land Printery. $11.00; Northern 
Hardware company. $8.65; People's 
meat market, $9.05; Pittsburg Coal 
company, $60.25; John E. Roos. $31.05; 
L. P. Totman. $70.50; E. M. Tredway, 
$86.51: N. H. Witt company. $27.32; Ze- 
nith 'Telephone company. $28.00. 
PUBLIC WORKS FUND. 

R. 3. Abell. $10.00; Architects ft En- 
gineers' Supply company. $56.45; city 
of Duluth, water and light department. 
$76.00; Crane ft Ordway company, 
$6.38; Carnegie Fuel company, $9.60: 



Chamberlain-Taylor company, {10.7^; 
Duluth Street Railway company. f«0.00; 
Deetz ft Co.. Inc., $48.75; Duluth Lum- 
ber company. $398.87; Gogebic Steam 
Boiler works. $5.64; The Herald com- 
pany, $3.30- the Heim.bach Lumber 
company, $22.32; Charles Johnson, 
$2.50; Kelley Hardware company, 
$4.40; Leonard McNamara. $136.65; 
Northern Hardware company, $18.10; 
National Hardware Supply company. 
$7.25; North Land Coal company, 19.50; 
Northwestern Fuel company $5.50; 
Rankin Printing company, $3.25; Rem- 
ington Typewriter company. 95 cents; 
Triumph Steel companv, $72.16; John 
Wilson, city engineer. $10.00; Zenith 
Furnace company $5.00; Zenith Tele- 
phone company, $9.00 

PUBLIC WELFARE FUND. 

Anderson & Gow $3.25; Ed. Bern- 
hardt, agent. $50.00; city of Duluth, 
water and liglit department, $10.26; C. 
Dinwiddle. $6.75; Gronseth ft Olson, 
$7.92; Frank Hicks, $j.OO; Lyceum 
Livery company, $5.00; L. Paietta. 
$5.79; Pittsburg Coal company. $15.80; 
Troy Laundering company, $1.31; 
Western Union Telegraph company. 
$1.34; Zenith Furnace company $6.45. 
LIBRARY FUND. 

The Boston Book company $53.25; 
Bayha ft Co.. $3.00; Victor Carlson. 
$75.00; cash account $30.14; city of 
Duluth water and light department. 
$6.99; Duluth-Edlson Electric com- 
pany, $44.58; Duluth Gun Shop, $6.00; 
George A. Gray company, $1.20; Kelley 
Hardware company. $2.70; E. J. Ket.^h- 
um. $13.75; the Linen Exchange, $8.00; 
Library Bureau. $135.50; J. J. Le Tour- 
neau Printing company, $106.25; Na- 
tional Educational association. $2.00; 
Nation Municipal league, $5.00; Ouel- 
lette ft Co., $2.10; Peyton Paper com- 
pany, $2.50; Sanitary Plumbing com- 
fany, $1.00; Union Library association, 
1.030.81; Waldorf Bindery company. 
$111.20. 

PERMANENT IMPROV MENT RE- 
VOLVING Fl'.VD. 

The Consolidated Abstract company. 
$13.60; The Herald company^ $134.55; 
Union Abstract companv, $28. So. 
PERMANENT I.MPROVEMENT FUND. 

A. Roberts & Co.. $600.00. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and It was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeis — Comn.issioners Hlcken. Mer- 
rltt, Murchlrion, Voss. Mayor Prince — 6. 

Nays — -.one. 

Passed May 19. 1913. 

Approved May 21. 191S. 

By Commissioner Voss: 

Resolved, That estimates to contrac- 
tors are hereby allowed and It is here- 
by directed that orders be drawn on 
the city treasurer to pay the same as 
follows: 
PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT FUND. 

To Hector McLean In the sum of 
$45.35 on his contract for the con- 
struction of a storm sewer extension 
on First avenue west from the pres- 
ent terminal to the dock line. 
PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT RE- 
VOLVING FUND. 

To J. W. Preston In the sum of $2.01 
on his contract for the grading of Fif- 
ty-eighth alley west from Fifty-sev- 
enth avenue west to the southerly line 
of lot 13. block 78. West Duluth, Sixth 
division. 

To J. W. Preston In the sum of 
$1,435.27 on his contract for paving 
"Twenty-first avenue west from the 
djook to the south line of Third street. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution and it was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Comml.ssloners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince— fi. 

Passed May 19. 1913. 

Approved May 21, 1913. 



By Commissioner Murchison: 

Resolved, That this council deetn* it 
necessary for public convenience and 
safety that a sanitary sewer be con- 
structed in Jay street from Forty- 
fourth to Forty-eighth avenues east 
with outlet In Forty-eighth avenue 
east to the sewer in Pitt street and 
It is hereby ordered that said sewer 
be constructed. 

Resolved further. That It Is hereby 
directed that said work be done by 
contract, the cost thereof to be paid 
from the permanent improvement re- 
volving fund and It Is further ordered 
that an assessment be levied upon the 
property benefited by the construc- 
tion of said sewer according to the 
benefits received to defray the cost 
of such improvement with such other 
expenses as under the provisions of 
the city charter may be assessed. 

Commissioner Hlcken moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt. Murchison. Voss. Mayor Prince — 6. 
Nays — None. 
Passed May 19, 1913. 
Approved May 21. 1913. 

By Commissioner Murchison; 

Resolved, That this council deems It 
necessary for public convenience and 
safety that sidewalks be constructed 
In the city of Duluth as herelnbelow 
set forth and It Is hereby directed that 
said sidewalks be constructed as fol- 
lows: 

DISTRICT NO. 1. 

A B-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Sixteenth avenue east from 
Third street to Fourth alley; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Eighteenth avenue east from 
Sixth street to Sixth alley; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Eighteenth avenue east from 
70 feet south of Jefferson street, south- 
erly 80 feet; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Eighteenth avenue east from 
London road southerly 150 feet; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Twenty-second avenue east 
from Third street southerly 160 feet; 

A B-foot 4-lnch walk on the west 
side of Twenty-second avenue east 
from 160 feet south of Third street to 
Second street; 

A 4-foot plank walk on tha west 
side of Twenty-third avenue east from 
D. ft I. R. right-of-way to South 
street; 

A 6-foot cement wjjk on the west 
side of Twenty-sixth avenue east from 
Superior street to the sdley south of 
Superior street; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Fifty-first avenue east from 
Dodge street to London road; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the west side 
of Fifty-second avenue east from Su- 
perior street to Tioga street; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Fifty-eighth avenue east from 
Superior street to the alley south of 
Superior street; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Sixtieth avenue east from Su- 
perior street to the D. ft I. R. tracks; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Third street from a point 100 
feet west of Nineteenth avenue east to 
Eighteenth avenue east; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Third street from Sixteenth 
avenue east to Seventeenth avenue 
east; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Fourth street from Sixteenth 
avenue east to Seventeenth avenue 
east; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Fourth street from Eighteenth 
avenue east westerly 200 feet; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Fourth street from Twentv-sec- 
ond avenue east to Twenty-third ave- 
nue east; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
side of Fourth street from Woodland 
avenue to Twenty-first avenue east; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
side of Fourth street from a point 
150 feet west of Twenty-third avenue 
east to Twenty-second avenue east; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Superior street from Forty- 
second avenue east easterly 200 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
side of Lewis street from Woodland 
avenue to Waverly avenue; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the south 
side of St. Andrews street from Wood- 
land avenue to Roslyn avenue; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the ea^t 
side of Allendale avenue from Winona 
street to the present walk between 
Wabasha and Mankato streets; 

A 5-foot cement walk on tha north 
side of London road from Forty-fourth 
avenue east to Forty-fifth avenue 
east; 

A 6-fo«C oamant walk on the west 




18 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 




May 22, 1913. 



east 
from 

west 
from 

west 



side of Woodland avenue from Twen- 
ty-first avenue east to Garden street. 
1»ISTHICT NO. 2. 

A 6-foot rement walk on the 
Bide of Fifteenth avenue east 
Fourth street to Third slroel; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the 
side of Fifteenth avenue east 
Fourth street to Third street; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the 
Bide of Fifteenth avenue east from 150 
feet south of London road, southerly 
75 feet; 

A cement crossing in Fourth alley 
on the east side of Fifteenth avenue 
east; 

A cement crossing In Third alley on 
the east side of Fifteenth avenue east; 

A cement crossing in Fourth alley 
on the west side of Fifteenth avenue 
east; 

A cement crossing In Third alley on 
the west side of Fifteenth avenue east: 

A cement crossing In Thitd alley on 
the east side of Fourteenth avenue 
east; 

A cement crossing in Fourth alley 
on the east side of Fourteenth avenue 
east; 

A cement crossing In Fifth alley on 
the east side of Thirteenth avenue 
cast; 

A cement crossing in Sixth alley on 
the east side of Thirteenth avenue 
east; 

A 5-foot cpmrnt walk on the east 
side of Thirteenth avenue east from 
Fifth street to Sixth street; 

A cement crossing in Fifth alley on 
the west side of Tliirteenth avenue 
ea«t; 

A cement crossing in Sixth alley on 
the west side of Thirteenth avenue 
east; 

A 3-foot plank walk on the west side 
of Thirteenth avenue east from Eighth 
street to Ninth street- 

A 3-foot plank walk on the east 
side of TweUth avenue east from 
Kleventh street to Tenth street; 

A -l-foot I'lank walk on the west 
Bide of Twelfth avenue east from Sixth 
street to Seventh street; 

Repair walk on the west side of 
Twelfth avenue east from Fourth 
Street to Third street; 

Repair walk on the west side of 
Twelfth avenue east from Third alley 
to Second street; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the 
of Twelfth avenue east from 
street southerly 100 feet; 
6- foot cement walk on the 
of Twelfth avenue east from 
to Superior street; 



east side 

Repair 
avenue east, 
street: 

A 5-foot cement 
of P'ouitli avenue 



of Fourth avenue east: 
walk on east side of Fourth 
from First alley to First 



walk 
east, 



of Tenth street. 



on west side 
from oti feet 
southerly 28 



side 

ond 

A 

Side 

alley ._ __^ 

A 5-foot cement walk on the 
side of p:ieventh avenue east 
Second street to Third alley; 

A B-foot cement walk on the 
fside of Eleventh avenue east 
Third street to Fourth street; 

A cement crossing In Fourth 



west 
Sec- 
west 
First 

west 
from 

west 
from 

alley 
on the west side of Eleventh avenue 

A ' 4-foot plank walk on the 
side of Eleventh avenue east 
Fifth street to Sixth street; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the 
side of Eleventh avenue east 
Fourth street to Fifth alley; 

A cement crossing In Fifth alley on 
the east side of Eleventh avenue east; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the 
side of Eleventh avenue east 
Fifth alley northerly 30 feet: 

A 6-foot cement walk on the 
side of Tenth avenue east from Fourth 
street to Fifth street; 

A 6- foot cement walk on the west 
side of Tenth avenue east from Third 
street to Third alley; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Ninth avenue east from Supe- 
rior street to First street; 

Repair walk on the east side of 
Ninth avenue east from Third street 
southerly 70 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Ninth avenue east from Fourth 
street northerly 100 feet; 

Repair walk on the 



west 
from 

east 
from 



east 
from 

east 



from 



east side of 
Eighth alley 



the 
from 



east side of 
Ninth street 



In Eleventh street 
of Eighth avenue 

In Eighth street 
of Eighth avenue 

walk on the east 



Ninth avenue east 
to Ninth allev; 

Re)>air walk on 
Ninth avenue east 
southerly 25 feet: 

A 6-f6ot cement walk on the wpst 
side of Ninth avenue east from Third 
street northerly 100 f^et: 

Cement crossing in Fourth alley on 
the west side of Ninth avenue east; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Ninth avenue east from Fourth 
alley to Fourth street: 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
Bide of Ninth avenue east from 40 
feet north of Fifth alley, northerly 60 
feet; 

Wooden crossing 
on the east side 
east: 

Wooden crossing 
on the east side 
east: 

A 6-foot cement - - 

side of Eierhth avenue east from Fourth 
street to Fourth alley; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Eighth avenue east from Ninth 
street to Tenth street; 

Repair walk on west side of Eighth 
avenue east from Sixth street to Sixth 

A 8-foot cement walk on the 
Bide of Eighth avenue east, from 
alley to Superior street; 

A' 6-foot cement walk on the 
side of Eighth avenue east, from 
street to Fifth alley; 

A 6-foot cement walk on 
side of Washington avenue, 
perlor street to First alley; 

A 6-foot cement walk on 
side of Seventh avenue east, 
ond alley to Second street; 

Cement crossing In First alley on 
west side of Washington avenue. 

Cement crossing in Second alley on 
the west side of Seventh avenue east; 
A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
of Seventh avenue east, from Sec- 
street to Third street; 
6-foot cement walk on the west 
of Seventh avenue east, from 
Fourth alley to Fourth street; 

A cement cro.sslng in Fourth alley on 
west side of Seventh avenue east; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Seventii avenue east, from 
Fourth street to Fifth street; 

Cement crossing in Fifth alley on the 
west side of Seventh avenue east; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Seventh avenue east, from Sec- 
ond street to Third street; 

Cement crossing in Third alley on the 
east side of Seventh avenue east; 

Repair walk on east side 
avenue east, from Third 
Fourth alley; 

east side 



south 
feet. 

A 6-foot cement walk on west side of 
Fourth avenue east, from Eighth street 
to Ninth alley; 

A 5- foot cement walk on west side of 
Fourth avenue east, from Seventh 
street to Eighth street; 

Cement crossing in Eighth alley on 
west side of Fourth avenue east; 

Repair walk on west side i>f Fourth 
avenue east, from First street to Sec- 
ond street. 

A 6-foot cement walk on west side of 
Third avenue east, from l-'ointh alley 
northerly 35 feet; 

Cement crossing In Fourth alley on 
west side of Third avenue east; 

Repair walk on west side of Third 
avenue east, from F'ourth street south- 
erly 105 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on west side 
of Third avenue east, from Second 
street to Third alley; 

Cement crossing In Third alley on 
west side of Tliird avenue east; 

Repair walk on west side of Third 
avenue east, from Second street to Sec- 
ond alley; 

Repair walk on ea.st side of Third 
avenue east, from P''ourth street to 
Fourth alley; 

A 6-foot cement walk on east side of 
Second avenue east, from Third street 
to Fourth alley; 

A 6-foot cement walk on east side of 
Second avenue east, from Fourth street 
to Fifth street; 

Cement crossing In Fifth alley on 
east side of Second avenue east; 

A 6-foot cement walk on west side 
Second avenue east, from 40 feet 
of Fifth alley, northerly 45 feet; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the 
side of Second avenue east, from 
street to Sixth alley; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the 
side of Second avenue east, from 
street southerly 26 feet; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the vaai 
side of First a\enue east, from Seventh 
street to Ninth alley; 

Cement crossing in Eighth alley on 
the east side of First avenue east; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the east side 
of First avenue east, from 
street southerly 115 feet; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the east 
side of First avenue east, from Sixth 
street to Seventh alley; 

Cement crossing In Seventh alley on 
the east side of First avenue east; 

A B-foot cement walk on the east 
side of First avenue east, from Fifth 
street northerly 110 feet- 

Cement crossing In Fifth alley on 
east side of First avenue east; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the east 
side of First avenue east from Fourth 
alley, northerly 110 feet; 

Cement crossing In Fourth alley on 
east side of Pirst avenue east; 

Cement crossing In Ninth alley on 
west side of First avenue east; 

Cement crossing in Eighth alley on 
west side of First avenue east; 

Repair walk on west side of First 
avenue east from Seventh alley to 
Seventh street; 

Repair walk on west side of First 
avenue east from Sixth alley to Sixth 
street; 

An 8-foot plank walk on east side 
of First avenue east from Second alley, 
northerly 30 feet; 

An S-foot plank walk on east side 
of First avenue east from FMrst street, 
northerly 115 feet; 

A 5-f6ot cement walk on west side 
of Tenth avenue east from Eighth 
street to Ninth street; 

Cement crossing in Fifth alley on 
west side of Lake avenue; 

A 5-foot cenoent walk on east side of 
Lake avenue from 70 feet south of 
Ninth street, southerly 62 feet; 

A 0-foot cement walk on east side of 
from Ninth street, north- 



of 
north 

•west 
Fifth 

west 
Sixth 

east 



Seventh 



on south side 
Tenth avenue 



south 
feet 



side 

west 
feet; 
Bide 
east 



of 

of 

of 
of 



Lake avenue 
erly 75 feet; 

A 5-foot cement 
cade street from 
easterly 120 feet; 

A B-foot cement 
cade from Sixth 
feet; 

A 5-foot 
cade street 



walk on south Cas- 
First avenue west, 

walk on east Cas- 
street. northerly 120 



on east Cas- 
south of Sixth 



west 
First 

west 
Fifth 



the west 
from Su- 

the west 
from See- 



the 



sUlo 
ond 

A 

side 



of Seventh 
street to 



Repair walk on 
avenue east, from 
alley; 

A a-foot cement 
Seventh avenue 
street to Seventh 



of 



Fifth street 



Seventh 
to Sixth 



walk on east side of 

east, from Sixth 

alley; 

Cement corner at southeast corner of 

Tenth street and Seventh avenue east; 

Repair walk on east side of Seventh 

avenue east, from Tenth street to 

Eleventh street; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the west side 
of Sixth avenue east, from Tenth alley 
to Ninth street; 

Wooden crossing in Tenth alley on 
west side of Sixth avenue east; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the west side 
of Sixth avenue east, from Ninth alley 
northerly 70 feet; 

Wooden crossing in Ninth alley on 
west side of Sixth avenue east; 

A 4-foot plank walk on west side of 
Blxth avenue east, from Seventh street 
to Sixth street; 

A 6-foot cement walk on west side 
of Sixth avenue east, from Fifth street 
to Sixth alley; 

A 4-foot plank walk on east side of 
Sixth avenue east, from Tenth alley 
to Ninth street; 

Wooden crossing in Ninth street on 
east Bide of Sixth avenue east; 

A 5-foot cement walk on east side of 
Fifth avenue east, from Sixth street 
southerly 45 feet; 

Repair walk on east side of Fourth 
avenue east, from Boulevard to Tenth 
street; 

A 5-foot 4-lnch plank walk on east 
side of Fourth avenue east, from Tenth 
street southerly 70 feet; 

Repair walk on east side of Fourth 
avenue east, from Ninth street to 
Tenth alley; 

A 5-foot cement walk on east side of 
Fourth avenue east, from Eighth street 
to Ninth alley; 

Cement crossing in Ninth alley on 
east side of Fourth avenue cast; 

A 5-foot cement walk on east side of 
Fourth avenue east, from Seventh 
atreet to Eighth street; 

Cement crossing in Eighth alley 



cement -walk 
from 45 feet . 
street, southerly 80 feet; 

A 3-foot plank walk on the west side 
of Second avenue west from Sixth 
street, northerly 70 feet; 

Wooden crossing In Sixth street on 
west side of Second avenue west- 

A 5-foot cement walk on east side of 
Third avenue west from Mesaba ave- 
nue to Fifth street; 

Plank stairs and walk on east side 
of Third avenue west from Fifth 
street to Pittsburg avenue; 

A 5-foot 4-inch plank walk on east 
side of Third avenue west from Pitts- 
burg avenue to Sixth street; 

Repair walk on east side of Third 
avenue west from Seventh alley to the 
boulevard; 

A u-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Fourth avenue west from Me- 
saba avenue to Fourth street; 

Cement crossing in Fourth alley on 
the west side of Fourth avenue west; 

Repair walk on east side of Fourth 
avenue west from Second street to 
Third alley; 

Repair walk on west side of Fifth 
avenue west from Sixth alley to Sixth 
street; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Fifth avenue west from Fifth 
alley, northerly 90 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on east side 
of Fifth avenue west from Fourth alley 
to Mesaba avenue; 

A 6-foot cement walk on east side 
of Fifth avenue west from Northern 
Pacific right-of-way, southerly 43 
feet ; 

A 5-foot cement walk on west side of 
Mesaba avenue from Fourth avenue 
west to Second avenue west; 

A 5-foot cement walk on west side 
of Mesaba avenue from Cascade bridge, 
southerly 100 feet; 

Repair walk on west side of Mesaba 
avenue from 100 feet south of Cascade 
bridge, southerly 25 feet; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the east side 
of Mesaba avenue from 50 feet north of 
Third avenue west, northerly 60 feet; 

Repair walk on east side of Mesaba 
avenue from 100 feet north of Third 
avenue west, northerly 25 feet; 

A 5-foot cement walk on east side 
of Mesaba avenue from Eighth alley to 

Lake avenue; , ,, * ,^ * 

A 5-foot cement walk on east side of 
Mesaba avenue from Lake avenue to 
Ninth alley; ^ .^ , 

A 5-foot cement walk on east side of 
Mesaba avenue from Ninth street, 
southerly 80 feet; 

A 5-foot cement walk on east side 
of Mesaba avenue from 150 feet north 
of First avenue east, northerly 240 
feet- 
Repair walk on east side of Mesaba 
avenue from Boulevard to Third ave- 
nue east; * .j * 

A B-foot cement walk on east side of 
Mesaba avenue from Twelfth street to 
Thirteenth street; 

A 5-foot cement walk on east side 
of Mesaba avenue from Thirteenth 
street, northerly 150 feet; 

Repair walk on east side of Lake 
avenue south from 260 feet south of 
Sutphln street, southerlv 275 feet 

An 8-foot plank walk on east side 
of Lake avenue from 75 feet north of 
Buchanan street, northerly 150 feet. 

\n 8-foot plank walk on east side of 
La'ke avenue south from Buchanan 
street, southerly 50 feet; 

Repair walk on east side of Lake 
avenue south from 140 feet south of 
Morse street, southerly 125 feet 

Repair walk on west side of Lake 
avenue south from Morse street, north- 

'"'Repal/^'wilk on north side of Sut- 
phln street from 50 feet east of Lake 
avenue, easterly 90 feet; 

Repair walk on east side of St Croix 
avenue from railroad right-of-way. 
southerly 175 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on front of 324 
St Croix avenue; 

' Repair walk on south side of Morse 
street from Lake avenue, easterly 140 

'^Repair walk on west side of St. Croix 
avenue from Sutphln street, southerly 

^*A*5-Voot cement walk on south side 
of Ninth street. Park Point, from Lake 
avenue to Minnesota avenue; 

Repair walk on north side of Four- 
teenth street. Park Point, from Lake 
avenue to Minnesota avenue. 

A 6-foot cement walk on west side 
of Lake avenue south from No. 709, 
northerly 35 feet; 

A fi-foot cement walk on the west 
<*** 1 side of Lake avenue south from 60 



feet north of Eighth street, northerly 
85 feet: 

A 6-foot cement valk on the west 
side of Lake avenue south from 155 
leet north of Tenth street northerly 
80 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Lake avenue south from Elev- 
enth street, northerly 86 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of I..ake avenue south from 125 
feet north of Eleventh street, north- 
erly 85 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Lake avenue south from Twelfth 
street to Thirteenth street; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Lake avenue south from Thir- 
teenth street to Fourteenth street. 

A 6-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Minnesota avenue from 136 
feet north of Sixteenth street, norther- 
ly 140 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Minnesota avenue from 80 feet 
south of Sixteenth street, southerly 
200 feet; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Minnesota avenue from Thlr- 
tv-eighth street to Forty-third street; 
' An 8-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Michigan street from First ave- 
nue east, easterly 80 feet; 

Repair walk on the south side of 
Michigan street from 80 feet east of 
First avenue east, easterly 35 feet; 

An 11-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Superior street from 25 feet 
east of Fourth avenue east, easterly 60 

feet; ... - * * 

An 11-foot cement walk In front of 

414 East Superior street: 

An 11-foot cement walk on the south 

side of Superior street from 100 feet 

east of Fourth avenue east, easterly 

85 feet; .^ .. « 

Repair walk on the south side of 
First street, from Sixth avenue east, 
westerly 160 feet; ^ „, a. 

Repair walk on south side of First 
street from Seventh avenue east to 
Sixth avenue east; 

A 6-foot cement walk 
of Second street from 
east, easterly 100 feet; 
Repair walk on the 
Second street from 76 
First avenue east, westerly 76 
Repair walk on the north 
Second street from 60 feet 
Fourth avenue east, easterly 60 feet; 

Repair walk on north side of Second 
street from Fourth avenue west, -west- 
erly 100 feet; ,. ^^ ^ ., 
A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
side of Third street from 50 feet east 
of Ninth avenue east, easterly 50 feet; 
A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
side of Third street from Sixth avenue 
east, westerly lO^O feet: 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
side of Third street from 150 feet 
west of Sixth avenue west, westerly 
»0 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the nortn 
of Third street from Second ave- 
east, westerly 100 feet; 
6-foot cement walk on the north 
of Third street from Mesaba ave- 
to Sixth avenue west; 
Repair walk on the south side of 
Third street from 75 feet east of 
p:ightb avenue east, easterly 50 feet: 

An 8-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Third street from Second ave- 
wost, westerly 150 feet; 
6-foot cement walk on the south 
of Third street from Fifth ave- 
west, westerly 100 feet; 
Repair walk on south side of Third 
street from Mesaba avenue to Sixth 
avenue west; 

A 6-foot cement walk on north sloe 
of Fourth street from Mesaba avenue 
to Fourth avenue west; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 

of Fourth street from Sixth ave- 

east to Eleventh avenue east; 

6-foot cement walk on the north 

of Fourth street from Twelfth 

avenue east to Thirteenth avenue east; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the west 

side of Eleventh avenue east from 

Seventh street to Ninth alley: 

A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Fourth street from 50 feet 
west of Third avenue west, westerly 
76 feet; „ 

Repair walk on south side of Fourth 
street from 150 feet west of First ave- 
nue east, westerly 25 feet; 

6-foot cement walk on the south 

of Fourth street from Third ave- 

east, easterly 100 feet; 

6-foot cement walk on the south 

of Fourth street from 150 feet 

of Fourth avenue east, easterly 



ITT" 

e&st, ei 



side 

nue 

A 



side of 
of Lake 



side 
nue 
A 
side 
nue 



nue 

A 

side 

nue 



side 

nue 

A 

side 



on the east 
from Eighth 

on the east 
from Eighth 



Ash 

west 
feet 



A 

side 
nue 
A 
side 
east 



1000, 

east 
feet 



60 feet, 

A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Fourth street from 50 feet west 
of Ninth avenue east to Seventh ave- 
nue east; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Fourth street from Eleventh 
avenue east, westerly 75 feet: 

A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Fourth street from Twelfth 
avenue east, westerly 75 feet: 

A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Fourth street from Twelfth 
avenue east to Thirteenth avenue east; 
A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
.■5lde of Fourth street from Thirteenth 
avenue east, easterly 150 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Fifth street from 176 feet east 
of Thirteenth avenue east, easterly 100 
feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Fourth street from 25 feet east 
of Fourteenth avenue east, easterly 
175 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
,«!lde of Fifth street from Eleventh 
avenu"? east, westerly 25 feet: 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
side of Fifth street from 50 feet east 
of Tenth avenue east, easterly 25 feet- 
Repair walk on the north side of 
Fifth street from 60 feet east of Sev- 
enth avenue east, easterly 50 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
side of Fifth street from Fifth avenue 
east, westerly 150 feet; 

Repair walk on the north side of 
Fifth street from Second avenue west, 
westerly 50 feet; 

Repair walk on the north side of 
Fifth street from 75 feet west of Sec- 
ond avenue west, westerly 50 feet. 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
side of Fifth street from 200 feet west 
of Second avenue west, westerly 50 
feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Fifth street from Eleventh 
avenue east to Tenth avenue east; 
A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
of Fifth street from Tenth ave- 
east. westerly 75 feet; 
6-foot cement walk on the south 
of Fifth street from Sixth ave- 
east, easterly 75 feet; 
Repair walk on south side of Fifth 
street from Fifth avenue cast, east- 
erly 100 feet; ^ .. 

Repair walk on the south side of 
Fifth street from Fourth avenue 
east, westerly 100 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Fifth street from Third avenue 
east, easterly 25 feet; 

Repair walk on the south side of 
Fifth street from 125 feet east of First 
avenue east, easterly 26 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Fifth street from Third avenue 
west easterly 50 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk 
side of Fifth street from 
of Third avenue west, 
feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk 
side of Fifth street from 
west, easterly 125 feet; 

Repair walk on the north side of 
Fifth street from 160 feet west of 
Fifth avenue west, westerly 150 feet; 

Repair walk on south side of Fifth 
street from 225 feet east of Third ave- 
nue west to Mesaba avenue; 

Repair walk on the south side of 
Fifth street from Fourth avenue west 
to Fifth avenue west; 

Repair walk on north 
burg avenue from Third 
easterly 50 feet; 

Repair walk on north 
burg avenue from 125 
Third avenue west, easterly 125 feet. 

Repair walk on north side of Pitts- 
burg avenue from 275 feet east of 
Third avenue west, easterly 25 feet; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the north 
side of Eighth street from First ave- 
nue west to Mesaba avenue; 

Repair walk on the north side of 
Eighth street from 75 feet west of 
Fourth avenue east, westerly 25 feet; 

Repair walk on north side of Eighth 
street from Fourth avenue east, east- 
erly 50 feet; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the north 
side of Eighth street from Fifth ave- 
nue east, easterly 75 feet; 

Repair walk on the south side of 
Eighth street from 125 feet east of 



side 
nue 
A 
side 
nue 



on the south 
lO-O feet east 
easterly 125 

on the north 
Third avenue 



side of Pitts- 
avenue west, 

side of Pitts- 
feet east of 



Third avenue Atst, easterly 25 feet; 

Itepalr walk-on muth side of Eighth 
street from Fourth avenue east, west- 
erly 125 feet; . 

Repair walk on south side of Eighth 
street from 260 fe^rt east of Fifth ave- 
nue east, easterly l{i0 feet; 

Repair walk on atuth side of Eighth 
street from 175 feet east of Sixth ave- 
nue east, easterly 2 5 feet; 

A 4-foot plank wmlk. on the south 
of Eighth street from Eighth ave- 
east, westerly J 00 feet; 
4-foot plank v.'alk on south side 
of Ninth street from Eleventh avenue 
east to Twelfth avenue east; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Ninth avenue east to Eighth 
avenue east; 

A 4-foot plank ^valk on the north 
side of Ninth street from Eleventh 
avenue east to Twelfth avenue east; 
A 4-foot plank n'alk on the north 
side of Ninth stre. t from Sixth ave- 
nue east, easterly ] 50 feet; 

Repair walk on the north 
Ninth street from 7) feet west 
avenue, westerly 5'> feet; 

Repair walk on the north side of 
Ninth street from 100 feet east of 
First avenue west, easterly 50 feet; 

liepair plank walk on north side 
of Ninth street fron 125 feet west of 
First avenue west, westerly 50 feet; 

A 5-foot cement walk on north side 
of Ninth street from Eighth avenuo 
east of Ninth avenue east; 

A 3-foot plank walk on the north 
side of Ninth street from 175 feet west 
of First avenue wetit, westerly 75 feet; 
Repair walk on ;iorth side of Ninth 
street from 260 feet west of First ave- 
nue west, westerly 100 feet; 

A 4-foot plank M-alk on north side 
of Tenth street from Ninth avenue 
east to Tenth avenue east; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the south 
Bide of Tenth strett from Tenth ave- 
nue east to Elever.th avenue east; 

A 4-foot plank -valk on the south 

side of Eleventh street from Eleventh 

avenue east to Thirteenth avenue east; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the south 

side of Eleventh street from Sixth 

avenue east to Sev'enth avenue east; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the north 

side of Eleventh street from Twelfth 

avenue east to Thirteenth avenue east; 

Reset tile walk on the south side of 

Third street from Fourth avenue east, 

easterly 150 feet; 

Reset tile walk on the east side of 
Fourth avenue eas : from Third street 
to Third alley; 

A 4-foot plank walk on new road 
from Sixth avenue east and Eleventh 
street to Twelfth street, and crossing 
on Twelfth street and crossing on 
Eleventh street and Sixth avenue east; 
A 6-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Lake avenue south from No. 
724, southerly 100 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk 
side of Lake avenue- south 
street, northerly 25 feet; 
A 6-foot cement walk 
side of Lake avenuo south 
street to Tenth st)eet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Minnesota avenue from Sev- 
enth street to Elijhth street; 
iDISTRICT NO. 3. 
An 8-foot cement walk on south 
side of Michigan ;»treet from 50 feet 
west of Twelfth t.venue west to the 
westerly line of Piedmont avenue; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Garfield avenue from 
street, southerly 210 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the 
side of Garfield avenue from 75 
north of No. 800. northerly 300 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Garfield avenue from 50 feet 
north of No. 1000, northerly 49 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Garfield avenue from 150 feet 
north of No. 1000, northerly 100 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Garfield avenue from No. 
southerly to No. 1100; 

An 8-ioot cement walk on the 
side of Garfield avenue from 75 
north of No. 900. northerly 50 feet; 

A 6-foot plank walk on the east 
side of Eleventh avenue west from 
Superior street to First street; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
side of First street from Twentieth 
avenue west, westerly 100 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
side of First street from 60 feet east 
of Twenty-first a^'enue west, easterly 
50 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north- 
easterly side of Piedmont avenue from 
Nineteenth avenu* west to Fourth 
street; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north- 
easterly side of Piedmont avenue from 
50 feet northwesterly of Twentieth 
avenue west to Sixth street; 

A 10-foot plank walk on the south 
side of Third street from 25 feet west 
of Seventeenth avenue west, westerly 
25 feet: 

A 6-foot walk on the east side of 
Eighteenth avenue west from Pied- 
mont avenue to Second street; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
side of New street from Eighteenth 
avenue west, easterly 100 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
side of New street from 200 feet east 
of Eighteenth avenue west, 
to Seventeenth avenue west; 
An 8-foot cement steps on 
side of Mesaba avenue from 
street to 21 feet northerly; 

Cement steps comer of Fourth street 
and Piedmont aveiue west; 
A 6-foot cemenn walk on 
side of Seventh aA'enue west 
perior street to F rst street; 
A 6-foot cerreni. walk on 
side of Seventh avenue west 
perlor street to I'irst street: 

A 6-foot cement walk on the north 
of Fourth sti-eet from Sixth ave- 
west to Eighth avenue west; 
6-foot cemeni. walk on the north 
of Third street from Eighth ave- 
west, westerlj- 200 feet; 
DISTRICT NO. 4. 
4-foot plank walk on the north 
of Michigan street from Thirty- 
second avenue weirt to the ore dock; 

A 6-foot cemeni: walk on the north 
side of Superior ;itreet from Twenty- 
fourth avenue west to Twenty-fifth 
avenue west; 

A 6-foot cemeni; walk on the north 
side of First stree-: from Twenty-fourth 
avenue west to a point 100 feet east 
of Twenty-fifth a»'enue west. 

A 6-foot cemeni walk on the north 
side of Second street from Twenty- 
fourth avenue v/esrt. to Twenty-fifth 
avenue west; 

A 4-foot plsnk walk on the north 
side of Fourth stieet from Thirty-sev- 
enth avenue west to Thirty-eighth ave- 
nue west; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the south 
side of Exeter street from Third street 
to Winnipeg street; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the north 
side of Fifth street from Twenty-fifth 
avenue west to a point 96 feet east of 
Twenty-fifth avenue west; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the south 
side of Sixth street from Forty-second 
avenue west to Forty-sixth avenue 

A 4-foot plank walk on the north 
side of Eighth street from the westerly 
line of Forty-sixth avenue west to the 
easterly line of let 1, block 12, Sharp s 

addition; ,. ^. . _,, . 

A 6-foot walk on the east side of 
Twenty-first avenue west from Rail- 
road street to the dock; 

A 6-foot cemert walk on the 
aide of Twenty-first avenue west 
First street to Second street; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the 
side of Twenty-first avenue west 
Fourth alley to k point 70 feet 
of Fourth street: 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Twenty-fl-st avenue west from 
Third street to a point 70 feet south of 
Fourth street; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Twenty- fourth avenue west 
from Michigan street to First alley: 

A 6-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Twenty- fourth avenue west 
from 90 feet north of Third street to 

A 3-foot' planl: walk on the west 
side of Grand Forks avenue from 
Wellington to Fifth streets; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Fortv-thlrd avenue west from 
Third street to Fifth street; 

Plank crossing across West Third 
street on the west side of Forty-second 
avenue west; 

Plank crossing across West Third 
street on the east side of Forty-third 
avenue wcs^;^^^^^ ^^ ^ 

6-foot cemiisnt walk on north 
of Roosevelt street from Fifty- 
avenue west to Fifty-first, alley; 
6-foot oement walk on the south 



side of Roosevelt street from Fifty- 
first alley to Fifty-fourth avenue west; 
A 5-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Roosevelt street from Fifty- 
seventh avenue west to Fifty-eighth 
-west; 



walk on the east 
avenue west from 
Bristol street to 



walk on the 
avenue west 



west 
from 



west 
from 

east 
from 



street be and hereby is 



avenue 

A 5-foot cement 
side of Fifty-third 
100 feet south of 
Roosevelt street; 

A 6-foot cement 
side of Fifty-third 
Nicollet to Main streets; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Nicollet street from Fifty-fifth 
to I'^fty-seventh avenues west; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the 
side of Fifty-fourth avenue west 
Nicollet street to Main street; 

A 5-foot cement v.alk on the 
side of Fifty-seventh avenue west 
Roosevelt street to Nicollet street; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Fifty-sixth avenue west from 
Nicollet street to a point 225 feet north 
of Nicollet street; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Fifty-sixth avenue west from 
Bristol street to Northern Pacific right- 
of-way; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Fifty-sixth avenue west from 
Main street to a point 275 feet north- 
erly; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Fifty-seventh avenue west from 
Nicollet to Roosevelt street; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Flfty-seventh avenue west from 
Northern Pacific right-of-way to Elinor 
street; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the south 
side of Albion street from Fifty-fifth 
avenue west to south line of Duluth, 
Mlssabe & Northern right-of-way; 

A 4-foot plank walk along^ the 
north side of Medina street from Fifty- 
fifth avenue west to Fifty-seventh 
avenue west; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Sixth street from Forty-sixth 
avenue west to Forty-eighth avenue 
west; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the south 
side of Ramsey street from Fifty-sec- 
ond avenue west, westerly 50 feet; 

A 6-foot cement walk on the east 
side of Sixty-first avenue west from 
Bristol street to a point 150 feet south 
of Greene street; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the north 
side of Fifth street from Forty-eighth 
avenue west, westerly 50 feet; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the north 
side of Fifth street from 125 feet west 
of Forty-elghtli avenue west, westerly 
175 feet; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the 
side of Sixty-sixth avenue west 
Nicollet to Roosevelt streets; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the 
side of Fifty-ninth avenue west 
Lavaque street to Fremont street; 

An 8-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Central avenue from a point 
50 feet north of Raleigh street to the 
bridge at Polk street and Central ave- 
nue; 

An 8-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Central avenue from Main street 
to Nicollet street; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the south 
side of Fremont street from Sixty- 
eighth avenue west to Grand avenue; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the south 
side of Greene street from Sixty-sec- 
ond avenue west to Sixty-third ave- 
nue west; 

A 3-foot plank walk on the west 
side of Sixty-ninth avenue west from 
Grand avenue to Sherburn street; 

Wing on the northeast corner of 
Sixty-fifth. avenue west and Polk street; 
Cement crossing on the east side of 
Central avenue and Central place; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the south 
side of McCuen street 
eighth avenue west to 
avenue west; 

A 5-foot cement walk 
side of McCuen street 



West First 

granted. . ^. 

Commissioner Hlcken moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopteO. upon the following 

Yeas — Commlsf-ioners Hicken. Mer- 
rltt. Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince— 6. 
Navs — None. 
Passed May 19, 1913. 
Approved May 21. 1913. 



east 
from 

■U'est 
from 



By Commissioner Hlcken: 

Resolved, That applications for li- 
cense to sell intoxicating llQuors in 
the city of Duluth are hereby granted 
and bonds accompanying same are 
hereby approved as follows: 

Chas. Peterson at No. 609 West Su- 
perior street. _^, „. . o , 

E P. Madden at No. 505 West Su- 
perior street, being a transfer from 
B. J. Madden at the same location. 

A. J. Erlckson at No. 19 South Sixty- 
third avenue west. 

Nils L. Forsgren at No. Ill East Su- 
perior street. . , , , 

Wm. Hesbeck at No. 314 Lake ave- 
nue south. „, ^ r, 1^ 

M. Monaen at No. 617 West Superloi 
street. . .. ^ 

Commissioner Hlcken mo-ved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: , _, 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson, Voss. Mayor Prince— 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 19, 1913. 

Approved May 21, 1913. 

Bv Commissioner Hlcken: 

Resolved, That applications for li- 
censes are hereby granted and bonds 
accompanying same are hereby ap- 
proved as follows: 

POOL AND BILLIARD TABLES. 

F. H. Grlgnon at No. 511 East Fourth 

■ SECOND-HAND STORES. 
Sam Goldforb at No. 310 Lake ave- 
nue south. ^^^ 
PAWNBROKERS. 
J. E. Coll at No. 217 West Superior 
Btreeet. . .. 

Commissioner Hlcken moved the 
adoption of the resolution ana It was 
declared adopted upon the following 

vote ' 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince— 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 19, 1913. 

Approved May 21. 1913. 

On motion of Commissioner Hlcken 
the council adjourned. „,.-,^„ 
C. S. PALMER, 

City Clerk. 



ten dollars. In the discretion of th« 
court, and upon second conviction for 
violation of the provisions of said sec- 
tion 8 shall be punished by imprison- 
ment In the county Jail for not more 
than five days, in the discretion Of 
the court. 

Sec. 5. That It shall be unlawful for 
any person and any clerk, servant, em- 
ploye or agent of any person, directly 
or Indirectly, upon any pretence, or by 
any device, to manufacture, sell, ex- 
change, barter, dispose of or give 
away, or keep for sale any clgarettee, 
cigarette paper or cigarette wrappers, 
or any paper made or prepared for the 
purpose of being filled with tobacco 
without first obtaining a license there- 
for, as hereinafter provided. 

Sec. 6. I^icenses for the manufacture, 
.sale, exchange, barter, disposition op 
giving away or keeping for sale of 
cigarettes, cigarette paper or cigarette 
wrappers made or prepared tof the 
purpose of being filled with t<jbacco 
for smoking, may be granted by the 
council of the municipality wherein 
such right Is sought to be exercised. 

Every such llcen.'-e shall continue for 
a period of two years from Its date, 
unless sooner revoked for a violation 
of this or subsequent laws, and shall 
name the licensee and the place where- 
in he Is authorized to conduct such. 
business. And the fee for such license 
shall be twenty-five dollars. ($25). 

Sec. 7. Every person desiring & 
license under this act shall file with 
the clerk a written application there- 
for stating the person for whom and 
place for which it is desired, and shall 
deposit therewith the amount of the 
license fee. 

Sec. 8. In case of a change of 
ershlp In any licensed location, 
granting the license 
it transferred to the 



easterly 

the east 
Superior 



the west 
from Su- 

the east 
from Su- 



side 
nue 
A 
side 
nue 

A 

side 



west 
from 

east 

from 

south 



from Nlnely- 
Nlnety-ninth 

on the south 
,i .,.^^^^.. from Ninety- 
ninth avenue west to One Hundredth 

H,ll^ V * 

A ^-foot cement walk on the north 
side of Hurd street from One Hundredth 
avenue west to One Hundred First 
avenue west; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the east 
side of One Hundred First avenue west 
from Hurd street to Peary street; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the east 
side of One Hundred Second avenue 
west from Hurd street to Peary street; 

A 4-foot plank walk on the south 
side of Fifth street from Forty-eighth 
avenue vtrest to Fifty-fourth avenue 

^!v^'5-foot 4-Inch plank walk on the 
east side of Sixtieth avenue west from 
Elinor street to a point 150 feet south- 

^'"cement crossings In Pr^scott street 
on both sides of Common w-ealth avenue. 

Cement crossings In McCuen street on 
both sides of Commonwealth avenue; 

Cement crossings in Hurd street on 
both sides of Commonwealth avenue; 

Cement crossings in Peary street on 
both sides of Commonwealth avenue, 

Cernent crossing in Goodhue street on 
the west side of Comnnonwe^alth avenue; 

A B-foot cement walk on the east side 
of Flftv-elghth avenue east from su- 
perior "street to Tioga street; 

A 5-foot cement walk on the west 
side of Fifty-eighth avenue east from 
Sunerlor street to Oneida Btreet; 

^Iment crossings on Superior, Tioga 
and Oneida streets on the west side 
of Flftv-elghth avenue east. 

Resolved further, That It Is hereby 
directed that this work be done bv 
Contract, the cost thereof to be paid 
out of t^e general fund, and it Is fur- 
ther ordered that assessments be lev- 
led uSon the property benefited by the 
construction of said walks, according 
to benefits received, to defray the cost 
!herlof together with such other ex- 
penses as under the provisions of the 
charter mav be assessed. 
' Cor^mbsloner Murchlson moved the 
adoption of the resolution and t was 
declared adopted upon the following 

'"'^Teks— Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
rltt M^chlson, Voss. Mayor Prince.-5. 

Nays— None. 

Passed May 19- l^^^. 

Approved May 21, 1 913. 

Bv Commissioner Murchlson: .^_^^. 
Tfesolved That this council deems 
It niceslarv for public convenience 
Lr,.^ Rofetv that a sanitary sewer be 
constructed In Ninth street from 

IIE = 7£. Ind'l^ if heJell; 

"Hsf^u?lJ^^u^^rss 

S^rc^o^t%^rof\^or)ard 
from the permanent Improvement fund 
«nd it is further ordered that an as- 
seFsrnent be levied upon the propertv 
bSted by^the ^onstruct^on of sai^ 
sewer according to the oenents re 
ceK-ed to defrav the cost of such im- 
nrov^ment with such other expenses 
^s undlrthe provisions of the char- 
ter mav he assessed, 
''comr^lssloner Murch son moved the 
o/^T^ntinn of the resolution and It -was 
declared adopted upon the following 

"''^Yeks— Commissioners Hlcken Mer- 
ritt. Murchlson, Voss. Mayor Prince— 5. 

jj'ayB — None. 

Passed May 19. 1913-.,, 

Approved Ma y 21. 1 913. 

By Commissioner Hlcken: 

Resolved, That applications for li- 
cense to operate motor vehicles upon 
?h2 streets of the city of Duluth be 
and hereby are granted. ^ , . 

Samuel E. Matter, John C. Johnson, 
J c. Helm, Edward Bauer. 

Commlssfoner Hlcken moved the 
oAntion of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 

^°Ye'as— Commissioners Hlcken, Mtr- 
rltt Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince— 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed May 19. 1913. 

Approved May 21. 19 13. 

By Commissioner Hlcken: 

Resolved. That licenses 
of cigarettes are hereby 
follows: 

Peter Peterson at No. 
Third street. , ^ . ^. 

Nicolas Christopher at 

^^CommTs^^loner Hicken moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It -was 
declared adopted upon the following 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
rltt, Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince— a. 
j^'ays — None. 
Passed May 19. 1913. 
Approved May 21, 1913. 



(Ordinance No. 326.) . 

By Commissioner Murchlson: 
AN ORDINANCE TO APPROPRIATE 
FROM THE PERMANENT IM- 
PROVEMENT FUND THE SUM OF 
$2,500 TO PROVIDE FUNDS FOR 
FURNISHING MATERIAL FOR THE 
PWING OF THE INTERSECTIONS 
OF TWELFTH AVENUE WEST AND 
MICHIGAN STREET AND TWENTY- 
FIRST AVENUE WEST AND SU- 
PERIOR STREET AND FOR THE 
EXTENSION OF THE SEWER IN 
MICHIGAN STREET FROM AP- 
PROXIMATELY THE CENTER OF 
THE INTERSECTION OF TWELFTH 
AVENUE WEST AND MICHIGAN 
STREET TO THE WEST LINE OF 
SAID INTERSECTION. 
The City of Duluth Does Ordain: 

Section 1. That there be and hereby 
Is appropriated from the permanent 
Improvement fund the sum of $2,o00.00 
to be used for the purpose of furnish- 
ing of material for the paving of the 
intersections of Twelfth avenue west 
and Michigan street and Twenty-first 
avenue west and Superior street and 
for the extension of the sewer In Mich- 
igan street from approximately the 
center of the intersection of Twelfth 
avenue west and Michigan street to 
the west line of said Intersection. 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take ef- 
fect and be in force thirty days after 
Its passage and last publication. 
Passed May 15, 1918. 
Approved May 16, 1913. ,^,^^ 
W. L PRINCE, 
Attest: Mayor. 

C. 8. PALMER, 
City Clerk. 



own- 
the 
may 
new 



:6 



A 
side 
first 

A 



(Ordinance No. 827.) 

Commissioner Voss: ^^ 

ORDINANCE TO APPROPRIATE 
FROM THE GENERAL FL'ND THE 
SUM OF $1,235.00 FOR PRINTING OF 
THE ANNUAL REPORTS OF CITY 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENTS. 
The City of Duluth Does Ordain t 

Section 1. That there be and here- 
by is appropriated from the general 
fund the sum of $1,235.00 to be used 
for printing of the annual reports of 
city officers and departments for the 
year 1912, 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take ef- 
fect and be in force thirty days after 
Its passage and last publication. 
Passed May 15. 1913. 
Approved May 16, 1913. 

W. I. PRINCE, 
Attest: Mayor. 

C. S. PALMER, 
City Clerk. 

(Ordinance No. 828.) 

Bv Commissioner Hicken: 
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AN OR- 
DINANCE ENTITLED "AN ORDI- 
NANCE TO APPROPRIATE FROM 
THE PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT 
FUND THE SUM OF $500.00 TO BE 
USED DURING THE YEAR 1913 
FOR THE PURPOSE OF PAYING 
FOR LABOR AND MATERIAL FOR 
THE PLACING UNDERGROUND OF 
WIRES OWNED BY THE CITY OF 
DITLUTH." PASSED APRIL 7, 1913. 
The City of Duluth Does Ordain: 

Section 1. That the ordinance en- 
titled "An ordinance to appropriate 
from the permanent Improvement fund 
the sum of $500.00 to be used during 
the year 1913 for the purpose of pay- 
lag for labor and material for the 
placing underground of wires owned 
by the city of Duluth," passed April 
7, 1913, be amended in the title and in 
section 1 thereof by striking out the 
words "permanent improvement fund" 
and inserting in lieu thereof the words 
"public safety fund." 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take ef- 
fect and be In force thirty days after 
its passage and last publication. 
Passed Mav 15. 1913. 
Approved May 16, 1913. 

W. I. PRINCE, 
Attest: Mayor. 

C. S. PALMER. 
City Clerk. 

Ordinance No. 329. 

Bv Commissioner Hlcken: 
AN ORDINANCE PROHIBITING THE 
USE OF CIGARETTES BY MINORS, 
AND PROHIBITING THE SUPPLY- 
ING OF CIGARETTES AND CIGA- 
RETTE PAPER TO MINORS. ANT) 
REGULATING AND PROVIDNG FOR 
THE LICENSING OF THE MANIT- 
PACTURE, SALE, BARTER, EX- 
CHANGE OR GIVING AWAY OF 
CIGARETTES, CIGARETTE PAPER 
AND CIGARETTE TOBACCO: AND 
MAKING THE VIOLATION THERE- 
OF A CRIMINAL OFFENSE, AND 
PROVIDING FOR PENALTIES FOR 
SUCH VIOLATION. 
The City of Duluth Does Ordain: 

Section 1. That It shall be unlawful 
for any person and any clerk, sers'ant, 
employe or agent of any person, di- 
rectly or indirectly, upon any pretense 
or by any device to sell, exchange, bar- 
ter, dispose of or give away to any 
minor any clerarettes, cigarette paper 
or cigarette wrappers or any paper 
made or prepared for the purpose of 
being filled with tobacco for smoking 
or any tobacco prepared for smoking 
In the form of cigarettes. 

Sec. 2. Any person violating the pro- 
visions of section 1 of this ordinance 
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and 
upon first conviction for such viola- 
tion shall be punished by a fine of not 
less than fifty dollars nor more than 
one hundred dollars or Imprisonment 
In the county jail for not less than 
fifteen days, nor more than sixty days, 
or both such fine and Imprisonment 
and costs; and upon second conviction 
for violation of any of said provisions 
shall be punished by Imprisonment in 
the county Jail for not less than thirty 
days, nor more than elghty-flvc days, 
and his license shall tnen be termi- 
nated as hereinafter provided. 

Sec. 8. The smoking of cigarettes 
within this state by any minor is 
hereby prohibited. . , ^. 

Sec 4. Any person violating the pro- 
Bv Commissioner Hlcken: visions of section 8 of this ordinance 

Resolved That the application of ahall be KUllty of a misdemeanor, and 
n.fluth lodge. No. 605, Loyal Order of upon conviction for such violation shall 
Moose for lance hall license at No. J24 [be punished by a fine of not more than 



authority 
authorize 
owner. ^ 

Sec. 9. Any person violating any of 
the provisions of this ordinance, ex- 
cept as herein provided for violation 
of sections 1 and 3, hereof, shall be 
guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall be 
punished by a fine of not more than 
one hundred dollars ($100), or by im- 
prisonment in the county jail for not 
to exceed sixty days. 

Sec. 10. A second conviction under 
this ordinance shall lmmediat»-ly ter- 
minate the license of the person so 
convicted, and such person shall not 
be entitled to another license here- 
under for a period of five years there- 
after. 

Sec. 11. All ordinances and parts of 
ordinances inconsistent with this or- 
dinance are hereby repealed. 

Sec. 12. This ordinance sliall take 
effect and be In force thirty days after 
its passage and publication. 

Passed Mav 15, 1913. 

Approved May 16, 1913. 

AW U -^ '^r J PRINCE. 

Attest: Mayor. 

C. S. PALMER, 
City Clerk, 

Ordinance No. SSO. 

By Commissioner Merritt: 
AN ORDINANCE TO ArPROPRIATB 
FROM THE PUBLIC UTILITY FUND 
THE SUM OF $6,000 FOR HAULING 
PIPE FOR THE WATER AND 
LIGHT DEPARTMENT FOR THE 
SEASON 1913. , , 

The City of Duluth Does Ordain: 

Section 1. That there be and here- 
bv is appropriated from the public 
utility fund the sum of $6,000 for haul- 
ing pipe for the water and light de- 
partment for the season 1913. 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall have 
effect and be In force thirty days from 
its passage and last publication. 
Passed May 15, 1913. 

Approved May 16, 1913. 

W. I. PRINCE. 
Attest: Mayor. 

C. S. PALMER, 
City Clerk. 

Ordinance No. 831. 

Bv Commissioner Hicken: 

AN ORDINANCE TO REGULATE THH 
RUNNING AT LARGE OF DOGS IN 
THE CITY OF DULUTH. 
The City of Duluth Does Ordain: 

Section 1. It shall be unlawful for 
any person owning, possessing or har- 
boring any dog, to suffer or permit 
the same to run at large In any street, 
alley, square, commons, or other public 
or like place in the city of Duluth, 
without first having obtained a license 
therefor from the city of Duluth, and 
complied with the provisions herein- 
after set forth. 

Sec. 2. Every person so owning or 
keeping a dog shall, on or before the 
first day of May of each year, pay Into 
the city treasury the sum of one dol- 
lar ($1) for each male dog and the 
sum of five dollars ($5) for each fe- 
male dog so owned or kept by such 
person, and the city clerk shall there- 
upon enter the name and address of 
such owner or keeper, together with 
a description of the dog licensed and 
Its registered number, In a book kept 
bv him for that purpose, and shall 
issue to such owner of such dog a 
written license, signed by the city 
cleric. 

At "the time of issuing such license, 
the city clerk shall deliver to each ap- 
plicant a metal tag. containing the num- 
ber of the license and the year thereof, 
together with the words "Licensed, 
Duluth, Minn." For each tag so de- 
livered, the said city clerk shall In every 
case demand and collect and pay Into 
the city treasury twenty-five (25) 
cents. All licenses under this ordi- 
nance shall expire the first day of 
May following the Issue. The shape 
and stye of said tag shall be chatiged 
each year, on the first day of May 
thereof. 

Sec. 8. No person owning, possess- 
ing or harboring any dog shall permit 
the same to run at large without a 
substantial collar of leather. Iron, C9P- 
per brass or other durable material. 
to 'which shall be securely attached 
the license tag above required. Dupli- 
cate tags, in case of loss, may be is- 
sued by the city clerk at the expense 
of the applicant. No tags shall be 
used on the collar of any dog other 
than those herein provided for, and 
no person shall remove the collar or 
tag from any dog without the consent 
of the owner, or the party to whom the 
license Is Issued. 

Sec 4. No person shall harbor or 
keep any dog which, by loud and fre- 
quent or habitual barking, yelping or 
howling, shall cause serious annoy- 
ance to the neighborhood, or to people 
passing to and fro upon the streets. 



tRti 



for the sale 
granted as 

8018 West 

No. 148 St. 



No owner of or person harboring or 
keeping a fierce or vicious dog, or 
female dog In heat, shall suffer the 
same to run at large at any time, with- 
in the city limits. 

Any person allowing any dog to re- 
main and be lodged and fed within hia 
or her house store, building Inclosuro 
or premises, for a period of six days, 
shall be considered as harboring or 
keeping the same within the meaning 
of this ordinance. 

Sec 6. The council shall provide two 1 
pounds In which shall be Impounded 
all dogs that may be found running at 
large contrary to the provisions of 
this ordinance. One of such pounds 
shall be located In that part of the 
city of Duluth known as Duluth Prop- 
er and one In that part of the city 
known as West Duluth; and two mem- 
bers of the police force shall be desig- 
nated as pound keepers. and have 
charge of such pounds. 

Sec. e. It shall be the duty of everjT 
patrolman In said police force, and of 
every other person who may be ap- 
pointed by the commissioner of publlo 
safety for that purpose, to promptly 
seise take up and place In said pound* 
all tiie dogs that may be found run- 
ning at large contrary to the provi- 
sions of this ordinance. In any of the 
streets allevs. commons or other public 
or open spaces or places within the 
city; and for every dog so impounded, 
for which license has not been pro- 
cured, the patrolman or party appoint- 
ed as hereinbefore provided delivering 
the same at the pound, shall be en- 
titled to receive from the city treas- 
urer twenty-five (25') cents upon sur- 
render to the treasurer of the receipt 
mentioned In Section 7 hereof; provid- 
ed, however, that any mad dog found 
In the city of Duluth shall be forth- 
with killed, and any dog known to be 
treacherous or vicious, or any dog that 
has bitten persons or animals may, if 
allowed to run at large, be killed by 
any patrolman or officer appointed for 
the purpose of carrying out the pro- 
visions of this ordinance. 

Sec. 7. To the party delivering tha 
same, the poundmaster shall give a re- 
ceipt for each dog, carefully describ* 



I 



>'' 



u . I- 



.U. 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 22. 1913. 



19 



i* 



Ing the same, stating the hour aud 
date of such delivery. 

Sfc. 3. No such do£j shall be re- 
leased from the pound unless the own- 
er or person entitled to demand the 
same shall pay to the poundmaster the 
sum of two dollars to cover the cost 
of Impounding^; i>ut no such payment 
shall be held to exempt the person 
l»ayins the same trom paying the reg- 
ular license fee. as provided In Sec- 
tion 2 hereof; provided, however, that 
any owner of an impounded dog who 
shall exhibit a license showing the 
licensing of such dog. and shall state 
that ho duly provided the same with 
the collar herein provided, shall be en- 
titled to have such dog surrendered to 
him without the payment of a releas- 
ing fee. 

The poundmasters shall keep a care- 
ful record of all dogs received by them, 
with a description thereof, and the 
disposition of the same. They sliall 
weekly pay Into the treasury all money 
received by them for the impounding, 
release or sale of dogs, and shall week- 
ly file w^ith the auditor a report show- 
ing the number and sex of all dogs 
Inxpounded during the week, the dis- 
position of the same, and containing 
the treasurer's receipt for all money 
paid into the treasury. 

Sec. 9. All dogs not claimed and 
released within forty-eight hours aft- 
er being impounded shall be killed; or 
if the animal Is worthy and valuable, 
the same shall be sold by the pound- 
master, at the pound by public outcry, 
to the highest bidder, at the hour of 
noon next succeeding the said forty- 
eight hours, and shall give to the pur- 
chaser thereof a certificate of such 
aale, containing a description of the 
dog and the amount paid therefor. 

Sec. 10. The auditor may. under the 
direction of the council, advertise for 
proposals and enter into contract year- 
ly for the purchase, burying, carrying 
away or other disposition of the bodies 
of all dogs that shall have been killed. 

8ec 11. The director of public health 
of the city of Duluth may, at any time 
when. In his opinion, an epidemic of 
rabies exists, or is threatened. Issue 
an order requiring all dogs within the 
city of Duluth, running at large, to be 
muzzled in such manner as said order 
may prescribe, and for such length of 
time as. In the Judgment of said di- 
rector of public health, may be neces- 
sary for the protection of the public, 
eaid order shall be publi.shed for three 
i3> successive days in the official pa- 

f>er of said city, and after such pub- 
loation It shall be unlawful for any 
person ownine:. keeping or harboring 
a dog, to permit any such dog. wheth- 
er licensed or not, to run at large 
•within the city of Duluth without be- 
ing securely muzzled, as provided In 
said order, until the expiration of such 
time as Is fixed by said order, or until 
said order is revoked; and it shall be 
lawful, and is hereViy made the duty of 
all police officers of said city, or any 
officer appointed for the purpose of 
carrying out the provisions of this or- 
dinance, to impound all dogs running 
at large during the time such order 
remains In force which are not muz- 
zled in accordance with the requlre- 
mev.ts of sai.i order; and no dog im- 
pounded under the provisions of this 
section shall he released from the 
pound unless the owner or person en- 
titled to demand the same shall pay 
to the poundmaster a fee of one dol- 
lar i$l) to cover cost of impounding, 
and shall muzzle said dog before re- 
moving same. 

Sec. 12. Any person or persons vio- 
lating any of the provisions of this 
ordinance, upon conviction thereof, 
shall be fined in a sum not exceeding 
fifty 1 50) dollars, or be imprisoned in 
the county jail for a period not ex- 
ceeding thirty 1 30) days. 

Sec. 13. All ordinances or parts of 
ordinances inconsistent with this ordi- 
nance are hereby repealed. 

Sec. 14. This ordinance shall take 
effect and be in force thirty days after 
Its passage and publication. 
Passed May 19, 1913. 
Approved May 21, 1913. 

W. I. PRIN'CR, 
Attest: Mayor. 

C. 8. PALMER, 
City Clerk. 



Ordinance >'o. 332. 

By Commissioner Hicken: 

AN ORDINANCE TO REQUIRE THE 
OWNERS OF MOVING VANS. FUR- 
NITURE CARS, TRANSFER WAG- 
ONS. EXPRt:SS WAGONS OR DLi- 
HVP:RY WAGONS. TO REGISTER 
AND REPORT TO THE CHIEF OF 
POLICE DAILY THE NAMES OP 
PERSONS. DATES OF MOVING. AND 
PLACES FROM WHICH AND TO 
WHICH SUCH PERSONS REMOVE. 
WITHIN THE CITY OF DULUTH. 
The City of Duluth Does Ordain: 

Section 1. That every person, per- 
sons or corporation owning or operat- 
ing any moving van. furniture car, 
transfer wagon, express wagon, de- 
livery wagon, or any other vehicle or 
vehicles, whether regularly engaged in 
the moving business or not, who is 
about to haul or move, or cause to be 
hauled or moved, any article of house- 
hold goods, trunks or personal effects 
in the possession or custody of any 
resident of the city of Duluth, where 
such resident is changing or about to 
change the place of his or her resi- 
dence, either to another place withir. 
the city of Duluth or to a place with- 
In any other city to which such own- 
ers or operators of moving vans, fur- 
niture cars, transfer wagons, express 
wagons or delivery wagon.s may re- 
move such household goods, trunks or 
personal effects, shall before making 
such removal, secure from the chief of 
police of said city of Duluth, a per- 
mit, on the reverse side of which shall 
be reported, in the blank spaces pro- 
vided for that purpose, by the person 
making such removal, the name of the 
person or family so removed, and a full 
description of the place from which 
and the place to which such removal 
is made, with the street and number 
In each case, and the date of such 
removal, and signed by the drayman 
or other person engaged in such re- 
moval. 

Sec. 2. Where any such movings or 
haulings referred to in section 1 here- 
of are done from any address or place 
to an electric or steam railroad sta- 
tion, depot or .steamboat landing, or 
vice versa, such shall be reported also, 
giving the name of such station, de- 
pot or steamboat landing. If the good.s 
are being or about to be shipped to 
any other town, city or village, the 
nam<» of such town, city or villacje 
shall be given. When .such personal 
effects are moved to or frojn any stor- 
age house, the storage house address 
shall be mentioned. Where no street 
number appears for an address, the 
name of the street, alley or place, lane 
or road In ea-'h direction shall be given. 

Sec. 3. It shall be unlawful for any 
person to give a fictitious name, or de- 
ceive the owner or person in charge of 
any vehicle hauling household goods, 
trunks or personal effects, as to the 
ownership thereof, or as to the place 
from which or the place to which such 
property is being removed. 

Sec 4. The chief of police of said city 
of Duluth shall have prepared and 
shall, upon request and without charge, 
furnish all operators or owner.x of 
vehicles within the city of Duluth. with 
pernuts as provided In section 1 hereof. 

All vehicle owners or operators 
described In section 1 of this ordlnanf^e 
shall procure the necessary permits 
from the office of the chief of police 
on which to file the required data. 

Sec. 5. All v.^hlcle owners or operat- 
ors described In section 1 of this or- 
dinance shall on each morning, except 
Sunday morning, deliver to the office 
of the chief of police or deposit In tho 
United States mail, addressed to the 
chief of policp of the said city of Du- 
luth, all permits used on the preceed- 
ing day, containing all Information as 
required by sections 1 and 2 hereof; 
provided, that on each Monday morn- 
ing, all permits not previously de- 
livered or mailed shall then be de- 
livered or mailed as aforesaid. 

Sec. 6. Any person violating any of 
the provisions of this ordinance shall 
be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, 
and upon conviction thereof shall be 
punished by a fine of not to excet-d 
thirty (30) dollars, together with the- 
costs of prosecution, or by imprison- 
ment In the county Jail not to exc-f-d 
thirty (30) days. 

Sec. 7. This ordinance shall take 



effect and be in force thirty days from 
Its passage and publication. 
Passed May 19, 1913. 
Approved May il, 1913. 

W. I. PRINCE, 
Attest: Mayor. 

C. S. PALMER, 
City Clerk. 

(Ordiiianvc Nu. 333.) 

By Commissioner lilcken: 

AN ORDINANCE TO LICENSE AND 

REGULATE PUBLIC DANCE HALLS 

AND PUBLIC SKATING RINKS. AND 

TO PROIIIKIT IMMODEST D/VN- 

CING AND OTHER DISORDERLY 

CONl>rCT THEREIN. 
The City of Duluth Does Ordain: 

Section 1. No. public dance hall or 
public skating rink shall be conducted 
or operated within the limits of the 
city of Duluth unless the same shall be 
licensed pursuant to the terms of this 
ordinance. 

Sec. 2. The term "dance hall" when 
used in tiiia ordinance shall be taken 
to nuan any room, place or space In 
the city of Duluth In which dancing Is 
curried on and to which admission can 
be had by the public by payment, either 
directly or indirectly, of a fee, or by 
payment of a charge for any service 
auxiliary to dancing or by purchase or 
rental of any article, or by the pur- 
chase, possession or presentation of a 
ticket or token; but the word "dan- 
cing" shall not be held to apply to ex- 
hibitions or performances in which the 
persons paying for admission do not 
participate. 

Sec. 3. The term "public skating 
rink" when used In this ordinance, 
shall be taken to mean any room, place 
or space In the city of Duluth In whlcli 
skating Is carried on and to which ad- 
mission can be had by the public by 
the payment, either directly or Indi- 
rectly, of a fee, or by payment of a 
charge for any service auxiliary to 
skating or by purchase or posaesslon 
or presentation of a ticket or token; 
but the term "skating" shall not be 
held to apply to exhibitions or per- 
formances In which the persons paying 
for admission do not participate. 

Sec. 4. Any person desiring a li- 
cense to conduct a public dance hall or 
public skating rink shall file with the 
city clerk a written application ad- 
dressed to the council of said city, slat- 
ing the place and purpose for which 
it is desired and the date from which 
it Is to run, and agreeing that if said 
license is granted, said person will con- 
duct an orderly place and will permit 
no rude, boisterous, unseemly or Inde- 
cent conduct therein, and will faith- 
fully comply with all the terms of this 
ordinance. At tiie next meeting of said 
council after said application is filed, 
said city clerk shall present said ap- 
plication to said council, and said 
council may. In Its discretion, direct 
ihe city clerk to issue a license to the 
applicant pursuant to the terms of said 
application, which said license shall 
be for one year from date, and shall 
particularly describe the room or place 
for which It Is Issued. 

Provided, That no license shall be di- 
rected to be issued or shall be issued 
to any person of known bad character, 
nor to tne keeper of any hoiise of pros- 
titution or place frequented by prosti- 
tutes or other disorderly persons, nor 
to the keeper of any gambling house or 
place where gambling In any form Is 
permitted nor to any person not of 
good character, nor to any person who 
has within one year next preceding the 
filing of his application been convicted 
of a violation of this ordinance, nor for 
any place which has direct communica- 
tion with any room In which Intoxi- 
cating liquors are sold or given away, 
nor for any place from which access 
to any room where Intoxicating liquors 
are sold or given away, can be had 
tither directly or indirectly without 
passing through or upon a public 
street, nor for any place any street en- 
tarnce or outside entrance of which Is 
less than fifty (50) feet from any street 
entrance or outside entrance of any 
place In which Intoxicating liquors are 
sold or given away; nor to any place 
having so-called "private apartments" 
or "private rooms" furnished apparent- 
ly for other than legitimate business 
purposes, which adjoin such dance 
hall or stairs or passageway leading 
to said hall. 

Provided further. That no license 
shall be directed to be Issued for any 
place until the building inspector of 
the city of Duluth shall have certified 
that said place compiles with all the 
terms of the so-called 'Building Ordi- 
nance" of the city, and the health com. 
mlssioner shall have certified that said 
place fulfills the requirements of the 
city ordinances and regulations as to 
ventilation, toilet conveniences, and 
other pertinent regulations relating to 
the public health. 

Provided further. That no license 
shall be directed to be issued permit- 
ting any dance hall or skating rink to 
be conducted at any point within six 
hundred (600) feet of any public park 
or playground. 

Provided further. That before such 
license is Is.'^ued, the applicant 
therefor shall have paid into the 
city treasury or the city of Du- 
luth the sum of Fifty dollars 
($50); except that In cases where the 
entire net proceeds of conducting said 
dance hall or skating rink are devoted 
wholly to charitable or philanthropic 
or litera»'y purposes, no payment of 
any license fee shall be required; and 
the council may In its discretion per- 
mit any lodge or society, not organ- 
ized and maintained for profit, to con- 
duct public dances, without requiring 
the payment of any license fee. 

Provided further. That no license 
shall be required for any buildings 
owned by the city of Duluth. 

Sec. 5. Any license granted pursu- 
ant to the terms hereof may by the 
council be transferred to another per- 
son or place, upon application by the 
license and the proposed transferee, 
provided that no license shall be trans- 
ferred to any person or place to whom 
or for which license at the time of the 
transfer might not be regularly issued 
under the terms hereof; and provided 
further, that the application for the 
transfer, signed by the proposed trans- 
feree, shall contain the same agree- 
ments a.s required for an original ap- 
plicant by section 4 of this ordinance. 

Sec. 6. No per.son, firm or corporation 
shall sell or give away any intoxicat- 
ing liquors, or suffer or permit the 
-same to be sold or given away In any 
licensed public dance hall or skating 
rink: nor shall any person, firm or cor- 
poration sell or give away, or permit 
to be sold or given away, in any li- 
censed public dance hall or skating 
rink, any ticket token, check, pass or 
other thing, which shall entitle the 
holder or owner thereof eitlior direct- 
ly or indirectly to receive any intoxi- 
cating liquore from any person, firm 
or corporation. 

Sec. 7. No person shall In any public 
dance hall or skating rink or In any 
anteroom, corridor, cloakroom, hallway 
or dres.sing room thereof, or in any 
room connecting therewith, drink any 
intoxicating liquor; nor shall any li- 
cense hereundtr suffer or permit any 
person to drink any intoxicating liquor 
in the public dance hall or skating 
rink of which he is licensee, or in an'y 
anteroom, corridor, cloakroom, hall- 
way or dressing room thereof, or in 
any room connecting therewith over 
which said licensee has control. 

Sec. 8. No person or persons shall 
dance, nor shall any licensee hereunder 
permit or suffer any person or persons 
to dance. In any public dance hall any 
indecent or Immodest dance or any 
dance which is characterized by Im- 
modest swaying or moving of the pel- 
vic portion of the body; and those 
dances commonly known as the "islow 
rag," "lovers' two-step," "bunny hug." 
"turkey trot," "Texas Tommy," "wald 
back." and all variations of the same, 
and all dances which aie danced In the 
dark, are hereby declared to be inde- 
cent and immodest dances within the 
meaning of this section. 

.Sec. 9. No licensee, keeper, proprie- 
tor or person In charge of any public 
dance hall shall permit any person un- 
der the age of eighteen (IS) years, ex- 
cept when such person under such age 
I3 accompanied by a parent or guard- 
Ian of such person under age, or any 
Intoxicati'd person or any prostitute, 
or any person of known immorality to 
be or remain therein; nor shall he 
permit any persons to dance therein, or 
any persons except employes to be or 
remain therein, between twelve o'clock 
midnight and six o'clock in the morn- 
ing. 

Sec. 10. No person or persons shall 



In any public dance hall or public 
skating rink act nor shall any licensee 
hereunder permit any person or per- 
Bons in the place of which he Is li- 
censee to act. in a rude, boisterous, ob- 
scene or Indecent manner. 

3eo. 11. Every licensed public hall 
or skating rink shall be brightly Il- 
luminated while In public use, and 
dancing or skating therein while thj 
lights are extinguished, dimmed or 
turned low so as to give imperfect Il- 
lumination Is hereby prohibited and 
made a violation of this ordinanco. 

Sec. 12. The council of the city of 
Duluth may at any time revoke any 
license granted hereunder, but the li- 
censee shall be entitled to be heard and 
shall be given at lea.st one (I) week's 
notice. If any licensee hereunder is a 
second time convicted of a violation of 
this ordinance, his license shall by rea- 
son of said conviction bo and become 
revoked, and such revocation shall be- 
come effective Immediately upon said 
conviction. 

Sec. 13. It shall be the duty of the 
commissioner of public safety of the 
city of Duluth to cause all licensed 
public dance halls and public skating 
rinks to be properly supervised by such 
police officers and police matrons as 
may be necessary to see that tho terms 
of this ordinance are faithfully en- 
forced. And the funds paid into the 
city treasury for license fees under 
this ordinance shall be applied for such 
purpose. 

Sec. 14. Any person, firm or corpor- 
ation violating any of the terms or 
provisions of this ordinance shall upon 
conviction thereof be punished by a 
fine not exceeding One Hundred dollars 
tJlOO), or by imprisonment for a term 
not exceeding eighty-five (85) days. 

Sec. 15. All ordinances and parts of 
ordinances confilctlng with this ordi- 
nance or any part thereof are hereby 
repealed. 

Sec. 16. This ordinance shall take ef- 
fect and be In force thirty days from 
Its passage and publication. 

Passed May 19, 1913. 

Approved May 21, 1913. 

W. I. PRINCE, 
Attest: Mayor. 

C. S. PALMER, 
City Clerk. 

(Ordinance No. 334.) 

By Commissioner Merritt: 
AN ORDINANCE TO APPROPRIATE 
FROM THE PUBLIC UTILITY FUND 
THE SUM OF $L'25.00 FOR PRINT- 
ING OF .VNNUAL REPORT OF THE 
WATER AND LIGHT DEPART- 
MENT FOR THE YEAR, 1912. 
The City of Duluth Does Ordain: 

Section 1. That there be and hereby 
is appropriated from the public utility 
fund the sum of $225.00 to be used for 
printing of annual report of the water 
and light department for the year, 1912. 
Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take ef- 
fect and be In force from and after Its 
passage and ptibllcatlon. 
Passed May 19, 1913. 
Approved May 21, 1913. 

W. I. PRINCE, 
Attest: Mayor. 

C. S. PALMER. 
City Clerk. 
D. H., May 22, 1913. D 795. 



LEGAL NOTICES. 

PROPOSALS FOR ALTERING FRAME 
dormitory. Department of Indian Af- 
fairs. Washington, D. C. May 9, 1913. 
Sealed proposals, plainly marked on 
the outside of the sealed envelope: 
"Proxjosals for Altering Frame Dormi- 
tory. Vermillion Lake Indian School, 
Mirinesota," and addressed to the Com- 
missioner of Indian Affairs, Washing- 
ton. D. C, will be received at the In- 
dian Office until 2 o'clock p. m. June 
16, 1913, for furnishing materials and 
labor for altering frame dormitory at 
the Vermillion Lake Indian School, 
Minnesota, In strict accordance with 
the plans, specifications and instruc- 
tions to bidders, which may be ex- 
amined at this Office, the offices of 
the Supervisor of Construction. Den- 
ver, Colo., the Herald. Duluth, Minn., 
the Improvement Bulletin. Minneapo- 
lis, Minn., the U. S. Indian Ware- 
houses at Chicago. 111.. St. I..oui.s, Mo., 
and Omaha, Nebr.. and at the school. 
P'or further information apply to the 
Superintendent of the Vermillion I^ko 
Indian School, Tower, Minnesota. C. F. 
Hauke. Acting Commissioner. 
D. H.. May 13, 15. 17. 20. 22. 29; June 
3. 10. 13. 1913. 

THE DULUTH & IRON RANGE RAIL- 
ROAD COMPANY. 

Call fdr Annual Stockholders" Meet- 
ing. Duluth Minnesota, May 7, 1913. 

The Annual Meeting of the Stock- 
holders of the Spirit Lake Transfer 
Railway Company, for the transaction 
of any and all business that may come 
before the meeting, including the elec- 
tion of directors and considering and 
voting upon the approval and ratifica- 
tion of all acts and proceedings by 
the officers and Board of Directors 
since the last Annual Meeting, will be 
held at the office of the President, 
Room 502, Wolvin liullding, Duluth, 
Minnesota, at 2 o'clock, P. M., Tues- 
day, June 3, 1913. 

H. JOHNSON, 

Secretary. 
D. H., May 8, 15. 22. 29. 1913. 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE— 

Default having been made in the pay- 
ment of the sum of Tliirteen Hundred 
Ninety-seven and 50-100 Dollars which Is 
claimed to be due and Is due at the date 
of this notice upon a certain Mortgage, 
duly executed and delivered by John 
S. Cherne and Agnes Cherne, his wife. 
Mortgagors, to Fitger Brewing Com- 
pany, a corporation, Mortgagee, bear- 
ing date the lOth day of January, 1912, 
and with a power of sale therein con- 
tained, duly recorded in the office of 
the Register of Deeds In and for the 
County of St. Louis and State of Min- 
nesota, on the 24th day of January, 
1912, at 11 o'clock A. M., in Book 29S 
of Mortgages, on page 108, and no ac- 
tion or proceeding having been Insti- 
tuted, at law or otherwise, to recover 
the debt secured by said Mortgage or 
any part thereof. 

NOW, THEREFORE, NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN, That by virtue of 
the power of sale contained In said 
Mortgage, and pursuant to the statute 
in such case made and provided, the 
.said Mortgage will be foreclosed by a 
sale of the premises described in and 
conveyed by said Mortgage, viz: 

Lot Sixteen (16). Block Twenty (20>, 
Virginia, Minnesota, according to the 
recorded plat thereof on file and of 
record in the office of Register of 
Deeds of .St. Louis County, excepting 
minerals, in St. Louis County and State 
of Minnesota, with the hereditaments 
and appurtenances; which sale will be 
made by the Sheriff of said .St. Louis 
County in his office In the Court 
House, In the (^Ity of l>uluth. In said 
County and State, on the Second day 
of June. 1913, at 10 o'clock A. M.. of 
that day. at public vendue, to the high- 
est bidder for cash, to pay said debt 
and interest, and the taxes, if any, on 
.said premises, and Fifty Dollars Attor- 
ney's fees, as stipulated in and by said 
Mortgage in case of foreclosure, and 
the disbursements allowed by law; 
subject to redemption at any time 
within one year from the day of sale, 
as provided by law. 

Dated April 16th, A. D. 1913. 
FITGER BREWING COMPANY, 

Mortgagee. 
By P. S. ANNEKE. 

Secretary. 
P. C SCHMIDT, 

Attorney. 
D. H.. April 17, 24. May 1, 8, 15 and 21, 

1913. 



.MOREGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE— 

Default having been made In the 
payment of the sum of Five hundred 
Eighty-seven and no-100 Dollars, which 
is claimed to he due and is due at the 
date of this notice upon a certain 
Mortgage, duly executed and delivered 
by Dominic Jerome and Rosa Jerome, 
his wife. Mortgagors, to Fitger Brew- 
ing Company, a corporation. Mort- 
gagee, bearing date the 25th day of 
November, 1907, and with a power of 
sale therein contained, duly recorded 
In the office of the Register of Deeds 
in and for the County of St. Louis and 
State of Minnesota, on the 2nd day 
of December, 1907. at 1:30 o'clock P. M.. 
in Book 246 of Mortgages, on page 238, 
and no action or proceeding having 
been Instituted, at law or otherwise, to 
recover the debt secured by said Mort- 
gage or any part thereof. 

NOW, THEREFORE, NOTICE IS 
HP:REBY GIVEN, That by virtue of 
the power of sale contained In said 
Mortgage, and pursuant to the statute 



In such case male and provided, the 
said Mortgage will be foreclosed by a 
sale of the premises described in and 
conveyed by safd Mortgage, viz: 

Lot Seventeen (.17), Block Twenty- 
flve (25), Re-arrangement of the First 
Division to tho Village now the City 
of Eveleth, according to the recorded 
Plat thereof, excptlng minerals. In St. 
Louis County an^!^ State of Minnesota, 
with heredltameni;8 And appurtenances; 
which sale will bm made by the .Sheriff 
of said St. Louis County dt his office 
In tho Court House, in the City of 
Duluth, In said CJminty and State, on 
the Second day af June, 1913, at 10 
o'clock A. M., of that day. at public 
vendue, to the hUrliest bidder for cash, 
to pay said debt and Interest, and the 
taxes. If any, on said premises, and 
Fifty Dollars, Attorney's fees, as stipu- 
lated In and b.v slid Mortgage in case 
of foreclosure, atid the disbursements 
allowed by law; subject to redemption 
at any time wlthn one year from the 
day of sale, as piovided by law. 

Dated April K.tli, A. D. 1913. 
FITGER BREWING COMPANY, 

Mortgagee. 
Py I'. S. ANNEKE. Sec. 
P. C. SCHMIDT, 

Attorney. 
D. fl. A pril 17. 21 , May 1. 8. 15. 21.1913. 

ARTICLES OF Tn CO RPOR AT ION" 
-OF— 

THE DULUTH TRUNK 
COWPANY, 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRES- 
F;NTS, That we, tho undersigned, do 
hereby associate ourselves together 
and agree to become a corporation un- 
der and by virtue of the provisions of 
Chapter 58 of the Revised Laws of 
the State of Minnesota, for the year 
of 1905, and the --Vi ts amendatory there- 
of and supplementary thereto, and do 
hereby adopt anc. sign the following 
articles of Incorporation: 
ARTICLE I. 

The name of this corporation shall 
be THE DULUTH TRUNK COMPANY. 

The general nature of the business 
of this corporation shall be, the buy- 
ing and selling, at wholesale and re- 
tail, of trunks, i.ravelling bags, suit 
cases, ladies' harid bags and leather 
novelties of all kinds, and the manu- 
facturing and repairing of all such 
articles. 

Tlie acquiring iand holding, by lease 
or purchase, of buildings and real 
estate necessary for the carrying on 
of said business, and the improving, 
selling, leasing, transferring and mort- 
gaging of such buildings, lease hold 
and real estate, and the doing and 
performing of all other acts which 
may be necess.ary and incidental to 
carrying on said business. 

The principal place of transacting 
the business of tnl.s corporation shall 
be at the City of Duluth, St. Louis 
County. Minnesota, and the Corpora- 
tion may have offices and transact 
business in such other states and terri- 
tories of the Unit id States, and in the 
Dominion of Canada, as Its Board of 
Directors shall from time to time de- 
termine. 

ARTICLE II. 

The time of the commencement of 
this corporation thall be the 1st day 
of June, A. D. 1913, and the period of 
Its duration shall be thirty (30) years 
from and after said last mentioned 
date. 

ARTTC!LE III. 

The names and places of residence 
of the Incorporators of this corpora- 
tion, are as follows: 

D. A. L'AmIe, of Duluth, Minnesota. 

E. G. Moritz, of Milwaukee, Wiscon- 
sin. 

F. A. Moritz, of Milwaukee. Wiscon- 
sin. 

ARTICLE IV. 

The government of this corporation, 
and the management of Its affairs, 
shall be vested in a Board of three (3) 
Directors, who, except the first Board 
of Directors, shall be elected by a 
ballot from and by the stockholders 
at their annual meeting, and each Di- 
rector shall serve until his successor 
shall have been elected and qualified. 

The names and addresses of those 
comprising the first Board of Direc- 
tors, until the first annual meeting, 
are as follows: 

D. A. L'.\mle, of Duluth, Minnesota. 

E. Q. Moritz, of Milwaukee, Wiscon- 
sin. 

F. A. MoritB, of Milwaukee, Wiscon- 
sin. 

And they shall hold their office until 
the first annual meeting of the stock- 
holders as herein provided, and, until 
their successors are elected and quali- 
fied. 

The first annual meeting of the 
stockholders of this corporation shall 
be held at Its principal office In the 
City of Duluth, Mnnesota, on the 10th 
day of May, 1914, at two o'clock p. m., 
and thereafter the annual meeting of 
the stockholders of this corporation 
shall be held In its principal office, In 
the City of Duluti, Minnesota, on the 
first Monday in 3fay, each and every 
year, at which meeting a full Board 
of Directors shall be elected. 

The Board of l^irectors shall have 
power to fill all vacancies occurring 
In the Board, or in the office of the 
corporation, and the person so elected 
shall hold office for the unexpired 
term and until his successor is elected 
and qualified. 

The general officers of this corpora- 
tion shall be a President, Vice Presi- 
dent, Secretary and Treasurer, and the 
office of Secretary and Treasurer may 
be held by the same person. The offi- 
cers of this corporation until its first 
annual meeting siiall be: 

E. G. Moritz, p-esldent. 

F. A. Moritz, VI 3e President. 

D. A. L' Anile, Secretary and Treas- 
urer. 

The principal duties of the Presi- 
dent shall be to preside at all meet- 
ings of the Board of Directors, and to 
have a general supervision of the busi- 
ness and affairs of the corporation. 

The principal duties of the Vice 
President, shall be to discharge the 
duties of the President In the event of 
the absence or ditiablllty of the latter 
for any cause w:iatsoever. 

The principal duties of the Secre- 
tary shall be to countersign all deeds, 
leases and conve^'ances, executed by 
the corporation, affix the seal of the 
Corporation thereunto, and to all such 
other papers as shall be required or 
directed to be sealed, and, to keep a 
record of the proc-edings of the Board 
of Directors, and of the annual stock- 
holders' meeting, and to safely and 
systematically keep all books, papers, 
records and documents belonging to 
the corporation or in any wise per- 
taining to the business thereof. 

The duties of the Treasurer shall be 
to keep an accoun'; of all monies, cred- 
its, and papers of any and every kind 
and nature of thti corporation, which 
shall come Into hl;i hands, and to keep 
an accurate accouit of all moneys re- 
ceived or disbursed, or proper vouch- 
ers for any and all monies disbursed, 
and to render sv.ch accounts, state- 
ments and inventories of monies re- 
ceived and dlsbursad, and of all money 
and property on hand, and generally 
of all matters pertaining to this office 
as shall be requited by the Board of 
Directors. 

The said officers shall do and per- 
form such addltlo;ial or different du- 
ties In the conduct and carrying on of 
the business of said corporation as 
jshall from time '.o time be imposed 
or requested by the Board of Direc- 
tors, or as may be prescribed from 
time to time by tlie by-laws. 

The Board of Directors may provide 
for the appolntmerit tft a General Man- 
ager or such other officer as they ma? 
deem for the best Interest of the Cor- 
poration. 

ARTICLE V. 

The amount of the capital stock of 
this corporation shall be Twenty-five 
Thousand ($25,000.00) Dollars, which 
shall be paid In in money or property, 
or services, or In any or either of them, 
at such times and In., such manner as 
the Board of Directors may determine, 
and the value of such property and 
services, shall bo conclusively deter- 
mined by the Board of Directors. 

The number of (ihares In which said 
capital stock shall be divided shall be 
two hundred fifty (850) shares, and 
the face or par value of each share 
shall be $100.00, anl the highest amount 
of Indebtedness Oi- liability to whloh 
this corporation siall at any time be 



subject, shall be Fifteen Thousand 
($15,000.00) Dollars. 

ARTICLE VI. 

These articles may be amended by 
resolution, setting forth such amend- 
ment or amendments, adopted at any 
meeting of the stockholders by a vote 
of at least two-thirds (2-3) of the 
stock of said corporation then out- 
standing. 

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, wo have 
hereunto set our hands and seals this 
14th day of April. 1913. 

D. A. L'AMIE, (Seal) 

E. G. MORITZ. (Seal) 

F. A. MORITZ, (Seal) 
Signed, and sealed. 

In Presence of: 
W. C. GEORG, 
H. 8. STILWELL. 

State of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Coun- 
ty. — ss. 

On this 12th day of May, A. D. 1913, 
before me, a Notary Public, within and 
for said County and .State, personally 
appeared E. G. Moritz and F. A. Moritz, 
to me known to be the persons de- 
scribed In and who executed the fore- 
going articles of incorporation and 
they severally acknowledged to me 
that they executed the same as their 
free act and deed. 

E. REDDEMAN, 
Notary Public, Milwaukee County, Wis. 
(Notarial Seal, Milwaukee Co., Wis.) 
My commission expires June 1, 1913. 



State of Minnesota, County of St. 

Louis. — ss. 

On this 15th day of May, A. D. 1913. 
before me, a Notary I'ubllc, within and 
for said County, personally appeared 
D. A. L'Amie, to me known to be the 
person described In and who executed 
the foregoing articles of incorporation, 
and acknowledged that he so executed 
the same as his own free act and deed. 

EMMA OL.SON, 
Notary Public, St. Louis County, Minn. 
(Notarial .Seal, St. Louis County. Minn.) 

My commission expires Jan. 28, 1920. 



State of Minnesota. Department of 

State. 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed for record In this 
office on the 16th day of May, A. D. 
1913, at 11 o'clock a. m.. and was duly 
recorded in Book X-3 of Incorporations 
on page 19. 

JULIUS A. SCHMAHL, 

Secretary of State. 



200958. 
OFFICE OP RP]GISTER OP DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. 

Louis. S3. 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed in this office for 
record. May 19. 1913, at 1:30 p. m., 
and was duly recorded In Book 15 of 
Misc page 216. 

CHAS. CALLIGAN, 

Register of Deeds. 
By S. L. PIERCE 

Deputy, 
D. H., May 21-22-23, 1913. 

ORDER FOR HEARING ON CLAIMS— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 
In Probate Court. In the matter of the 

estate of Martha Palmer, decedent. 

Letters of administration with the 
will annexed, having been granted to 
Charles L. Rakowsky, It Is ordered, that 
the time within which all creditors of 
the above named decedent may pre- 
sent claims against her estate In this 
Court, be, and the same hereby is, 
limited to six months from and after 
the date hereof; and that the 18th day 
of November, 1913, at ten o'clock A. 
M., in the Probate Court Rooms, at the 
Court House at Duluth in said County 
be and the same hereby is, fixed and 
appointed as the time and place for 
hearing upon the examination, adjust- 
ment and allowance of such claims as 
shall be presented within the time 
aforesaid. Let notice hereof be given 
by the publication of this order in The 
Duluth Herald as provided by law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., May 14th, 
1913. S. W. GILPIN, 

Judge of Prooate. 
Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis Co., Minn. 
D. H., May 15. 22 and 29, 1913. 




Modern East End Home 

Nine rooms, hot water heat, four fireplaces, two 
baths, laundry, large attic; house alone would cost 
more to duplicate than we are asking for whole prop- 
erty. Price, $9,500. 



LITTLE & NOLTE CO. 



EXCHANGE 
BUILDING 



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN. THAT 

the name of the Str. Sahara, built in 

1904, official No. 201012, measuring 
5,785 gross and 4,497 net tons, has been 
changed to Cuyler Adams, pursuant to 
application made and granted tn ac- 
cordance with the provisions of the 
navigation laws of the United States, 
and the rules and regulations now in 
force under such laws. 

THE GLOBE STEAMSHIP CO. 
D. H. . May 20. 21, 22, 23, 1913. 

NOTICE IS HEREBY' GIVEN. THAT 
the name of the Str. Socapa, built in 

1905, official No. 202088, measuring 6,272 
gross and 4,826 net tons, has been 
changed to Qeo. G. Barnum, pursuant 
to application made and granted in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of the 
navigation laws of the United States, 
and the rules and regulations now in 
force under such laws. 

SUPERIOR STEAMSHIP CO. 
D. H.. May 20. 21, 22, 23, 1913. 



NOTICE OFSEALED BIOS 

Notice is hereby given that sealed 
bids will be received by the Village 
Council of the Village of Keewatln, 
Tuesday, May 27th. 1913, up to the 
hour of 8 o'clock P. M., for the con- 
struction of about four blocks of ce- 
ment sidewalks, curbs, gutters and 
cross-walks, plans and specifications 
for which may be had by depositing 
$5.00 with the Village Clerk, iKeewatIn, 
Minnesota. 

Each and every bid must be accom- 
panied with a certified check for ten 
per cent of the amount of the bid. 

"The Council reserves the right to re- 
ject any and all bids. 

Dated at Keewatin Minnesota, this 
15th day of May, 191.1 

J. J. ROBERTvS, 
Village Clerk. 
D. H., May 17. 19, 20, 21. 22, 23. 1913. 



NOTICE OF SEALEO BIDS 



Notice Is hereby given that sealed 
bids will be received by the Villa.go 
Council of the Village of Keewatin, 
Tuesday, May 27th, 1913, up to the 
hour of 8 o'clock P. M., for the fol- 
lowing: 

500 feet of fire hose. 

1 hose cart. 

Tho Council reserves the right to 
reject any and all bids. 

Dated at Keewatin, Minnesota, May 
15th, 1918, 

J. J. ROBERTS, 
Village Clerk. 
D. H., May 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 1913. 



ORDER FOR HEARING ON CLAIMS— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 
In Probate Court. In the matter of the 

estate of James B. Walker, decedent. 

Letters of administration, having 
been granted to J. O. Walker, it la or- 
dered, that the time within which all 
creditors of the above named decedent 
may present claims against his estate 
In this Court, be, and the same hereby 
Is, limited to three months from and 
after the date hereof; and that the 
26th day of August, 1913, at ten o'clock 
A. M., in the Probate Court Rooms, at 
the (jourt House at Duluth in said 
County, be and the same hereby Is, 
fixed and appointed as tho time and 
place for hearing upon the examina- 
tion, adjustment and allowance of such 
claims as shall be presented within the 
time aforesaid. Let notice hereof be 
given by the publication of this order 
In The Duluth Herald, as provided by 
law. 

Dated at Duluth. Minn., May 21, 1913. 
S. W. GILPIN. Judge of Probate. 
Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis Co., Minn. 
D. H., May 22, 29 and June 5, 1913. 

ORDER TO EXAMINE FINAL AC- 
COUNT — 

Slate of Minnesota, 

County of St. Louis. — ss. 
In Probate Court. In the matter of 
the estate of MUoJ Matlc, Decedent. 
The petition of Moritz Helm, as rep- 
resentative of the above named deced- 
ent, together with his final account of 
the administration of said estate, hav- 
ing been filed In this court, represent- 
ing, among other things that he has 
fully administered said estate, and 
praying that said final account of said 
a<knInlstratIon be examined, adjusted 
and allowed by the Court, and that the 
Court make and enter its final decree 



BUY TWO 
OR THREE 
ACRES AT 



EXETER FARMS 



IT WILL 
MAKE YOU 

MONEY 



ALLIANCE REAL ESTATE CO., Lonsdale BIdg. 



BEAUTIFUL 

New Home 

2027 East Fourth St. 

ON EASY TERMS AND 
MONTHLY PAYMENTS. 

Cooley & Underbill Co. 

FIRE INSURANCE, BONDS 
5% — Mortgage Loans — 6% 



NEW HOMES 

On Monthly Payment Plan. 

We have some six-room houses 
on Thirteenth avenue east, above 
Fourth street, just finished, which 
we will sell on very small casli pay- 
ment, and balance monthly, like 
rent. 

They have oak finish, maple floors, 
full basement, large attic, complete 
bathroom, and the lots have 32^4 
feet frontage. Look them over be- 
fore you rent. 

EBY & GRIDLEY 

508 Palladio Building. 



Steel Plant Lots! 

—IN THE— 

Steel Plant City 

-OF- 

GARY, MINN. 

A safe Investment for small in- 
vestors and large investors, 

GARY LAND CO 

202 Palladio Building. 



GARY 



THE HOME OF THE STEEL PLAIVT ; =^ 



BUY NOW I 

Lots on Easy Terms. 

THE HOME REALTY CO. 

200 Alworth Building. 



FOR SALE 

Comer of Sixth avenue east aad Fourtii street, 
50 by 140 fe<"t with church building on front of 
lot and dwelling facing Sixth avenue, six 
roonu and bath, electricity and gaa. Excellent 
oorner for budnets. 

STRYKER, MANLEY & BUCK 



of distribution of the residue of the 
estate of said decedent to the persons 
entitled thereto, and for the discharge 
of the representative and the sureties 
on his bond. It is ordered. That said 
petition be heard, and said final ac- 
count examined, adjusted, and If cor- 
rect, allowed by the Court, at the Pro- 
bate Court Rooms in the Court House, 
in the City of Duluth In said County, 
on Monday the 16th day of June. 1913, 
at ten o'clock A. M., and all persons 
interested in said hearing and in said 
matter are hereby cited and required at 
said time and place to show cause. If 
any there be. why said petition should 
not be granted. Ordered further. That 
this order be served by publioation In 
The Duluth Herald, according to law, 
and by mailing a copy of this order to 
each heir and Interested party at least 
fifteen days before the said date of 
hearing. 

Dated at Duluth. Minn.. May 21, 1913. 
By the Court. 

S. W. GILPIN", .ludge of Probate. 
Attest: A. R. MORTON, Clerk of Pro- 
bate. 
Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis Co., Minn. 
D. H., May 22, 29, June 5. 1913. 

ORDER TO EXAMINE FINAL AC- 
COUNT— 

State of Minnesota, 

County of 3t. Louis — ss. 
In Probate Court. In the matter of 

the estate of Jessie M. Parkhurst. 

Decedent. 

The petition of William H. Sec- 
combe as representative of the above 
named decedent, together with his 
final account of tha administration of 
said estate, having been filed In this 
courts representing. among other 
things that he has fully administered 
said estate, and praying that said final 
account of said administration be ex- 
amined, adjusted and allowed by the 
Court, and that the Court make and 
enter Its final decree of distribution of 
the residue of the estate of said de- 
cedent to the persons entitled thereto, 
and for the discharge of the represen- 
tative and the sureties on his bond. 
It is ordered. That said petition 
be heard, and said final account ex- 
amined, adjusted, and If correct, al- 
lowed by the Court, at the Probate 
Court Rooms In the Court House, In 
the City of Duluth In said County, on 
Monday, the 16th day of June, 1913, at 
ten o'clock, A. M. and all persons in- 
terested In said nearing and In said 
matter are hereby cited and required 
at said time and place to show cause. 
If any there be. why said petition 
should not be granted. Ordered 
further, that this order be served by 
publication in The Duluth Herald, ac- 
cording to law, and by mailing a copy 
of this order to each heir and Inter- 
ested party at least fifteen days before 
the date of said hearing. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., May Slst, 
1913. 

By the Court. 

8. W. GILPIN, Judge of Probate. 
\ ttcst * 

A. R. MORTON, Clerk of Probato. 
Seal. Probate Court, St Louis Co.. Minn. 
D. H., May 22. 29. June 5, 1918. 




IFYOV ARE LQOtWMO 

FOR A Store, Flat 
HovsE, Factory or 

W/?REHOVSB To Reait 
It will Pay lb u 
to Consult Us 

John A. 

Stephenson 

& CO. 

230 W. FIRST STRCtt 



. 




GOTTHAT FARM YET? 

FINE SPRING FOR FARMING ! 

We have some very choline Farms, 
best of locatloiLs. 

Here i.s a Dandy Camp Si>ot on 

a beautiful lake, one mile to depot; 
fine fishing; good shore — 115 per 
acre. 

We have good farms all around 
Duluth. 

WHITNEY WALL CO 



301 Tiirrey Building 



We Have 750 Choice Ijots In 

LAKESIDE 

for sale on easy monthly pa>-mont». 
Our pritx»s are lower N ATUKALLY. 
Our building plan is no experi- 
ment, !iiindred.s h.ave taken advan- 
tag-e of It. Ask your friend;* — it's 
as eai<y a^ pacing rent. 

LAKESIDE LAND CO. 

Chas. P. Craig. Gen. Mgr. 
SELLWOOD BLDG. Phones 408. 



IfYouWanito Make Money 
Buy Crosby Real Estate 

The great Increase in population 
that Is bound to take place this 
sprlfig: will make property go up by 
leaps and bounds. 

Get In now while prices are right 
and save the middleman's profit. 
For prices and terms Inquire of 

GEORGE H. CROSBY 

a08 Lonsdale Bids., Uuliitli, Minn. 

CHARLES S. ROULO 

CrtMbyi Minn. 



EAST END 

$6,750 — No. 418 Seventeenth 
avenue — just completed ; 
strictly modern; $1,500 cash, 
balance in monthly p^iy- 
ments. 

PULFORD, HOW & CO. 

609 Alworth Building. 



LAKESIDE HOMES 

On upp«r tld* of •treec one block tbore LondiHi 
ro»d. eight rooraa auJ bath, ginne foundation, 
furnace, electric ll«lit. gM Ju kluhen oak 
floors doi'u and maple Tloon np Fine lot 
trees, alirubbery, etc. IMce $5,800. Easy terma. 

STRYKER, M«HLEY « BUCK 



WE WANT YOUR 
INSURANCE 

LOCKER & DONAHUE 

803-4-5-6 Lonsdal* BMc 



FOR STEEL PLAIT LOTS SEE 

STEEL PLANT INVESTMENT CO. 

Oraitnl BUM Bank buUdtng. TaUpboaw. Caln- 
BM. 4U: Ct». S46-X. 

Bttt Uti, Easlatt Prit tt , Uwtst Ttrns 




■ 





HERALD 



20 




May 22, 1913. 



MARINE NEWS 



1 



NEW RECORDS 
BEING MADE 



Shipments From Local Port 

Exceed Those of Last 

Year. 



Customs House Statistics 

Show Big Increase in 

All Lines. 



Customs office ligurea up to May 19 
thl3 >ear. in comparison with those 
during the same period in 1912. show 
that this years shipments from Du- 
luth will be excelled by far the ship- 
ments of last year. 

The total grain shipments from Du- 
luth during April and including May 
18 of this year were 8,06S,470 bushels 

the local 
the cus- 
only to 



in passenger traffic, carrjlns no 
freight. Her passenger capacity Is 
about 620 persons. AVith a length of 
2<«5 feet she has a beam of 47 feet 
and depth of hull of 17 feet. 

While the steamer is practically 
completed, thert remain a few odds 
i.nd ends of finishing to be done and 
her furnishings are yet to be Installed. 
It Is expected she will leave Ecoree 
for Chicago about May 25. She has al- 
ready been chartered to carry a party 
of bankers on her first trip a\-er her 
route, early In June. Capt A. E J'^in- 
8(>n will be master and R. Zeltsch, chief 
tngineer. of the new ship. 

SEAMEN'S UNFON 

PICKS BOSTON. 

Seattle Wash.. May 22 —The seventh 
annual convention of the International 
Seamen's union, which has been in 
ses.><ion here more than a week, ad- 
journed after selecting Boston for the 
1914 convention. The convention de- 
cided to make a vigorous campaign 
for membership In the coming year, in 
expectation of <i large increase in 
American .shipping with the opening 
of the Panama canal. Andrew Fur^" 
seth of San Francisco was re-elected 
president. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

AT SUPERIOR. 



FOND DU LAC INDIANS WILL NOT 

JOIN OSUAKE FEDERATION 

"Insurgents" Suspicious of Conference Held May 6 

and Send Independent Delegates te 

Washington. 



Up to May 19 in 1912 but 
bushels were shipped out of 
harbor. The total figures at 
toms office are completed 
May 19 at the present time. 

In April of last year 1.748.b.l bush- 
els were shipped. In comparison to 
2 923 0S4 bushels during April tnis 
vear. From Mav 1 to May 19 of last 
year 4.0;U 967 bushels were shipped, 
while during the same period this year 
6.14&.3S*; were shipped. 

The ore shipments show that tnis 
years total Is almost twice as large 
as that of last year. I'p to May 19 tins 
year SbS.SoO tons of ore was shjpped 
out of Duluth. while last yt-ar 0-2.9.3 
tons were shipped. In April this year 
158,200 tons were shipped ana lasi 
year 18.055 tons. 

The total flour shipments this > ear 
exceed those of last year by 90.110 
barrels. This year 116,460 barrels In 
comparison with 26,350 barrels last 
vear. were shipped out of the .local 
harbor. In April. 1912. 13.000 barrels 
were shipped and In April of thls^ year 
35.960 barrels were shipped. Vp to 
Mav 19 of last vear 13.3^0 barrels were 
shipped, while' 80.500 barrels were 
shipped this year. 

Up to May 19 this year 331 tons of 
merchandise was shlnped out of pu- 
luth. while during the same time last 
year 329 tons were shipped These 
totals are very close, but Indications 
at present show that this year s ship- 
ments will far exceed those of last 
vear In April of last year 68 tons were 
shipped and this year 57 tons. Dur- 
ing Mav of last year 2bl tons were 
sent out. while 27 4 tons were shipped 

The above figures all show that this 
sea-'on's shipments out of Duluth will 
nroVablv es^tablish new records. In- 
, ' -."s point to a banner year for 

t. \\ port. 

FOR PROTECtTON OF 
VESSEL BROKERS 

Steps Taken to Avoid De- 
lays Caused By Sample 
Grain Cargoes. 

Owing to the delays at the Eastern 
^ Ml elevators, brokers at Lake Su- 
,or ports have had considerable 
trouble with sample grain cargoes and 
«s a result, are now threatened with 
^..ral lawsuits To offset this sit- 
uatl/^iNnthrfiture. the following 1^ 

i.r is being sent out to ail f'^PP*^';? 
W- the Toi^ilinson company. Standard 
.^hipping company, G. W . Htad ana 

^'" Xs'^vesse^brokers. we have had con- 
figurable trouble with the owners of 
vlsVels which we have chartered, on 
account of dedays loading sample grain, 
some of us are now threatened with 
lawsuits for collection of damages. 
Koats are also complaining about the 
hniu of sample grain causing a short 

V'lVi rtructS'ly" compelled to noUty 
"'So!>''anv''°u!u'r?"con.ract, for car- 

rX&nY;e\0?{a.^__Oa,s--:CW. 

grain of any «'"^* ^^ontracts or char- 
-.?, ;Z ".P^y.3.o^,^%o„ compan. 

'••-"£r»T'>;.h''er'.Sa°Se7'ii;: 

completes lo"a'"^.h'aJ "apacity. shlp- 
bufhels or le"?.^"."*^",' ^„f „„re than 

exceed twen- 



TonV-r 'car7o".fflaV. excepted If 
J-levalors not l oading.) 

TRIAL TRIP IS SUCCESS. 



The Northwestern Fuel company of 
Superior is building the biggest and 
most improved coal handling bridge 
In the world. The length of the bridge 
will be 710 feet and the highest point 
with the boom raised 160 feet in the 
air. The total weight of the bridge 
will be 1.600 tons. 

The first ten-ton bucket and 
est at the Head of the Lakes 
be installed. The capacity of 
bridge will be 560 net tons per 
unloaded from boat to dock. 



larg- 

v.ill 

the 

hour 
The 



bridge Is mounted on wheels and op- 
erated by electricity. 

The United States government en- 
gineers have started their ninth sea- 
son's work on the $2,000,000 improve- 
ments to the Superior natural entry. 
It is expected this work will be com- 
pleted next year. 

The Pittsburg Coal company is 
spending $500,000 on its Superior dock. 
The plant is being thoroughly over- 
hauled and new equipment Installed. 
When completed it will be electrically 
operated and compare with some of 
the bigger docks at the Head of the 
Lakes. 



SHORTAGE OF MEN 

HANDICAPS MINES. 




REPUBLICANS 
PLAyATTLE 

Will Initiate Democratic Or- 
ganization for the 1914 
Campaign. 

Gallinger Is Made Head of 

Committee to Represent 

Senate. 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 

From Pages 21 and 22 



The European war continues to 
greatly affect the mining Industry m 
this country, especially on the Mesaba 
range, and is handicapping the oie 
shipping Industry. ^ , , „♦ 

When the war In Europe started last 
year hundreds of Bulgarians, Monte- 
negrins and Servians left the range to 
take part. As a result the mines have 
been hampered ever since through a 
lack of help. , . ■.■ ^ 

With the mines under this handicap, 
the ore movement Is delayed. Since 
the opening of the season the stocK 
piles have been reduced considerably, 
and as soon as the shipping is de- 
pendent on mining operations entirely 
the delays may be even more notice- 
able. 

^ ^ 

Fast Trip to Lorain. 

Lorain Ohio. Mav 22.— The steamer 
James H. Farrell, which arrived at 
this port this morning, made a record 
trip from the upper lakes. She made 
the trip from the pier at Duluth to 
the pier at Ix>rain In seventy hours 
and twentv minutes. Forty hours from 
the Soo is considered a good run. The 
Farrell made this part of the run 
In thirty-seven hours. She carried 11.- 
400 tons of ore for the National Tube 
company docks. 



CHIEF MIKE DIVER. JOSEPH NORTHRUP. REV. F. H. PEQUETTE. 

1 the representatives elected at the con- 
ference held in Cass Lake. 



Washington. May 22.— Republican 
senators at a conference today ap- 
pointed a committee of five to confer 
with members of the house on the ad- 
visability of an early Joint caucus to 
organize a congressional campaign 
committee, establish headquarters and 
organize for the coming congressional 
campaign. The senators named were 
Gallinger, Townsend, Norris, Jones and 
Clark of Wyoming. 

Senator Gallinger presided at the 
conference, which was attended by 
thirty senators, among them Senators 
Cummins. Sherman and Norris. Pro- 
gressive Republicans. 

It was the prevailing opinion that 
the campaign to elect a Republican 
congress in 1914 should begin at once, 
and that the campaign committee 
should be composed of representatives 
itnd senators, the plan already adopted 
by the Democrats at the suggestion of 
President Wilson. 

Will Open Headquariern. 
The conference also developed the 
unanimous opinion that publicity head- 
quarters should be opened and the 
campaign committee formed at once. 
It was planned to call the joint caucus 
next week. , 

There was discussion of the action 
of the Democrats in cancelling pairs 
for executive sessions, and it was de- 
cided that each Republican senator 
should take care of his own case. 

The conciliation committee of Pro- 
gressive Republicans named by Senator 
Sherman as a result of the recent Chi- 
cago conference to urge a national con- 
vention next fall, will meet here to- 
morrow to plan for the meeting of the 
national executive committee here 
Saturday. , , r^ ^ 

Senator Cummins, Jones and <-»aY,^ 
ford and Representative Crampton will 
act for the conciliation committee and 
decide how to lay the action of the 
Chicago conference before the execu- 
tive committee. 



t CONSULT WITH F. 1. SALTER * 
S COMPANY, * 

2 803 Lonsdale Building, * 

I If you are thinking of borrowing * 
* money on real estate securltv. They * 
I are always in funds an<f Kra^^ * 
^ every courtesy to their cl enta. * 
i Building Loans a Specialty. « 

S5nEY TO LOAN ON FARM AND 
city property. Any amount from J600 
up.^ ^No delay. Efficient service. 
W m. C. Sargent, 208 Exchange bldg^ 

CASH ON HAND TO LOAN ON CITY 
and farm property, anv a";^""^' i^^e 
est rates, no delay. Northern Title 
Co., C13 First National Ban k bldg. 

City and village loans In Minnesota. Re- 
pay loan monthly; easy terms. C. A. 
Kn"lppf-nb<rg. 300 Alworth. 'Phone 597^ 



MONKV TO LOAN ON FIRST MOR-T 
gage. Prompt service given. J. D- 
Howard & C o., Providenc e building. 

WANTED TO BORROW— »2.500 ON IM- 
proved Duluth property worth »7,o00. 
No commlBBlon. Address K 849. 



AirrO^&J/IOTmCYCLES. 

FOR SAI^— BY OWNER— AMERICAN 
Roadster, 1909 model, 40-horBe pow- 
er, equlpintnt complete, prestollght 
tank, speedometer, etc., electric 
lights, bosch magneto; car In good 
running condition; also has attach- 
able tonneau with top; car cost* 
complete, $4,000; will sell same at 
best offer over $L00. Address Owner, 
W. I. Fleck. Lumber Exchange, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 

THE YALE MOTOR- 
CYCLE. For demon- 
stration of this world 
wide favorite call on 
us or write us; we 
are exclusive agents 
In this territory. The Yale Is the mo- 
torcycle you will buy after comparing 
with others. Quayle-L arsen Hdw. CO. 

EXCELSIOR 
MOTOR CYCLfclS. 
The world's best 
machine, built for 
service and speed. 
Ask K ELL BY 
HARDWARE CO., 




MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
timber and farm lands. John y. A. 
Crosby. 205 Palladio building 




MONEY ON HAND TO LOAN ON FIRST 
mortgages. See N. J Upham com- 
pany, Pro vidence building. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON IMPROVED 
real estate security. Address Room A, 
La Sal le hotel. . 

sToTto'lOAN on CITY PROPERTY-- 
Flrst mortgage only. Address. A 811, 
Herald. 

LOANS on improved farms city loans, 
insurance. W. B. Roe. 414 Prov. bldg 



FOR SALE— HERE IS A BARGAIN, 
one 1910 Model K Chalmers five-pas- 
senger car in excellent condition; 
complete equipment for sale quick. 
1650. Elec. Serv. & Rep. Co., 922 
Ea st Superior street. ^ 

A JOB LOT OF SECOND-HAND TIRES 
for sale cheap. The Duluth Auto 
Supply Co., tire repairing experts, 
412-14 E. Superior St. Zenith 2163; 
Melrose 4102. F. W. Newman. Mgr. 



Monev to loan— Low rates; no delay. 
Duluth Realty Co.. 1st National bldg. 



Money to loan— any amourit; low rates. 
Cooley & UnderhlU. 209 Exchange. 



Fond du Lac Indians refuse to rec- 
-•gnize the conference of Minnesota 
Indians held May 6 at Cass Lake, and 
they have held an independent con- 
vention, electing representatives to go 
to Washington and deal directly with 
the commissioner of Indian affairs in 
regard to preparing a new enrollment 
(>f the reservation. 

The three delegates, Chief Mike 
: Iver, Joseph Xorthrup and Rev F. H. 
Poquette, arrived in Duluth today on 
their way to Washington. , , . . 

Mr. Northrup is a former student at 
Carlisle university. . 

-The chief points which we will 
take up," said Mr. Northrup, "are the 
allotting of the unallotted land and 
the making of a new enrollment. There 
are manv Indians on the reservation 
who are not on the present enrollment 
and who are entitled to the benefits 
accruing members of the reservation. 
We prefer to take these matters up 
directly with the commissioner of In- 
dian affairs than to deal through 



SITUATION WANTED. 

MALE. 

SITUATION WANTED— ALL-AROUND 
^ printer wishes position on country 
weekly in Minnesota; capable of tak- 
ing full charge if necessary, many 
yetrs- experience. Address V 661. 
Herald. 



Get a demonstration of the Indian mo- 
torcycle and compare Its perform- 
ance with any other. Walter Holm- 
berg, agent. 109 E. First St. Duluth. 

BEFORE YOU BUY. INVESTIGATB 
the Henderson motorcycle; catalogue 
upon request. Bplndler Bros., agent^ 
623 Fourth avenue eas t. Grand 1870- x. 

FOR SALE— ALL lUNDS OF TIRES. 
G & J., U. S., Goodyear and Mlchclln. 
Duluth Auto Tire Repair Co.. 3i!8 E3. 
Superio r St. Mel. 776: Grand 93». 

FOR SALE— WINTON 6-CYLINDER, 
7-passenger car; tine condition; a 
bargain; easy terms. Apply l6ll East 
Second st reet. ^ 

EXPERT MOTORCYCLE AND GAS 
engine repair work. Central Repair 
shop. 116 W. Mich. St. Grand 2369-y. 



Big Ore Fleet. 



The congestion at the ore docks has 
been greatlv relieved since yesterday 
morning aiid normal shipments are 
now reported. 

Since yesterdav noon seventeen 
boats left the local harbor with ore 
loads. 



•The Cass Lake conference was sup 
po«ed to represent all the Indians in 
Minnesota. They are all Chippewas 
and while we are Chippewas also, we 
b.lieve we can get better results b> 
working independently." 

The conference at which the three 
delegates to Washington were elected 
was held at Sawyer on May 20. at 
which time the following resolution 
was passed: . 

"Whereas, a great deiil of apprehen- 
sion is felt by members of this council 
that persons not members of said banc 
of India.is seem to be taking undue In- 
terest in the affairs of this reservation, 
and for the Informaticn of the Hon. 
Commissioner of Indian Affairs. It is 
hereby resolved that a delegation of 
three bo chosen and eir powered to act 
for said Fond du Lac Indians, and said 
delegation is hereby instructed to Pro- 
ceed at once to Waslilcgton and there 
acquaint the Hon. Commissioner of In- 
dian Affairs with the true state of af- 
fairs on the lond du Lac reservation 
in Minnesota." 



Coal Is Scarce. 



Cleveland, May 22.— Coal is growing 
scarce at the lower lake docks. Ship- 
pers have pretty well cleaned up ev- 
erything that can go into large ships. 
The coal Is not coming In very fast 
and the tonnage that has been loaded 
since the opening has been extraor- 
dinarily large. The car shortage is 
acute and until the cars that have 
been unloaded return, coal will not 
be plentiful. * There were not so many 
ships lined up for the coal docks yes- 
terday and today. 



maker, Bessemer. Holley. Clyde. Sam 
uel Mather. Augustus George Stephen 
Kon W. J. blcott, C. 6. Jenkins. Jariies 
r Wallace. J. H. Reed. Moses Taylor, 
Peter Relss Svlvania, Taurus, M- A. 
Bradlev, ore; Juniata, Lakewood Su- 
perior Allegheny, merchandise; Majoi, 
Charles Beatty, Park Foster, grain; 
Pre«?que Isle. <Mty of Bangor, Meacham, 
Aztec. Brightie, light; Niko, Helvetia, 
lumber. 



ALONG THE LAKES 



age, fair of complexion 
was garbed as a woods 

Another unidentified 
in a ditch on the Atla 
Atlantic, Wednesday, 
scious but near death ' 
had a bad gash In his 
taken to St. Joseph's 
cock. A theory of h 
and attempted murder 
in this case. 



light liair. and 
man. 

man was found 
ntlc road, near 
He was uncon- 
vhen found and 
head. He was 
hospital. Han- 
ghway robbery 
.8 held by many 



Passed Detroit. 

Detroit, Mich.. May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Up: Agasslz. 12.10 p. m. 
Wednesday; W. L. King, W Issahickon 
12:20; Zillah. Peshtlgo, 12:40; p. O. 
Mills. 12:45; Tuscarora. 1:35; L K. 
Davidson, 2; W. Scranton. 2:30; C. Hub- 
hard 4:10: Odahah, 4:40: Gratwlck. 5: 
Fisher. 5:20; Wade, 5:50: Mcintosh, 6:4^; 
Sahara. Walsh, 9:30: McWilliams. 10; 
Dinkey 10:20- Mary Elphlcke. Imperial, 
barge, 11:15: .Saxona, 12:15 a. ni. 
Thursday: Shaughnessey. 1:40: Castle. 
Rhodes, (big) Livingstone, 2:40; Mor- 
gan 3; Graham. 3:15; Robert Wallace, 
4-40: Dan Hanna. 5:30: Harvard, i:10: 
Colonel 8: Cole, House. 8:40; Raiilng- 
ton 9:40: Hemlock, Reis, 10:20; Wilbert 
Smith, 11; Congdon, 11:20; Ward Ames. 

"°Down: B. F. .Tones. 12:20 p. m. 
Wednesday: Hill, 12:45; Edenborn 1; 
Bufflngton. 2; H. H. Hanna. 2:10; Mil- 
waukee 2:30: Mlnnetonka, 2:3a; Re- 
public. 2:45: steamer Goulder. 4:20; Co- 
dorus. 4:30: Frlck. 4:45; Kennedy. 5:30; 
Sheadle, 5:55; W. L Brown. 6:20: 
Phipps 7; Wascamaw, Castalia. 10; 
Kerr, midnight: Ontario. 12:30 am. 
Thursday; Curtiss, barge, 1:30; Nor- 
manla Western, Maruha. 3; Choctaw. 
715- Huron. Wyandotte, 8:40; Tlonga, 
9- Hydraus, Lynch. 9:20: Kensington. 
oUo- Bransford. 10; Milinokett, Pen- 
dennis White. Buell. Bope. Verona. 
10:30: Angellne. 11:50; Stewart. W. L. 
Fitzgerald, noon. 



The Premier, a large. steel, sea- 
going tug. arrived Tuesday at Midland 
to go Into lake service for the Mid- 
land Towing & Wrecking company. She 
will be used as a wrecking tug. 

A Pile driver is making repairs 
to the McGlbbon dock at Port Huron 
which was smashed last summer by a 
steamer. 

Midland Ont..* May 2*2.— The steamer 
Ionic of tile Northern Navigation com- 
panv arrived here yesterday to receive 
new boilers. 



Railroads 



Sault Passages. 



Steamer North American Shows Good 
Speed on Initial Trial. 

Detroit. Mich.. May 22.-Gratlfylng to 
owners and builders alike was the 
showing made by the new passenger 
«teim.r North American, which was 
iWlTher buUder-s trial trip Tuesday 
morning from the E-orse yard of the 
arc ^t Lakes Engineering works, where 
Sew.^s built for the Chicago. Duluth 
& Georgian Bay Transportation com- 

^^\fter leaving the shipyard with rep- 

\,tativf.q of her owners and the 

;^tpCSffinl co'mSany as practically 

''■;: c^"uls.^^u;Th7 rU^^^ t^o-r JofnT bV: 
[ow Bele isl'e. where she turned for 
th7 return trip, which was ex ended a 
considerable distance out into Lake 

'^'n« her trip Into Lake Erie the 
steTmer is reported to have shown a 
M.eed of about seventeen mjles an hour. 
Her builders anticipate that the new 
tvor of quadruple expansion engine, 
with which the steamer Is equipped 
will enable her to maintain a speed of 
fifteen miles an hour on her regular 
route between Chicago, Georgian bay 
Dorts and Duluth. over which she is 
scheduled to make a rmind trip In 
•even days, with stops at Mackinac isl- 
and Colllngwood. Sault Ste. Marie. 
Fort William and Milwaukee. 

The steamer Is to be used exclusively 



Sault Ste. Marie. Mich., May 22.— 
^Special to The Herald.)— Up. Kee- 
watln noon Wednesday: W. H. Mack, 
1-30 p. m.; Holden. Buffalo, J:30: Indus. 
4-30' Colgate. Ream. 5:30; Monroe 
sinith 6:30- (small> I>avldson. 7; Me- 
rida Lackawanna .Santiago. 8; Samuel 
Morse Nasmyth. Briton. Marcla, 10:30: 
Snyder. Jr., midnight: Hoover, 1:30 a. m. 
Thursdav; James Davidson. 2:30: Shel- 
don Parks. Gary. 4: Widlar, 4:30;_.Tay 
Morse 5- Dalton. 6: Denmark. cSO; 
Lakeland. 8; North Wind. 8:30; Matoa. 
9: Matthews. 9:30; Cipheus, 10; Squire, 

Down- Kamlnistlqua. Dunham, noon 
Wednesday- Westmount. 12:30 p. ni-: 
Yates 1: Perkins. 2:.T0; Norway. Not- 
tingham 3; Alex Thompson. 4; Parent, 
Mataafa 5; Midland Prince. 5:30: Watt, 
r^rltz Cowle. Emma Thompson. 6:30; 
Hamiltonlan, E. L. Wallace. 7:30: Mari- 
copa Brvn Wawr. Strathcona. 8; Cyg- 
nus ' Hotcher, 9:30: Mariposa, whale- 
hack Black. 10: Truesdale, 11; Gil- 
bert' 11:30: Midland Queen, midnight; 
Murphv. 1:30 a. m. Thursday; German. 
Jenny. 3. Calm and foggy. 



TRAINMEN TALK 

OF COMPENSATION. 

San Francisco, Cal.. May 22.— At this 
morning's session of the conv-ention of 
the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, 
the question of a Federal workmen s 
compensation law was taken up. it is 
to be decided at this meeting whetuer 
a compulsory compensation law or an 
optional one Is desired ^V the organ- 
ization, and when a decision is 
reached, it Is said. It will be PJaced In 
the hands of the executive committee 
to be laid before congress. 

Immense Mileage. 

The annual record of the transporta- 
tion lines of the P*^""'?>'l^'^'}'^.r^"Jo''ws 
system has just been >«fued I]/ho^s 
that the company now has 11.644 miles 
of line and 25695 miles of track. There 
are EOi^e 100,000 shareholders inter- 
ested in these lines, or nearly four for 
every mile of trackage. 

A compilation shows t^'\t -J^'^.^^f- 
tem paid out last year |1S8,. 49.312 in 
wages or $7,346 for every mile of 
Track.' and that there are more than 
fight employes for every mile. 



Seek Dissolution. 



Port of Duluth, 



Arrivals — Rockefeller. Marsala. Cor- 
nelius, Saunders, Laughlin, Bessemer. 
Hollev H. H. Rogers, light for ore; C. 
F Moil Griffin. L. C. Smith, Victory. 
Wainwflpht, coal; Follette A M Pe- 
terson, light for lumber; J. Spalding, 
merchandise. 

Departures — John Smeaton, Schoon- 



San Francisco, Cal., ^^^y 22.-Will- 
iam Sproule, president and ^^ • F. Her- 
T-in V C Calvin and L. u. .\ic« oi 
mkk vice presidents of the Southern 
Pacific left last night for New York 
to atund another conference w th 
Union Pacific officials on the dissolu- 
Hnr, of the inerger existing between 
ke Southern pfcitic and Union Pacific 
ordered by the supreme court of the 
United States^ ^ 

TWO UNKNOWN DEAD. 

Houghton County, Mich., Authorities 
Have Cases to Sift. 

Houghton. Mich.. May 22.— ^Special 
to The Herald.)— Apparently smothered 
to death after falling, face downward 
in the soft mud. the body of an un- 
dentified man was found yesterday on 
♦ *,» P-lradlse road, near Chassell vll- 
iJ^e The body Is held at the Krell- 
wutmorlue. Houghton, for Identlflca- 
Uon The man was about 40 years of 



JURY SPENDS 

NIGHT ON CASE 

No Verdict in Personal In- 
jury Suit HsiS Been 
Reached. 

Up to a late hour this afternoon, no 
verdict had been reached by the jury 
in the personal injury action which 
Fred Eggers brought In district court 
against the National Candy company 
and others. In which he asked $10,000 
damages for the beneiit of his 4-year- 
old son, Ravmond, and 11.200 to offset 
the loss of the boys services. 

The claim made in toth cases, whlcn 
were tried jointly before the same Jury, 
was that the boy hafd been left a crip- 
ple as a result of having been run over 
bv a delivery truck. The jury took the 
ca«e at 5 o'clock If st evening and 
spent the night deliberating on the is- 
sues. ^ 

UPPERPENINSULA 

YEOMEN IN REVOLT. 

Republic, Mich.. May 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — As a result of a bitter 
feeling developed between the Upper 
Peninsula and Lower Michigan mem- 
bers of the Yeomen of America at the 
state convention of that fraternal or- 
der at Menominee during the winter, 
the lodges north of the Straits will 
Geek a divorce from rhe southern pen- 
insula branch and the establishment of 
a lurlsdictlon of thei- own. Delegates 
will be sent to the national conclave 
at Oklahoma City next month to urge 
the project. It Is proposed either that 
the Upper Peninsula alone or that it 
and Northern Wisconsin be set aside as 
a separate district. 

wants"colorTine 

INJVIAIL service. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, >[ay 22.— A note of 
optimism was sounded by P. J. Schardt 
of Milwaukee, pros dent of the Na- 
tional Railway Mall Clerks' associa- 
tion at its convention here when he 
quoted figures to show that there has 
been a general Increase of salaries for 
the clerks during the last year, and 
that Increases are scheduled for the 
coming fiscal year. He also spoke of 
the race question In the railway mail 
service, and advocated, for the benefit 
'of both white and negro races, some 
method of separating them in their 
working hours. , „ ,, 

The report of the treasurer showed 
that the organization has a substantial 
working balance to its credit. 



PRESBYTERIANS NEAR 
END OF SESSIONS 

Northern Ministers Are 
Directed to Do Evan- 
gelical Work. 

Atlanta, Ga., May 22.— With much of I 
the business attendant upon the Pan- 
Presbyterian Pentecost already dis- 
posed of, commissioners of the North- 
ern Southern and United assemblies 
entered today's sessions determined to 
finish the official program as speedily 
as possible. ,, , , 

While there has been discussion of 
extending the sessions of both the 
United and Southern assemblies, It was 
regarded as probable that today would 
witness the end of the deliberations. 
The program of the Northern assenibly 
extends through tomorrow, the sele-c- 
tion of a meeting place In iyi4 being 
one of the important matters still on 
schedule. ., . . 

Crowded out by routine business 
aeain vesterday, the discussion of 
withdrawal from the Federal Council 
of Churches of Christ in America by 
the Southern assembly, today was one 
of the most interesting features of 
that body's deliberations. 

MuBt Invite Slnnern. 
In proceedings of the Northern as- 
sembly several features developed 
points of unusual Interest. Of pri- 
mary importance was the adoption of a 
resolution directing ministers to make 
a proposal to sinners to accept Christy 
The United assembly decided to erect 
a church In Washington, D. C. to be 
known as the Memorial church and 
dedicated to looking after the interests 
of the United church n »^^ o"«l ^1^ 
fairs. The structure will cost 540 000. 
The standing committee on publica- 
tion and .Sunday school work of the 
Northern assembly, in its report. whiUi 
was approved, recommended simplitica- 
tlon of various lessons and the bring- 
ing of these lessons into harmony with 
Presbyterian doctrine. However as the 
report of a special committee on 
graded Sunday school lessons is yet 
fo be received, there may be other dis- 
positions of these matters. 



SITUATION WANTED— POSITION AS 
Mookkeeoer timekeeper or general 

offi?e work: eight years' experience. 

A ddress Z 679. Herald. 

WANTED — YOUNG HIGH SCHOOL 
^tSIF.t wants office work dt^nng 

vacation. Address J 698. Heraia. 



"for]sai^:^:COWS^_^ 

dls Twenty-fourth avenue west and 
Fo'urleentV street, two ^J^locks from 
Piedmont avenue car line. Grana, 

^OR ^ SALE — MILCH COWS. AND 
^^rses L. Cohen, 327 East Superior 
street. 

_jH0rR|PAIRlNG^_ 



PR1V-\TE HOME BEFORE AND DUR- 
Ing confinement; best of care by pro- 
fessional nurse; babies also cared for. 
Margaret Finkle. Call Melrose 2464. 
214 Ninth avenue east. 



PRIVATE HOME FOR LADIES DUR- 
ing confinement; expert care; Infanta 
cared for. Ida Pearson, M. D., 284 
Harrison avenue. St. Paul. ^ 



PROSPECTIVE MOTHERS WILL FIND 
a pleasant home during confinement 
at Ashland Maternity home, Ashland, 
Wis. Infants care d for. 

MRs! HANSON. GRADUATE MID- 
wlfe; female complaints. 413 Seventh 
avenue east. Ze nith 1226. 

PRIVATE HOME FOR LADIES BE- 
fore and during confinement. Mrs. 
Dr. Gilbert, 565 Mississippi, St. Paul, 
Minn. 



LYDIA LEHTONEN, MIDWIFE. 2406 
W'est Second St. 'Phone Linc oln 476-A. 

Mrs H. Olson, graduate midwife; private 
hospital. 829 N. 5Sth Ave. W. Cole 173. 



terdav fell from his wheel when It 
^tru?k' a rut and Ms 1^^^ -as ^ okei. 
Ho remounted his bic>cie ana p 
three miles to St. H"are ^"". j^g,, 
broken limb was set He v\as taKen 
aome in an automobile. 

IN SOUTH^MERICA. 

Wany Michigan College of Mines 
Graduates Sent There. 

Houghton, Mich., May 22.-(Special 
to The Herald.)-Twenty per cent of 
the graduates of the Michigan College 
of Mines, are employed in South Amer- 
ica and other Spenish speaking coun- 
tries. Another 20 per cent are em- 
ployed in those countries a part of 
the time as representatives of Ameri- 
can firms and are consulting engineers, 
r.tr. These figures throw considerable 
Igkt ^n how vitally the mining pro- 
fession and the mining schools are con- 
nected wMth the commercial future of 

"he United States. ,^«P^<='f"y ,^,^^1^1^ 
of the Panama canal and the fact tnat 
?he United States must hope in the fu- 
ture to carry on a larger Part of her 
commerce with these countries. The 
minlna: college graduates are becom- 
" - thi principal representatives of this 
country m many of the Spanish speak- 
ing countries. 



AGENTS WANTED. 

AGENTS— SOLICITORS WANTED TO 
sell our line of household specialties 
in the city and country towns. Wo 
have no general agents or crew man- 
ageis and can therefore pay the 
highest commission. Call and see us. 
Gately's. 8 East Superior street. 



__JJPHOLSTERII^ 

Furniture. Automobiles, Carriages; rea- 
sonable prices. E. Ott, 112 1st Ave. W. 



DYE WORKS. 




BRAZING. 



C\ST IRON, STEEL. COPPER. BRASS. 
C. F. WlggertB & Son. 410 E. Sup. St. 



HoboeH Love Name. 

Cinclnntal. Ohlo^ May 22.— Officials 
of the Itinerant Workers of Anu'iica 
union, formerly known as the ' Hoboes 
of America." have itent a telegram to 
Rev Peter WvnhoV'?r of New Orleans, 
national treasurer, asking him to re- 
turn to the American Federation of 
Labor a charter V anted them under 
the name of "United Labor union. A 
new charter with tie name Itinerant 
Workers' union (Hoboes of America) 
will be asked from the Federation of 
Labor. 



SUFFRAGE AGITATION 
BOOSTS IMMIGRATION, 

.Johnny Watts, a new bell boy of the 
McKay hotel, has but recently come 
from London. The youth stated that 
on the train that took him and his 
parents from the metropolis of Great 
Britain, there were some 300 other 
Englishmen and their wives leaving 
for the United States and Canada. 
According to the boy, the trouble with 
the suffragettes and their differences 
with the government are driving many 
people to this side of the Atlantic to 
look for new homes. 

Young Watts says the suffrage qufs- 
tlon Is more serious than any on this 
side of the ocean can possibly imagine. 

BROTHER AND SISTER 
INVO LVED IN COURT. 

Sister and brother are pitted against 
each other In a lawsuit which was 
brought to trial before Judge Lesler 
and a Jury In district court this morn- 
ing Mrs S. Cowl of Minneapolis is 
suing her brother, William Simon of 
this city for $500. Two causes of ac- 
tions are stated In her complaint. In 
the first she claims that she gave him 
$300 worth of postage stamps. for 
whish she has never been reimbursed. 
To this he has entered a general denial. 
In the second cause of action she as- 
serts that he was a Joint maker wfth 
one D Ellas In the execution of four 
promissory notes, each for $50, which 
have become due. 

ELOPERS MUSTGO 

BACK TO FRANCE. 

New York, May 22.— Carlos Domln- 
frucz. a ycung Mexican, and Luclenne 
Loprlnce, his 17-year-old Parisian 
sweetheart, must go back to France, 
whence thev eloped. They cannot land 
here and thev cannot go to Mexico 
ritv' as they planned. This was the 
decision of a special board of inquiry 
at Ellis Island. 

The pair arrived here on the steain- 
PhlD Kaiser Wllhclm II. The girl plead- 
ed tearfullv that they be allowed to 
marrv and "come ashore, but the Imml- 
gratlon authorities said no. Both will 
v.« detained at Ellis Island pending the 
departure of the Kaiser Wllhelm II on 
Tuesday next. 



^^JmBER and CUt'^'oVER LAND3 
bought: mortgage loans made. .lohn 
Q. A. Crosby. 305 Palladio bulldlngf. 



I buy standing timber; also cut-over 
lands. Geo. Ruplcy. 612 Lyceum Bldy. 



PedaU Bike With Broken Le». 

Thief River Falls. Minn May 22 — 
Earl Efflnger, 10 years old, while rld- 
iriff- with several companions on bi- 
cycles from this city to St. Hilare yes- 



CITY XOTICE9. 

■ON TRACT WORIv— 

Office of 
Commissioner of Public ^"orks. 
City of Duluth. Minn.. May 22. 1913. 
Sealed bids will be received by the 
Commissioner of Public Works in ami 
for the corporation of the City of Du- 
luth. Minnesota, at his office In said 
city, at ten o'clock a. m., on the third 
day of June, A. D. 1913, for the grad- 
ing surfacing and otherwise improv- 
ing' Robinson street, and the construc- 
tion of a sanitary sewer therein w'th 
outlet. In said city from Fortieth ave- 
nue east to Forty-first avenue east, 
according to plans and specifications 
on file In the office of said conunis- 

'^'*A*^certlfied check for ten per cent 
of the amount of the bid, payable to 
the order of the Treasurer of the City 
of Duluth, must accompany each pro- 

The City reserves the right to reject 
any and all blcs.^^^^ ^^ DULUTH, 

By C. S. PALMER, 

Clerk. 

It. MURCHTSON, _ ^, , 

Commissioner of Public ^orks. 
D. H., May 22. 23. 1913. D .96. 

CONTRACT WORK— 

Office of 
Commissioner of Public Works, 
City of Duluth, Minn., May 22. 1913. 
S -alod bids will be received by the 
Commissioner of Public Works in and 
for the corporation of the City of Du- 
luth. Minnesota, at his office In said 
cltv at ten o'clock a. m., on the third 
day of June. A. D. 1913. for the con- 
,-tructlon of a sanitary sewer In the 
alley north of Restormel street In said 
cltv" from Atlantic avenue In Bryant 
addition. First division, to Pacific ave- 
nue thence south In Pacific avenue to 
connect with the sewer In Restormel 
stmt according to plans and specifi- 
cations on file in the office of said 
commissioner. , , , ^ 

\ certified check for ten per cent 
of' the amount of the bid. payable to 
the order of the Treasurer of the City 
of Duluth, must accompany each pro- 

^%he City reserves the right to reject 
any and all blds.^^^ ^^ DULUTH. 

By C. S. PALMER, 

Clerk. 
R MURCHISON. 

Commissioner of Public Works. 
D. H^Ia y 22. 1913. D 797 . 

CONTRACT WORK— 

Office of 
Commissioner of Public Works. 
City of Duluth. Minn.. May 22. 1913. 
Sealed bids will be received by the 
Commissioner of Pu»>]»c Works In and 
for the corporation of the City of Du- 
luth Minnesota, at his office in said 



city, at ten o'clock a. m., on the third 
day of June. A. D. 1913, for the exten- 
sion of the Polk stret-t sewer from the 
point where it now leaves Front street, 
easterly along Front street to the out- 
let sewer in Forty-ninth avenue west 
in said city, according to plans end 
specifications en file in the office ol 
said commissioner. 

A certified check for ten per cent 
of the amount of the bid. payable to 
the order of the Treasurer of the City 
of Duluth. must accompany each pro- 

^^The City reserves the right to reject 
any and all bid^^^^^ ^^ DULUTH. 

By C. S. PALMER, 

Clerk. 
R. MURCHISON, 

Commissioner of Public ^ork». 
D H., May 22, 23, 1913. D .98. 



CONTRACT WORK— 

Office of 
Commissioner of Public "^'orks. 
City of Duluth, Minn.. May, 22, 1918. 
Sealed bids will be received by th« 
Commissioner of Public \\ orks In and 
for the corporation of the City of Du» 
uth. Minnesota, at his office In said 
cUv at Ten o'clock A. M.. on th9 
TMrd day of June. A. D. 1913, for th« 
grading, surfacing and otherwise Im- 
proving Seventh street. In said city, 
from Twenty-third avenue west to 
Twenty-fifth avenue west, according to 
plans and specifications on nle in tno 
office of said Commissioner. 

\ certified check for ten per cent or 

the amount of the bid. payable to th« 

order of the Treasurer of the t ity oi 

Duluth. must accompany each proposal. 

The City reserves the right to rcjvc^ 

any and all bids. .^,,t ,.«..! 

CITY OF DULUTH. 
By C. S. PALMER. 
' Clerk. 

R. MURCHISON. 

Commissioner of Public Works 
D. H., May 22 and 23, 1913. D .99. 

CONTRACT WORK— 

Office of 
Commissioner of Public Works. 
Cltv of Duluth. Minn., May. 22. 1913. 
Staled bids will be received by the 
CommL-^sloner of Public Works In and 
for the corporation of the City of l>u- 
luth. Minnesota, at his office in said 
ritv at Ten o'clock A. M.. on tiie 
Second day of June A. D 1913. for the 
furnishing and clellvering F O. B. 
Duluth. Minnesota, nine hundred seven- 
ty (970) square yards sandstone paving 

blocks. . ^« 

\ certified check for ten per cent or 
the amount of the bid. payable to the 
order of the Treasurer of the City oi 
Duluth. must accompany each proposal. 
The City reserves the right to rejew* 
any and all bids. „-,u 

* CITY OF DULUTH. 

By C. S. PALMER. 

Clerk. 

R. MURCHISON, ^ , 

Commissioner of Public Works 
D H., May 22 and 23. 1913. D 800. 







v^ 





Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 22, 1913. 



21 



One Cent a Word Kaoh Insertion. 
No Adverti.seuient Less Than 15 Cents, 

farmTnTfruItTandIJ 

SELECT FARM L.\NDS FOU SALE. 



40 acres 5 mJle^ from Two Harbors on 
county road; J14 per acre, at ?10 down 
and $10 P^r month. 

SO acres 5 miles out on the Rice Lake 
road, 17 acres cl<>i\r; JJO per acre. 

10 acres In 10-acre district near Jean 
Duluth farm; |500. 



160 acres In section R. township 85, 
rannrt^ 14. half mineral rights; |6 por 
acre. 



82 acres Itfc miles southwest of Aitkin, 
on lake shore, lialf mineral rights; 
|20 yer acre. 



Farms at Cromwell. Right, Tamarack. 
Iron Juuction. Dinham, llutledge. 



Bralnerd. Improved; stock included; 
70 acres clear; |26 per acre; milk 
revenue |50 per month, half mineral 
Tishli. 



McN^AUGHTON REALTY CO., 
2022 West Superior St. 



«'*;l-^^t#**ai*'?iNf-*^iNf'#.r^c^*#*i¥'Vf # 



FOR SALE. 



80 acres near Jean Dulutli farm; -^ 
some cleared, with fruit trees ■¥■ 
ani shrubbery; a 3nai>. "^ 

if- 



40 acrea: 6 cleared; erood house 
and barn; will trade for city 
property. 

GRAND AVENUE AGENCY. 
Corner 5oth and Grand Ave. W. 



*?'^(W?«^J'^?'i!M?^*^^*^*^J^-^^^^*^VLi'# 



The best section of land in this county 
Is section lG-51-16, all conveniences 
and cheap. Easy terms. 



Best farm lands in thl-j state, midway 
between St. Paul and Duluth. All 
conveniences. Long time payments; 
low intiSteat. 



£00 acres, six miles to city limits of 
Duluth; main road corners; school on 
land. Good timber. You never saw 
better soil. 



MINNESOTA LAND & IMMIGR.VTION 

COMPANY. 

701 Torrey Building:. 

FOR .SALE— A LIMITED ACREAGE 
of choice dairy and agricultural 
lands near the stations of Alborn. 
Payn-;. Kelsey. Wallace and Zim is 
now being placed on the market, 
size of tracts and terms to suit pur- 
ch:i.<*>^r. For prices and further in- 
foimation. write or call on L. B. 
Arnold, land i ommissioner D. & I. R. 
R. R. Co. llij VV'olvin building, Du- 
luth, Minnesota. 



BAYFIt:LD ORCH.\RD LANDS. 
Lar^-^ or small tracts and improved 
orcliards; prices right; easy terms. We 
have 13.000 acres in the Cornucopia 
and Squaw Bay district. 



C A KNIPPENBERG. 
300 Alworth Bldg. 'Phones 597. 



FOR .SALE— CALIFORNIA LANDS FOR 

settlers and investors, on easy terms; 
alf:ilfa and fruit lands, with abund- 
ance of water, at $75 to $150 per acre; 
close to good markets; full informa- 
tion freelv given. Write T. B. Mc- 
MuTiUs & don, Bdkersfield, Cal. 



FOR SALP:— WLSCONSIN, THE BE.ST 
dairy and general crop state in the 
Union; settlers wanted; will sacrifice 
land prices to get them; ask for 
booklet about Wisconsin Central 
land grant. Address Land Dept., 
Soo Line, Minneapolis, Minn. 



FOR SALE — IMPROVED SECTION 
or half section Richland county. 
North Dakota; 160 or 80. Sawyer 
county, Wisconsin; 80, Kitson coun- 
ty, Minnesota; ail near town; easy 
terms. Henry Ames. Wyndmere, N. D. 

FOR SALE OR TRADE— TWO VERY 
fine farms In Carlton county, one on a 
beautiful lake; each modern and well 
stui ked; best of soil and location; 
prires $4,000 and $4,500 without stock. 
(W 1) (D I> Whitnev Wall company. 



FOP. SALE— I BUY, SELL AND E»X- 
chatige farm, mineral and timber 
lands and d^-al in city prop-rty. Im- 
proved and unimproved farm land 
for sale on easy terras. Barney Edon. 
407 Manhattan building. 



FOR SALE — 80 ACRES NEAR THE 
' sit** purchased by the county for a 

work farm; Pike Lake road runs 

right through it. $25 per acre. 

Little & Noite company. Exchange 

building. 

FOR SALE— 120 Ai^RES I.\ S^/i OF 
section 21, township 60, range 19. St. 
Louis county, Minn.; $25 per acre; 
one-half of minerals reserved. Min- 
eral I-and. Box 512. Little Falls. Minn. 



FOR SALE — FORTY ACRES GOOD 
land, cheap; half mile from .station, 
on good roads. Address Box 73, 
•yVright. Min n. 

JFOR SALE — 160 ACRE F.\RM NI^TaR 
Barnum or will trade for city prop- 
erty. Address Rear, 5613 Grand ave- 
nue. 



Farm Lands at wholesale price.s. L. A. 
Larsen Co.. 214 Providence building. 



MINERAL j^^NDS^ 

HERE IS YOUR CHANCE TO M.\.KE 
money. Get in on the mineral belt; 
one-third Interest In 80 acres, town- 
ship 68, range 19; timber on this SO 
worth il.9zO. Mineral any amount. 
Get this now before too late. J. 
Larson, 507 Torrey building. 



DULUTH, MISSABE & NORTHERN" 
RAILWAY. 

Office: 42« We.^t Superior St. 
Phone, 9U9. 



!<««. 



Arrive. 



I Hibbi:i«. rhish jlni. Vlrstiilii. E»»- 1 

•7.40*m ^ iMh. «:oler*«iie. .Shjwtvn fiiuhii. }• *3.2lpm 

I fMniintaln Iron, ♦spatta. tBlwablkJ 

f Hibbliig. CliHhnlm. Sharon 1 

*3.30piii^ (BuUi). VlrKlnU. Eralelh. (-'lO.aiam 

i C'oleralii*. J 

( Virginia, Cook. Kalner, Fort 1 

*7A0qm\ rrar.cea. Port <Vnhur. Bau- } •8.31am 

(. dette, Wam)*.!. Winnipeg J 



•—Dally, r— Daily exi-ept Sunday 



Cafe, Observation Car. Mesaba Range 
Points. Solid Vestibuled Train. Modern 
Sleepers through to Winnipeg. 



THE DULUTH & IRON RANGE 
RAILROAD COMPANY. 



Dtl.lTH— 


Leave. 


ATTiva 


Knt/e River, Two Harbors. 

Tower. Klj. Wiziton 

Aur>ra. Htwablk, McK In- 
lay. Sparia. E»eleth, GU 
bert. Virginia 


• 7:03 a-m. 

•• 3:15 p.m. 

•••Il30».m. 


•♦II :30 a.m. 

• 5:35 p.m. 

•••10:30 p.m. 



♦— Dail.v ••—Dally except Sunday. •♦•—Mixed 
train leaves wiJ arrivea il.iily FiftefiiUi avejiua e&nt 
atailon. 



OULUTH i. NORTHERN MINNESOTA RAILWAY. 
Oflteea. 510 Loatdale Btd«.. Ouluth. 

Trains connect at Knife Klver daily (ei-ept .Sun- 
day) with D. & I. R tralni learlng DuluUi at 7:00 
a. ta . arriving at Dulutli -it 3 35 p. m. Connect at 
Cramer wtt!i «;r>ad MaraLs »ta^ wti«n ruauLiig. 



Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic. 



Leave. 



STATIONjl. 



t7.45am •6.l5»m. 

1 .S0"> 

t8.l2am »6.45pm. 
■ Soo 
t8.20am *i.iivm. 



... Duluth 'lo 

LUia Union Station 
Superior ...'lo 
Line Tukm Station. 



Arrive. 



Arrive 
t7.55pm 
t8.55pm 



S 40am.. 
6.30am. 



f 7 05pm *4.20am. 
t7.45pm *5 OOam. 



. . Superior 
( Union Depot. ) 
Houghton ...til. 

• 'alumet fio. 

lahpeinltig ...»I2. 
Marijuett» ...♦11 
*l0.20am.Saull -Sta. Marie. •5 
•8.00am... Mnureal ... *9 

*S.20fai Boston 'lo. 

Leave. 

t8 05am »8.l5pi«... Mnntraal ...♦10 

1 1 08p TO • 1 0.20am . .^_ New York ... •7 . 

t— Dally oxcai* auiidaj. ♦— Daili^ 



30am t3.40pm 
W*m tS.IOpm 



.50am 1 5 00pm 

Leave. 
OOpm 
1 0pm 
.20am 
30pm 
25pm 

JOpm •8.20pffl 
*8.30am 



^6 20«m 
t5.20affl 



OOam 



OOam 1 1 0.00pm 
15pm tS.SOam 



One C'ont a Word Kaoh In.sprtion. 
No Adverti.st'iiu'Ut Los?^ Than 15 Cents. 

"T6uLfRrANDEGGS^~ 




tour eggs. chicks and 
bri:ei)Inc. stock wanted. 

Hundreds of people In Duluth and 
vicinity who are interested in poultry 
raising will buy eggs, chicks, breeding 
stock. Incubators and feed during the 
present season. Somebody among this 
vast multitude wants wh.at you havg 
for sale. Yuu can reach these buyers 
by inserting an ad in these "want" ad 
columns. 

Tlie Duluth Herald has the greatest 
circulation of any newspaper in Minne- 
sota, outside of the Twin rities. 
RATES ARE LOWEST. 

The cliarges for classified advertis- 
ing in Tlie l>uluth Herald are less per 
thousand circulation than those of any 
other newspaper in Minnesota. 

A "want" ad man will be pleased to 
call on you and give estimatfs as to 
how much space your ad should oc- 
cupy and tile cost. 

;^ FOR SALE. *. 

i(- "FAULTLESS" HOUDAXS. * 

•^ This strain has been egg-bred ^ 
-^ from trapnest records since April, Vt' 

* 1890. I have bred them 21 years H- 
■^ tor great layers and 1- years for # 

* large-size chalk-white eggs. These # 

* fowls are extremely hardy, have ^ 
i(- neither comb nor wattle to freeze. * 
■A- and are the best all-winter layers ■^ 
•^ in open-front coops. "F'aultless" ii 
•^ strain Houdans have won every ■^ 
ii- blue ribbon at New York, Boston, ^ 
•^ Chicago and Philadelphia shows * 
a- for past six years. Eggs and ■^ 
if- stock sold on honor. Send 10 cents i(r 
■fi- for the largest illustrated poultry # 
■^ catalogue ever issued: it tells you Of 
a- how to breed these fowls, which ^ 
"ft average 2aO eggs a year apiece; it O- 
-^ tells you how to net ?3,000 a year # 
'^ from 100 hens. E. F. McAVOY. # 
ir secretary Houdan club, Cambridge, if- 
r(- N. Y. ■» 

CLOSING OUT BREEDING PENS — 
Black and buff Orpingtons, wliite and 
S. L. Wyandottes, barred and white 
Rocks, white and buff i^ghorns, S. S. 
Hamburgs, white Langshans, light 
Brahmas. Hatching eggs from fifteen 
standard breeds, 75c per sitting and 
up. Here is a chance to get purebred 
chickens at about the price of meat. 
Call evenings, or 'phone Lakeside 119 
told 'phone.). W. W. S«ekins. 4517 
Robinson street. 




PRAIRIE STATE 
INCUBATORS 
bring best results. See 
us when you need poul- 
try supplies, egg cases, 
drinking founts, etc. 
Kelley Hdw. Co., Duluth. 



FOR SALE— S. C. WHITE LEGHORN 
f'g'gs, |1 for 13; Jo per 100; white 
IMymouth Rocks. $2 for 15; $8 per 
100. These are special May and June 
discount prices for highest quality 
hatching eggs. Fine breeding Leg- 
horn and Rock cocks and cockerels, 
52.30 to $5; free booklet. Point o' 
Pines Poultry farm. Reserve, Wis, 



FOR SALE — GET YOUR WHITE 
Orpington eggs from the winners of 
first at Duluth 1911, Superior 1912, 
Virginia and Duluth 1913; eggs from 
three pens of these fine winter lay- 
ers, by parcel post, $3 for fifteen. 
Mrs. H. E. Abell. Steven.^ion. Minn. 



"TWIN PORTS CHAMPIONS," S, C. W. 

Leghorns, Crystal White Orpingtons 
bred to lay; winners of 22 first and 
12 second. 1312-1913 leading shows: 
send for prices of eggs and mating 
list. H. J. Hammerbeck, Superior. 
Wis. 



HATCHING EGGS AND STOCK FOR 
sale; Rose Comb, Brown and Single 
Comb White Leghorns. Barred Ply- 
mouth Itocks and Golden Sebright 
Bantams: thoroughbred stock. P. G. 
Gorman. 2501 West First street. 
Lincoln 64-Y. 

FOR SALE— TO MAKE ROOM 
for young stock, ten trios S. C. 
Fihode Island Reds and part- 
ridge Wyandottes, at $5 each. 
J. W. NELSON, 
5 East Superior Street. 

FOR SALE— EGGS FOR HATCHING 
from seven leading varieties: prices 
reasonable; prompt service and sat- 
isfaction guaranteed. Agate Bay 
Poultry Yards. Fred D. W. Thiaa, 
proprietor. Two Harbors. Minn. 

FOR SALE— RHODE ISLAND RED 

eggs. $2 for 15; day-old chicks, 20c. 
Orders taken for hatching chickens 
at 5c an egg or )4 per 100. Mrs. J. 
H. Tomlin. Grand 1292-X; 36 Palmetto 
street. Duluth Heights. 




FOR SALE — FLOCK OF SIXTEEN 
pullets and three cockerels, 100 feet 
of six-foot netting. $3 worth of feed; 
$20 takes the bunch. R. B. Abbott, 
care of Herald, or phone Lakeside, 
183-L. 



HATCHING EGGS from prize-winning 
single comb Buff Orpingtons, rose 
comb White Leghorns; $1.50, %2 per 
15; few cockerels left. Box 122, Two 
Harbors. Minn., Sunny Valley farm. 



FOR SALE— OLSON'S 3. C. W. LEG- 
horn eggs for hatcliing, $1.50 per 15; 
$6 per 100; leading winners at all 
the shows. Buhl Poultry Farm, 
Buhl. Minn. 



FOR SALE— HOUDANS, MOST HARDY 
fowls, constant layers; large, white 
eggs. $1.50 per setting of thirteen. 
J. B. Greenfield, 310 Columbia build- 
ing. 



Poultry supplies, chick reed, small and 
large, cut alfalfa, chick grit, char- 
coal. Northern grown seed catalogue 
free. T. A. Scarlett. 213-15 E. 1st St. 



FOR SALE— HATCHING EGGS. SIN- 
gle comb white Leghorns; winter 
lavers; fifteen eggs, 75c; 100 eggs, 
$4.00. Mrs. Griffith, 4309 London road. 



Prize winning Buff Plymouth Rock«; 
stock and eggs for sale; send for 
catalogue. E. H. Conkey & Son, 522 
Fifth avenue east. Melrose 1784. 



FOR SALE— STOCK AND EGGS FROM 
S. C. thoroughbred Rhode Island 
Red.-?: $1.25 for 16. Dr. F. C. Lee, 2304 
Princeton avenue. Melrose 3909. 



FOR SALE— RHODE ISLAND REDS, 
black Orpington breeding stock 
chiQ^ts. 71S sixth avenue west. 



LOST AND FOUND. 

FOUND— HERE IS A TIP FROM THE 
furniture salesroom.s. 2110-2112 West 
Superior street: When you wish high 
grade furniture and don't want to 
pay retail store prices up town, come 
to us; we have the class of furniture 
you want and the saving la from 
30 to 45 per cent; why certainly, your 
credit is good. Cameron-Johnson- 
Horgan, furniture distributers. 



LOST— WILL PARTY WHO TOOK 
suit box at Wormser hat store Sat- 

• urday evening return same at place 
named and receive his? 



FOUND— THURSDAY, DARK JERSEY 
cow about 2 years old. Ben Moen. R 
F. D. No. 4, Duluth. 



FOUND — LARGE, YELLOW DOG 
Monday. Call Melrose, 5259. 



CHICK 




CHICK! 



F you are going to raise 

chickens this year, now is the 
time to start. The best kinds 
are advertised under heading 
— ''Poultry and Eggs" on this 
want page. 




* EASY PAYMENT HOUSES. ■^i 

* t 

if- $200 cash and rent money buys 5- ^ 

* room cottage. "^ 

« # 

•^ $300 cash and rent money buys 8- -^ 
i^ room house and 2 lots. H- 

# -^ 

# $400 cash and rent money buys 4- ^ 
i^ room house on Fifty-eighth ave- ii- 
ii- nue west. ii- 

^ ■» 

•^ $1,550 buys new 6-room house on H- 

ii- Sixty-third avenue west. * 

^ ^ 

^ $1,000 buys nice 4-room house on vj- 

# Fifty-seventh avenue west. H- 
■^ -j^ 

■* SEE US IF YOU WANT TO H- 

^ BUILD A HOUSE. H- 

^ ^ 

■^ GRAND AVENUE AGENCY. ^ 

;¥- Corner 56th and Grand Ave. W. ^ 

FOR SALE— NICE MODERN HOUSE, 
corner lot, house has 9 rooms, fire- 
place, stone foundation and electric 
light and gas; only $3,600; small 
cash payment and monthly pay- 
ments. 



FOR SALE— COSY FIVE-ROOM MOD- 
ern bungalow, all conveniences ex- 
cept heat: lot 37 Vi by 140 feet; 
stone foundation; $2,300, easy terms. 



DTLITTH REALTY CO., 

608 First National Bank Building. 

W. W. Fenstermacher, Manager. 

ii. Fort SALE. a- 

ii- Five-room house on .Second street. # 

•^ in West end; has big cellar, water, -^ 

■)^ sewer, electric ligiits; 27y2-foot -^ 

'}(• lot; cement sidewalk: beautiful •^ 

# view; $;?00 cash and $25 por month; •^ 

■^ price $2,200. Good location for ^ 

-)^ railroad man. ii- 

if. WESTERN REALTY CO., # 

i^ 1922 West Superior Street. * 

FOR SALE— SIX^ROOM HOUSE AT 
Fond du Lac: suitable for a little sum- 
mer home; lot Is 40 by 120 feet; level 
and a barn In rear. Will sell on 
monthly or quarterly payments, or 
will trade for property in city. Of- 
fers of vacant ground in exchange 
will not be considered. If interested 
call at Silberstein & Bondy store, 
elevator. 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 
JDNJAGES 20 AND 22^ 

_mjSINESS^H/^^ 

FOR SALE— A STOCK OF CLOTHING, 
drygoods and sioes; a well estab- 
lished business in a good lively town: 
a money-makingr proposition; stock 
inventory about $8,000; will sell at a 
discount; store can be had on lease 
If desired; low rent. Inquire at 410 
Lonsdale building, Duluth, Minn. 



BUSINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE— 
Two-story brick, 25 by 60, Lake 
street, Cliisholm, between First and 
Second avenues. Reasons for selling, 
party wishes to leave city. Leased 
for two years and ha.s Income of 
$940 per year. Applv J. K., Lock 
Box 74, Chlsholn 



LPPIV . 

Minn. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE— 
Do you want to purchase the neat- 
est little moving picture theater in 
the state, seatli g 200, located in a 
fast-growing iron range town? If 
interested comnijnlcate with me. C. 
Herbert, Buhl, ^[inn. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE — 
•.Small drygood and cloth'ng business 
In a new booming town. Business 
clears $.300 a mcnth above expenses. 
Good investment. Must sell on ac- 
count of ill health. R 391, Herald. 



BU.SINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE— 
Hardware store; stock. $3,600. The 
only hardware within a radius of 
fifteen miles. Very desirable location. 
Will be sold cheap. Address, J, W. 
Sherry, Ruso, N. D. 



BUSINE.SS CHANCES- FOR SALE— 
Must sell at once, on account of 
sickness, small restaurant, In good 
location, doing good business, or 
would trade for ?ood team of liorses. 
K 690, Herald. 



BUSINESS CHAN 
Hairdresslng p 
cated; establish! 
reason for sell 
taken at once 
aid. 



CES— FOR SALE— 
.rlor, centrally lo- 
■d business: illness 
ing; reasonable if 
Address A 699, Her- 



FOR SALE. 
House at 531 East Sixth street; new and 
thoroughly modern; hot water heat: 
lot 50 by 140; terms; quick action 
necessary. See 

FAY-SCHAU COMPANY. 
Main Floor Providence Bldg. 
Both "phones 24. 

FOR SALE — SPECIAI-r— NEW SIX- 
room dwelling with hardwood floors 
and all cDnvenienc.es. excepting heat, 
near Fortieth avenue west school; 
owner has moved out of city and 's 
making special Inducfment for quick 
sale. Price only $2,100 on easy 
terms. B. F. Schweiger. 201 Ex- 
cha ige building. 



BUSINP^SS CHANC 
Grocery stock 
cash, store and 
combined; good 
6S4, Herald.a 



ES — FOR SALE— 

and fixtures, $325 

light living rooms 

location in city. Z 



VERY GOOD Bl .SINE.SS CHANCE. 
For rent — Restaurant with twenty-five 
rooms in connection. Call 501 West 
Michigan street. W. Goldstein. 



FOR SALE— POOLROOM WITH Fix- 
tures; good location in Cloquet. 
Write John M^Cullough, Cloquet, 
Minn. 



FOR SALE— SARATOGA POOL HALL; 
on account of sickness owner must 
leave town; 514 AVest Superior street. 



FOR RENT— SIX ROOMS OVER 509 
West Superior street. See Max 
Oi eckov-sky, at tills number. 



BUSINESS CHANCE — FOR RENT — 
large l>oarding house. Mrs. Ralston, 
122 East First svreet. 



FOR SALE— FINE 8-ROOM HOME, 
good location. East end; bath room, 
fireplace, furnace, hardwood floors, 
good cellar; about $600 cash, $1,200 
In monthly payments and $2,000 long 
time mortgage. E. D. Field company. 
Exchange building. 



FOR RENT— 3 4 -ROOM HOTEL, 101 E. 
Sup. St. Call 530 Vi W. Superior St. 



PERSONAL 



FOR SALE— SMALL HOUSE; WATER 
and gas in house; lot 50 by 140; nice 
location on corner Thirty-ninth ave- 
nue west and Seventh street: owner 
leaving town; will sell right. Apply 
at once. H. 687, Herald. 



FOR SALE — TWENTY-FIVE HOMES, 
brick and frame. For particulars call 
and see me; these are sold on the 
easy payment plan. McNaughton 
Realty company, 2022 West .Superior 
street. 



FOR SALE— NEW SIX-ROOM MOD- 
ern house at Lakeside; only $300 
cash, balance $30 per month: for par- 
ticulars, see Greenfield Realt^• com- 
pany, 3i0 and 311 Columbia building. 



FOR SALE — ^VERY NICE COTTAGE 
in good location on East Third street; 
five rooms, full basement: a little 
dandy at $2,600. Whitney Wall com- 
pany. (575) 

FOR^SALE— THAT MAN FIDER HAS 
a modern six-room house near Tenth 
avenue east: price $2,900: on easy 
payments. Talk with Elder. 

FOR SALE — FROM OWNER, A MOD- 

ern, seven -room house in Ea.st end; 
price $3,000; easy terms. Melrose 
3856. 

BUYERS. 
If vou want t,o sell or buv property, 
call or write O. G. Olson, 303 Co- 
lumbia building. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER^GOOD BUILD- 
Ing lot and six-room house, In West 
end. Call Melrose 3783, evenings. 

FOR LAKESIDE HOUSES AND LOTS, 

fo to the Greenfield Realty Co. 
10-11 Coiuinbla building. 

FOR SALE— A NE.AT, MODERATE- 
prlced cottage; Park Point; terms to 
suit. J 682, Herald. 

FOR SALE — FIVE-ROOM COTTAGE; 
modern except heat; 1217 East Fourth 

street. 

Guaranteed main springs, $1; watch 
cleaned. $1. Garon Bros.. 213 W. lat. 



PERSONAL — EGYPTIAN BEAUTY 
mask; worn over night; whitens the 
face and makes it fresh, soft and 
velvety; send 2:i cents in stamps; 
money refunded If unsatisfactory. 
Sanitary .Supply company, 742 Center 
street, Stevens Point. Wis. 

PERSONAL— NEW]:.YWEDS -VND OLD- 
erweds can buy higli grade furniture 
from our Dulutti salesrooms much 
below retail store prices and "Ur- 
Credit-OK." Cameron -Johnson -Hor- 
gan, 2110-2112 West Superior street. 

Personal — Ladies — .Vsk your druggist 
for Clilche."3ter Pills, the Diamond 
Brand. For 25 years known as best, 
safest, always sellable. Take no 
other. Chichester Diamond Brand Pills 
are sold by druggists everywhere. 

WANTED— TO BORROW il,000 FROM 
private party; security house and lot 
in city; long tim d loan, or can agree 
to take up loan at any time on thirty 
days* notice. Address J 472, Herald. 

PERSONAL — Get away from washday 
troubles by sending your family wash 
to us; 5c per pou id. Lutes' Laundry, 
808 East Second street. Both 'phones. 



PERSONAL — TRY JEAN SALLAC, 
the new health drink; twice as good 
as buttermilk. ;^old everywhere In 
Duluth or 'phone Melrose. 1128. 



PER.SONAL — LET GEORGE DO IT| 
clean your hat; it will look like new. 
Get your shoes j-hined here, best In 
city. 215 West Superior street. 



Personal — We will announce our new 
location soon, removal sale still go- 
ing on. Twin Port Trunk Co. 21 Lake 
avenue north. 



PERSONAI:, — PUPII.3 WANTED BY 
competent vloHr teacher. Special 
rates for beginners. Cole 327-X. 

MRS. AMANDA SHDGREN WILL CALL 
at your home; gives first-class and 
latest massages. Gr^nd, 2178-D. 

PER.SONAL — WANTED CARE OF 
some lawns. Leave orders 416 ?.]ast 
Seventh street, care of M. V. 

Personal — Comblngii and cut hair made 
Into beautiful switches. Knauf Sisters. 

Personal — Nothing better on earth than 
Barker's for coughs and colds. Boyce's. 

Massage — C^onstipatlon a specialty. Mar- 
garet Nelson. 213 W. Sup. St. Room i. 



One Cent a Word Fach Insertion. 
No Advertl.sement Le.ss Than 15 Cents. 

SALE^MISCELLANEqUSr 

FOR SALE, 
PIANOS AT WHOLESALE PRICES. 



Our wholesale store, 628 Garfield 
avenue, will be open to the general 
public Saturdays until every piano and 
player piano in stock is sold. We take 
.special orders for any styles that may 
be flold out. For the following famous 
well-known makes of pianos and player 
pianos, union make: Bush & Gerts 
marvelous Crown pianos, celebrated 
Chase Bros., famous Hardman. reliable 
Hack ley. lielmore, Concor(*. Bolt wood, 
Carlisle, new $300 pianos, now $150. 
Any wood or finish, as you order. 
Player pianos a specialty. Could you 
possibly find a better assortment of 
pianos to make a selection from? The 
beauty of this sale Is, we sell at whole- 
sale price to you. Write today or call 
.Saturdays. 

KORBY I^ANO CO., 

WHOLESALE STORE, 

628 GARFIELD AVE., DULUTH. 



FOR SALE — MOTION PICTURE MA- 
chineB and stereoptlcons, gas ma- 
cnines; film and slides at half price 
to close out stock; Includes Edison 
Underwrlter.s Type B; also motio- 
graph dissolving outfit and lubin 
optigraph; all ag good as new; 
write quick for detailed description 
and prices. National Employment 
company, Duluth Minn.; established 
1882. 417 West Superior street. 

FOR SALE — BILLIARD AND POOL 
tables, bar and cigar store fixtures, 
also second-hand tallies. Write for 
prices, terms and catalogues. Koili- 
ler & Hlnrichs, St. Paul, manufac- 
turers. Local agent, Joe Appert, resi- 
dence, 1327 London road, Duluth. 



FOR SALE — SEED POTATOES; EARLY 
Bliss Triumphs, Red River Valley 
Ohios, Burbanks and Carmens. Sha- 
piro - Tucker - Faust company, 206 
West Michigan street. 



FOR .SALE — Second-hand woodworking 
machinery, portable sawmills, trans- 
mission appliances, pipes for steam, 
water and furnaces. Duluth Mach- Co. 



For Sale — Northrup King's Northern- 
grown seeds; also garden tools and 
implements; seed catalogue free. 213- 
215 East First street, T. A. Scarlett. 



FOR SALE— GLASSWARE EQUIP- 
ment for soda fountain at bargain 
Call Melrose 1639 between 6:30 and 
7 p. m. 

FOR SALE— CAMERA. 6^^ BY 8*^, 
good lens and two plate holders, very 
cheap. Loyal Photo Studio, West 
Duluth. 

FOR SALE— $225 BUYS A $452 SODA 
fountain, bar. four tables, twenty 
chairs; used one-half season. L. B. C. 
Herald. 



FOR SALE — SOME WELL-BRED 
Scotch Collie pups. H. Gould. Elighth 
avenue west and Tenth street. 



FOR SALE — CHINA CLOSET AND 
medium sized refrigerator; good con- 
dition. Call Grand 1431-Y. 

P"OR SALE— FIVE SHARES' OF PEO- 
ple's Brewing company stock. Ad- 
dress B. A. C. Herald. 

FOR SALE — $50 WILL BUY SECOND- 
hand uprigiit piano; easy terms. V 
394, Herald. 

FOR SALE — SECOND HAND .SAFE. 
See N. J. Upham company, Providence 
building. 

FOR SALE— 100 SHARES CUYUNA- 
Mllle Lacs; $5 per share. E 656, 
Pie raid. 

FOR SALE — GOOD RUBBER TIRED 
buggy; cheap. 4123 West Third 
street. 

FOR SAI.E — FINIi: IMPORTED SING- 
ing canary birds. 107 East Superior 
street. 

For Sale — Edison Indestructible records 
by mall. 50c. Boston Music Co., Dulutli. 

For .Sale — National cash register and 
osteopath outfit. Joe Popkln, 29 W. Ist. 

For sale — Furniture, a few snaps; steel 
springs from $2 up. Boston Music Co. 

FOR SALP: — ONE USED PIANO; $50. 
Boston Music company. 



* * 

a- FOR SALE— ACRES. r,i 

ii- a- 

^ -A- 

'^ # 

i^ Two acres, with city water and iC- 
i^ gas, electric lights and telephone; ^ 
■^ fine soil; view of lake; 6 blocks ^ 
it from street car, at Woodland -fe 

^ CASH $100. ■ *. 

ii- Balance on easy monthly -^i 

^ payments. -^ 

^ A fine property — a money-maker yi- 

f * 

'7^ * 

4t' •^ 

■fi- C. FRANCIS COLMAN, ^ 

"^ 'jl 

•* 421 Manhattan Bldg. -^ 

if- Both 'phones: Melrose 2772; ■^ 

# Grand 2410, ■^ 

FOR SALE. 
Lot, 100 feet, on East Second street, 
between Twenty-fourth and Twenty- 
fifth avenues east; a bargain for a 
quick sale. 

FAY-SCHAr COMPANY, 
Main Floor Providence Bldg. 
Both 'phones 24. 

FOR SALE— $1,100 THREE 50x140 
foot lots at Lakeside with water, 
sewer and gas, all plowed and fer- 
tilized for gardening, splendid soil, 
has small barn. Terms very easy. 
GreenfieJd Realty company, 310-11 
Columbia Bldg. 

FOR SALE— $750 FOR 50x140 FOOT 
lot on the upper side of I^egent 
street near Forty-third avenue east; 
beautiful building spot. Greenfield 
Realty company, 310-11 Columbia 
Bldg. 



FOR SALE— FOUR LOTS AT EIGHTH 
avenue east and Eighth street, cot- 
tage on one lot. Inquire 719 North 
Eighth avenue east. 

FOR S.VLE— $1,500 FOR A SNAP ON 
Jefferson street, 60 by 140 feet. Little 
& Nolte company, Exchange building. 



FOR SALE— LOT 37 1^ BY 140 FEET; 
good location, Lakeside. Inquire at 
5132 Otsego street. 

For Sale — 2V4-acre wooded lot, near 
Woodland. $200. Whitney Wall Co. 



WANTED TO BUY. 



Second-hand furniture and .stoves. Joe 
Popkin, 29 W. First St. Grand 253-X. 



Wanted to Buy — Second-hand furni- 
ture and stoves, llagstrom & Lund- 
quist. 2012 W. Sup. St. Lincoln 447- A 



Wanted to Buy — Second-hand stoves, 
ranges, old ciothe.s, furniture. Lltman 
Bros., 332 E. Sup. St. Both "phones. 



'Phone 1191-Y. S. Gold, 338 E. Sup. St. 
Pays best prices for musical goods, 
cameras, guns, tools, old clothes. 



WANTED TO BUY — SECOND-HAND 
rowboat; must be a bargain. Call 
Melroee 2062. 

WANTED TO BUY — A LARGE OR 
small tract of land for Investment 
I 69, Hf-rald. 



We pay highest prices for second-hand 
furniture. 10 W. 1st St. Grand 1633-X. 

hTpOPKIN BUYS STOVES AND FUR- 
nlture. Grand 2337-A; Melrose 1482. 

WANTED TO BUY — SECOND-HAND 
furniture and stoves. Grand 1665-A. 

WANTED— MEADOW OR HAY LANd! 
R. C. Sanborn & Co., Torrey Bldg. 



BOARD&JROOM^FFERED. 

FOR RENT— STEAM HEATEdIrOOMS 
and board. 122 East First, Latona. 



FOR RENT— ROOM AND BOARD, AT 
210 Weat Second atre«t. 




READY REFERENCE 

¥m Ymn bmu iisos 



This directory is intended for the conven- 
ience of anyone desiring something a lit- 
tle out of the ordinary in their daily needs and requiring 
it in a hurry. The firms represented below make a special- 
ty of immediate service and will gladly furnish any infor- 
mation that is necessary. Remember, satisfaction 
guaranteed by every advertiser. 



is 



JUST USE YOUR TELEPHONE 

i^^ SEE IT IN THE HERALD EVERY DAY 



AWNINGS, TENTS, PACKSACKS. 

POIRIER TENT & AWNING CO.. 413 
East Superior street. Both 'phones- 



DULUTH TENT & AWNING COMPANY. 
Get prices. 1608 W. Superior street. 



ACCOUNTANT. 

MATTE.SON & MACGREGOR, 

PUBLIC ACCOl'NTANTS AND 

AUDITOliS. 

Business Counselors and Systematizers. 

700-701 Alwortli Bldg. 

'Phones: Melrose 4700; Grand 71. 



WILLIAM BUSSELMAN. ACCOUNTANT 
and systcmlzer. 24 Fourth avenue 
east. 'Phone Melrose 3660. 



F. D. HARLOW, 304 EXCHANGE 

building. Telephone. Melrose r.654. 



ADVERTISING NOVELTIES. 

Duluth Badge & Novelty Co., 2022 W. 
Superior St. Badges, banners, but- 
tons, flags, pennants, souvenirs, etc. 



ARCHITECT. 

W. B. Roe. architect and builder, 412 
Providence building. Grand S62. 



ASHES AND GARBAGE. 

REMOVED: ASHES, RUBBISH AND 
manure. Call Grand 1962-A. 



BRAZING. 

STOVE AND FURNACE REP-AIRING. 
Hubert. 18 Third Ave, west. 901-A. 



CONCRETE BLOCKS. 

WE MAKE A FULL LINE OF CE- 
ment blocks for foundations, farm 
buildings, garages and other struc- 
tures; prices on application; we have 
our own side track and ship any- 
where W Duluth Cement Block 
Works company, Fifty-sixth and 
Grand avenues, West Duluth. 



CEMENT BURIAL VAULTS. 

WtTmaNUFACTURE THE NATIONAL 
steel reinforced cement burial 
vaults in three sizes. We crate and 
ship anywhere. Order through un- 
dertakers or direct from us. West 
Duluth Cement Block Works, Fifty- 
si x t h and_C5j;andA_ves^J^^^u^^ 



CARPENTER REPAIR WORK. 

IF Y'OU HAVE CARPENTER WORK 
to be done by day or contract, re- 
pairing or new, call Park 10-A. 



Remodeling, new work and repairing. 
A. S. Page, Lin. 1S5-D. Estimates free. 



Work done neatly. O. Pearson, 207 W. 
First St. Zenith 1274-X, or Park 9<. 



ALL KINDS OF CARPENTER WORK; 
estimates free. Calumet 150-L. 



CARPET CLEANING WORKS. 

INTERSTATE CARPET CX.EANING CO. 
L. Sinoite, Prop., compressed air and 
vacuum cleaners and rug weavers. 
1928 West Michigan St. Both 'phones. 

Carpet and rug cleaning; naptha pro- 
cess. Zenith Dye house. 'Phones 1S88. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Duluth Engineering Co., W. B. Pattnn. 
Mgr., 613 Palladio bldg. Specifications 
prepared and construction superin- 
tended for waterworks, sewerage, etc. 



CLAIRVOYANT-HAIR SPECIALIST. 



MRS. ANNA in Bryant & 
growing parlors, grows 
hair or no pay. 



Co.'s halr- 

a head of 

18- A Lake av. Mel 1145. 



CHIMNEY SWEEPER. 

^^H^'^J^^carthyT^^hmney^ 

furnace cleaner, stack and fiagpola 
painting. Call Park, 39-Y'. 



COLLECTIONS. 

Bills collected hy the American Collec- 
tion & Adjustment Assn. 302 Christie 
building. 



CIVIL ENGINEER AND SURVEYORS 

NlCHOLs'XlFATmELI^^ 

tan Bldg. Anything in engineering. 



CARD ENGRAVING AND STAMPS. 

Consolidated Stamp & Printing Co., 
Barker & Orr, Props., 14 4.th Ave. W. 



CORSETS. 

Spirella corsets, 7 W. Superior St. A 
M. Osborne. Mel. 4479; Grand 2197-Y, 



DANCING ACADEMY. 

COFFIN — 25 Lake avenue north. Either 
•phone. Open afternoon and evening. 

Lynn Dancing academy, lady Instructor. 
"iS-A Lake av. N. Hall for rent. Mt 1 1145 



FLORISTS AND NURSERYMEN. 

Duluth Floral Co., wholesale, retail cat 
flowers; funeral designs. 121 W. Sup. 



For quick service, funeral and wedding 
designs, try Seeklns. 302 E. Sup. St. 



FURNITURE RE-COVERED. 

L^T"Forsc?Pdo"To«^^"'uFW 

334 E. Superior street. Both 'phones. 



GRADING AND SODDING. 

GRADINar'"iODDlN<r'AN^^'"s^ 

Trees, shrubs and plants^ We sell 
and move large trees. Have .trees 
trimmed now. Call Mercer, Melro«e 
6460. 



Black dirt and sandy loam for sale. 
Keedy. Mel. 1390; Grand 1488-X. 



Subscribe for The Herald 



HATS CLEANED. 

Old hats made like new. Panamas 50o 
to 75c; felt and derby, 50c; straw, 28c. 
Wiirk guaranteed. 2K> W. Sup. -rlo r St 

JANITOR AND WWBOW WASHERT 

PUBLIC JANITOR AND WINDOW- 
washer. Prudence Robert, the best 
new window cleaner in tli.* city. Mel 
4196; Grand 2285-Y. 120 Pioneer blk' 



LAWN MOWERS SHARPENED. 

AT STEWART'S REPAIR SlToP^KEY, 
lock and .safe work. 18 North Third 
Av. W. 'Phone Mel. 6386, Grand 991-A 



LANDSCAPE GARDENER. 

Chris Engel. 310 E. 9th St., does prun- 
ing, planting treea. seeding, sodding 
and making over lawns. Grand l'J60-Y. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 




A.Haakonsen.dealer 
and expert repairer 
at J. W. Nelson's, 5 
East Superior .St. 



BOSTON MUSIC CO., MUSICAL MER- 

chandise, 6 and 8 West First street. 



MUSIC LESSONS. 

Violin lessons given at pupils* resl- 
dence. Edward Lynn, Cole 327-X. 



MOVING PICTURE SUPPLIES. 

Motion picture outfits bought and sold. 
-National" Co.. 417 W. Michi^'an St. 



NICKEL PLATING. 

ANYTHING Y'OU H.\VE THAT~NEEDS 
plating or rertnlshing send it to u«. 
Gold, silver, nickel, brass, copper and 
bronze plating, electro galvanizing. 
Duluth Plating &Metallzing Co., 401 1^ 
E. Sup. St. Grand 242; M.:-lr >se 1519 



PATENTS. 

PATENTS — ALL ABOl'T PATENTS. 
Sea Stevens, 610 Sellwood building. 



PAINTING AND PAPERHANGING. 

FOR PAINTING and DECORATING sea 
Youngdahl & Diers, 223 W. 2nd St. 



FOR HOUSE PAINTING AND PAPER- 
hanging, A. Johi.son, Park, 134-.A. 



PAINTING AND TINTING. 

HOUSE PAINTING AND TINTING. Call 
Schultz & Johnson Bros., 519 Weat 
Second street, or Grand 1519-D. 



PRINTING. 



P RINTING SERVICE 

20 East Superior St. ~ 
Enough said — Grand 2104. 



PLUMBING. 

THE SANITARY PLl-MBING CO 'sV 
v^- Rirst St. Plumbing and heating. 



REPAIR SHOP. 

CENTRAL REPAIR SHOP, 209 E SuV 
street — Gas engines, safe work, locks" 
keys, cutlery grinding, motorcycle 
repairing a specialty. Lawn mowers 
sharpened. Grand •-'.'^69- Y Mel C069 



REAL ESTATE. 



L. A. LARSEN Co.. 213 Providence Bldg 
City property, lands, loans, fire Ins! 



RUG WEAVING. 

FIR.ST-CLASS WORK — SILiT'cUr! 
tains a specialty. Melrose 3341. 



SWEDISH MASSAGE. 

A B. HANSON, MASSEUR, 40n^BW 
Jersey Bldg. Old phone, 4273 Melroae. 



GRADUATE MA.SSEUSE, 3)5 FAST 
First street. 'Phone. Grand IZIS-X. 

SOWING MACHINE REPAIR CO.^ 

"'^'^'^Ea"'w?'P0NDrMANAGER 
1122 EAST FIFTH ST 
Melrose, 3641. Grand, 1533-Y 

We do not sell new machines, but we 

correct any troubles and make over old 

ones to be usuklly better than new 

ones. Call us for estimate. 



SAFETY RAZORS SHARPENED. 

Safety razor blades all kindrsharpened 
and put In first-class condition. 30c 
per dozen. Quayle-Larsen Co. 



TRANSFERRING AND STORAGE. 

if- MOVlNCj, PACKING AND TRANS- * 
*i FERRING OF ALL KINDS. -^ 

*. General merchandise and household * 
if- goods stored. Wt? give service ii 
NORTHERN COLD STORAGE & *. 
WAREHOUSE CO, 
Old "phone. Melro.'^e 3590. 
New. Grand 981-A 









if-H'^-^-k-y!-^ ^^^)?-i(>9f-ii'if^i}-^if^i^->;A^-^^i^^'^ 



TYPEWRITERS. 

VISIBLE typewriters" 

Rented 

Three months. $5. 

Rental applied as payment. 

Duluth Typewriter Co., 

319 W. First. Mel. S24S: Grand 2054-Y 



VETERINARY SURGEON. 

J. J. FINDLAY. veterinary surgeon. Of- 
fice, City Wood yard, 115 Second ave- 
nue. W. Office hours S a. m. to 6 p m. 



WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER. 



i CHRIST HAUG, Manufacturing Jeweler 
and watchmarker. 319 W. First St 



DRESSMAKING. 



DRESSMAKING — ALL KINDS OF 
sewing done; prices reasonable, 
piione Cole 14-A 



NEW DRESSMAICING PA RIGORS AT 25 
East Superior street. Melrose 562S. 



FOR RENT— COTTAGES. 

FOR RENT — ON PARK POINT. NICe"- 
ly furnished eight-room cottage, 
modern. Call Melrose 2062. 

FOR RBNT — A DANDY FIVE-ROOM 
cottage near Oatka Beach; reason- 
able. J (82. Herald. 







iSSG 



^ij^Jiy'jgiyii^t.'^ 



'% 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 22, 1913. 



X 



THE 



SATURDAY 
HERALD 



THE SUNDAV PAPER SATURDAY MIGHT 



a 

of 



is refjkte with special features for every mem- 
ber of the family. The Saturday Herald has 
four unexcelled sport pages, best social and 
musical features, interesting automobile gos- 
sip, four pages of neighboring town news 
page of live Northwestern news, a page 
iron range happenings, a page of reliable mm- 
ing and market news. 

The circulation of The Saturday Herald is 
greater by thousands than that of any other 
Saturday or Sunday paper in Minnesota, out- 
side of the Twin Cities. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Thau 15 Cent«. 

HELP^WANTE^FEMALE. 

WANTED — GIULS TO LEARN TO 
sew macklnawB. shirts and overaUs: 
girls can become competent In short 
time and earn good wages. Christen 
sen-Mendenhall-Graham company, 
West First street. 



514 



Wanted — Girls to attend dressmaking 
school; make ganiients for yourself 
or others while learning. Quick, easy 
and perfect. Diplomas to graduates. 
Miss Gray 3rd floor, Geo. A. Gray 



Co. 



/ 



WANTED— A COMPETENT GIHL OR 
middle-aged woman for general 
housework on farm; modern con- 
veniences; wages J20 per month. Mrs. 
P H. Utlev. Wren.shall, Minn. 



One Cent a Word Kiich Insertion. 
No Advertisement Ijbcis Than 15 Cente. 

ADDITIOML WANTS 
JONJ^AGR 2QI AND^ 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Lei*8 Than 15 Cent*. 

FORREiiT^^^FLAT^^ 



W.\J^ITED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
luiusework; two in family; good 
wagfs to a competent girl; refer- 
ences required. Call after J> a. m.. 
22tf East First street. 



W 



ANTEIV-FIRST-CLASS STENOGRA- 
pher of several years' experience; 
salary $60 per month; address, giving 
experience and references, 
Herald. 



L 659, 



WANTED — STRONG, NEAT WOMAN 
to work in small family for room 
and board, can go out part of time 
for other work. Address. E 6^4. 
Herald. 



WANTED 
general 
ploying 
erences. 
east 



—COMPETENT MAID FOR 
housework In family em- 
two maids; please bring ref- 
630 Twenty-fourth avenue 



FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL, 
Duluth's newest and best mod- 
erate-priced hoteL IMreproof; hot 
and cold water In every room. 
Rooms single or en ;juile, with or 
without bath. Speoial rates by 
the week. 
On Corner Opposite Union Depot. 



« FOR RENT. 

•ji^ Four rooms, stove heat, 



central ?16 

?our rooms, steam heat, 

modern 

Six rooms, hot water heat. 

Central 



27.50 
40.00 



MASSACHUSETTS REAL ESTATE 

COMPANY. 

18 Phoenix Block, City. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 



* 






FOR RENT. 



Six rooms, stove heat, cen- 
tral 

Six rooms, Eighth avenue 
east; all modern • 35 

Seven rooms, East Fourth 



120.00 



00 



street; extra 



fine ,35.00 



MASSACHUSETTS REAL ESTATE 

COMPAJJY, 

18 Phoenix Block, City. 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 



A 



4 

PALESTINE LODGE NO, 7f, 
A. F. & A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings flrst and third Monday 
evenings of each month at 
8 o'clock. Next meeting. May 
29, 1913. Work— Third de- 
gree. Hugh U Joyce, W. M.; H. Nesbltt, 
secretary. 

IONIC IX)DGE NO. 186. A. P. 

& A. M. — Regular meeting* 

second and fourth Monday 

evenings of each month at 8 

Next meeting. May 

Work — First degree. 

W. M.; Burr Porter, 




o'clock 
26, 1913. 

Carl E. Lonegren, 

secretary. 



WE FURNISH THREL; ROOMS WITH 
good furniture at a lower cost than 
you are now paying in rent on the 
furniture In your light housekeeping 
suite; small paymen : d"wn, balance 
$1.60 per week. F. S. Kelly Furni- 
ture company, 17-19 W. Superior St. 

FOR RENT — COMFOR'IV^VBLE HOME- 
like rooms, both Uirge and small, 
at very reasonable jrices; $12.50 to 
$5 per week; also one small very 
neat room at |7 oer month. Call at 



310 



per 
THE VERONA, 
West Third Street. 



WANTED — GIRLS TO BRING COMB- 
Ings to Miss Horrlgan's Hair shop, 
Oak Hall building, to be made up In 
switches or braids at small cost. 



WANTED— TWO GIRLS TO SEW 
sacks on machine. Apply L. Karon 
Iron & Metal company. Eighteenth 
avenue west and Itailroad street 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion, 
No AdvtTtl'ioment Less Th»'^\5^^|^[^ 

TELJEPHO N? dFr ECTO RY 

OF 
BUSINESS 

HOUSES. 

Below you will find a 
ondensed list of reliable 
business firms. This is de- 
signed for the convenience 
.f busy people. A telephone 
■ rder to anv one of them 
Ajll receive the same care- 
•il attention as would be 
ivt-n an order placed in 
H rson. You can safely de- 
.. iid upon the reliability 
v£ any one of these firms. 
Old 
'Phone, 

DltVr.filSTS — „^ ^ ,„..o 

r.di'ili^' .loronimus, Ph.G.124« 
DK \'Ti ST^ 

Dr. V. U. Burnett.D.D.S.460g 

LAlMjiRIES — 

I'eerKss I^aundry 428 

Yale Laundry . ./ 4.9 

Lutes Laundry .' 447 

Home Laundry Co 4'8 

Mod.l Laundry 2749 

Trov Laundry -'7 

SIKVf MARKKT— 

Mork Bros 1590 

KFV. LOC li. SAFF. WORK" 

I'ululh Gun shop. . 




One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Adverti>;emcnt Less Than 15 Cents. 

(Continued.) 



iir 



WANTED. 

A salesman of ability; must be a 
hustler; no others need apply. ^V e 
offer a fine opportunity for a man 
who can make good. 

THE MOORE COMPANY', 
319 W. First Street. 



New 
'Phone. 

1072 

909-X 

428 
479 
447 
478 
1302 
267 

189 



.2288-A 3969 



WANTED — SOLICITORS TO SELL OUR 
line of household specialties in the 
city and country towns. We have 
no general agents or crew managers 
and can therefore pay the highest 
commission. Call and see us. 
Gate ly's. 8 East Superior street. 

WANTED— COOK, MAN" OR WOMAN, 
to take charge of kitchen of a 
country hotel. I buy the bread and 
do the plain laundry; potatoes are 
peeled; pay $35 per month and 
room. Write to Mrs. P. Quesnel, 
Bat hgate, N. D. 

LEARN TELEGRAPHY. 
Short hours; big salary; great de- 
mand; railroad wires and expert 
Instructors. Free catalogue. Barry's 
Telegraph Institute, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 



W\NTED — GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework; good wages; house- 
cleaning done. 2015 Ea.st Second 
street. Call Mel rose, 3411. 

WANTED— SEWING GIRLS. DRA- 
pery room; experienced hands pre- 
preferred. Cowan & Zimmerman. 
East Superior street. 



531 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; three In family; no"se 
cleaning done. Mrs. E. D. Edson, :ill 
East Fourth street. 



FOR RENT— TWO OR FOUR ROOMS, 
heated and furnished; gas range, 
electric light, hardv/ood floors and 
all conveniences; o! l.v $16 and $20 
to right party. Call 1030 West First 
street. 



Aiit.)M('--;f^'^vs#^*^^T^-** 1 7^^;g-;^;\^#d-^.^»a;-^-#jg^-^-''^^^^^ 



•^i**>VA:-^-'i&*^'^i^¥***'*^'5^^t^J^^ I 'X-ii-fi^^^ii^X-ii'^S^ii^Xi^'i^i^^ 



FOR RENT. 

Desirable flve-room flat with bath 
at 118 West Fourth street; hard- 
wood fioors throughout; $22.50 per 
month. 

W. C. SHERWOOD & CO., 
118 Manhattan Bldg. 



* 



;Y^-^-;Y^-*'*'^f*W'itT¥#*«'^^»«-»**i^^ 



FOR RENT. 



THE NEW ALEXANDRIA. 
Furnished apartments jiud single rooms, 
with bath or without; private tele- 
plyjne In all rooms; dining room In 
connection. 322 West Second street. 



FOR RENT— A BEAUTIFUL FUR- 
nished room, overlooking lake. 
Tenia avenue east ajid F'.vjnd street. 
One or two ladles pre io .-red. Call 
Melrose 1026. 



WANTED — TWO EXPERIENCED 
general servants; state experience 
and wages and give references. Ap- 
ply T 681, Herald^ _ 

FOR 

two. 

street; 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL 
general housework; family of 
Applv 2219 East Superior 
Melrose 3369. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; family of two: ?^^ Per 
week. Call 106 West Fifth street. 
Fl at C. 

WANTED — MIDDLE-AGED LADY AS 
housekeeper for middle-aged man 
with children. Address, ii. 66.1, 



Herald. 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; good wages; 
housecleanlng done. 2725 East bixth 
street. 



WWTED — MAID FOR SECOND 
work; two in family; best wages. 
Apply at once. 1320 East Superior 
street. 

WANTED — EXPERIENCED WAI-T- 
ress; good wages; no Sunday- worK. 



FOR RENT — NEWLY FURNISHED 
rooms; centrally located; private 
family witli no children. Use of 
both 'phones. Call Melrose 2161, or 
Grand 924-Y. 

FOR RENT— THREE LARGE LIGHT 
rooms on second floor, 31 West Su- 
perior street; sultab e for light man- 
ufacturing or office*. ; Little & Nolle 
company. 



2614 W. Third 
1901 W. Third 
32 Tenth Ave. 
318 W. Fourth 
620^ W. Third 



St., 
St., 
W.. 
St.. 
St. 



rooms. . 
rooms. . 
rooms. . 
rooms. . 
3 rooms. 



.1 5.00 
. 13.00 
. 8.00 
. 14.00 
. 5.00 



•BUY GOOD FURNITURE" 
From Cameron - Johnson - Horgan 
furniture distributing salesrooms, 
2110-2112 West Superior street. 
Our factory to you proposition 
saves big money. Several large 
shipments just arrived. Your 
credit "O. K." 



* 

* 
* 

* 






STRYKER. MANLEY & BUCK, 

Main floor, Torrey building. 

165 — Both 'phones — 165. 



FOR RENT — ONE SEVEN- ROOM 
heated apartment. 1002 East Third 
street, with janitor service and water. 
Call either 'phone 423. Dacey Realty 
company. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROO.M 
ern improvements, hot 
one block from car line; 
able. Call 429 Twelfth 



FLAT, MOD- 
water heat; 
rent reason- 
avenue east. 



FOR RENT. 
•ROOM HOUSE, PER MO. 
■ ROOM HOUSE. PER MO. 

ROOMS, PER MONTH... 

ROOMS. PER MONTH. 



,.$15 
,. 12 
,. 8 
,. 6 
ALL CENTRALLY LOCATED AND 
CITY WATER INCLUDED. 
See CHARLES P. MEYERS, 
610 ALWORTH BLDG. 



KEYSTONE CHAPTER NO. 
20, R. A. M. — Stated convoca- 
tions, second and fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each 
month at 8 o'clock. Next 
meeting, special. May 2^, 1913. Work — 
Royal Arch degree. Trevanlon W. 
Hugo, H. P.; Alfred Le Richeux, secre- 
tary. 




A 




—Red 
Alfred 









FOR RENT. 

Sll EAST FIRST STREET. 

EigRt large rooms; furnace heat. 

R B. KNOX & CO. 



FOR RENT — SIX ; ROOM MODERN 

dlWe polsession"; l^Vquire'^ B^rldgeman- j ^>^^.i'^.^V;^,i^»»^^g-»ye ^;f»?&-X^^ 
Russell company. 16 West First street I -— rr^ - 



CLIFTON HOTEL, 
321 WEST FIRST STREET. 
Furnished room for light housekeep- 
ing, $2 per week. IL.&ry Le Flohlc. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS 
for light housekeepl ig; strictly mod- 
ern; use of 'phone. Melrose 3977, 
7061^ West Second street. 



FOR RENT— ONE OFl TWO DESIR- 
able rooms, unfurnished; very cen- 
tral. N. J. Upham company, 
dence building. 



Provl- 



FOR RENT — LARGE ROOM; ALL 
conveniences; In nice brick home; 
very centrally located. 201 East 
Second street. 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM FLAT WITH 
alcove; all modern conveniences. 7 
West Fourth street. Call Louis 
Oreck, 416 West Superior street. 



FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT, MOD- 
ern conveniences, except heat; cen- 
tral location. Inquire 12 East 
enth street, or call Grand 2177 



Sev- 



L77-D. 



FOR RENT — DESIRABLE MODERN 
basement flat, 2008 West Second 
street, $12.50. Altschul, 1731 West 
Superior street. Lincoln, 535. 



FOR RENT— FROM JUNE 15 TO SEPT. 
1, five-room furnished flat; central 
location. Price moderate. Call Mel- 
rose. 5901, evenings. 



FOR RENT. 



on second and third 

building, 221 and 223 

suitable for 



Space 
Axa 

perlor street; 
lodge rooms. 



floors of 
West Su- 
ofClces or 



R. B. KNOX & CO. 



DULUTH COUNCIL NO. 6, 
R. & S. M. — Stated convoca- 
tions, first and third Fridays 
of each month at 8 p. m. 
Next meeting, June 20. 1913. 

Work — Regular business. Hermon L. 

Dresser, T. L M.; Alfred Le Richeux, 

.secretary. 

DULUTH COMMANDER Y NO. 
18, K. T. — Stated conclave, 
first Tuesday of each month 
at 8 o'clock. Next conclave, 
Tuesday, May 27, 1913. Work 

Cross degree. John Cox, E. C; 

Le Richeux, recorder. 

SCOTTISH RITE— REGULAR 
meetings every Thursday 
evening at 8 o'clock. Next 
meeting, special, May 15, 1913. 
Work — General business and 
rioting. Henry Nesbitt. secr etary. 

ZENITH CHAPTER NO. 25". 
Order of Eastern Star — Regu- 
lar meetings, second and 
fourth Friday evenings of 
each month at 8 o'clock. Next 
May 23, 1913. Work— Regular 
and social. Modelle Bron- 
son, W. M.; Ella F. Gearhart, secretary. 

EUCLID LODGE NO. 198. A. 
F. & A. M.— Meets at West 
Duluth second and fourth 
Wednesdays of each month 
at 7;3o p. m. Next meeting 
May 28, 1913. Work — Second 

degree. W. B. Getchell, W. M.; A. Dun- 

leavy, secretarj-. 




meeting, 
business 




FOR RENT — FURNISHED FIVE- 
room flat; all modern conveniences; 
122 West Fourth street. Call 124 
West Fourth street. 



FOR RENT— F U R N [ S H E D ROOM; 
Mrs Louis Jordahl, 2 Vernon street: 
Thirtieth avenue west and Second 
street. 

FOR RENT — LARGE COZY FRONT 
room with bath and "phone. Call 
Grand 1810-Y'. 313 Second avenue 
west. 



Vienna 
stret. 



Cafe, 27 East Superior 



WANTED — GOOD 
oral housework; 
H. B. Knudsen, 
west. 



GIRL FOR 

good wages. 
228 Second 



GEN- 

Apply 

avenue 



WANTED — MAID FOR GENERAL 
housework; housecleanlng done; best 
of wages. 1531 East Superior street. 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

INSURANCE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES. 



F. 
A. 



McNaughton, 2022 W. Superior St. 

Larstn Co.. 214 Providence bldg. 
Duluth Realty Co., 608 1st N. Bank bldg. 
F D Field Co., 203 Exchange building. 
Qetty-Smirh Co., 306 Palladio 
The Home Realty Co.. 200 



building. 
Alworth bids. 



WANTED — BOY' BETWEEN 13 AND 
17 for one hour's work in morning 
from 6:30 to 7:30 four times a week; 
easy work for bright boy; state pay 
wanted. Address A 701, Herald. 



HELP WAJJTEB— MALE^ 

Free illustrated book tells of about 
300.0>.»0 protected positions In U. b. 
service. Thousands of vacancies 
evtry year. Tl.ere is a big chance 
here for you. sure and generous pay, 
lifetime employment. Just ask for 
booklet T-302. No obligation. Earl 
Hopkins, Washington, D. C. 

Learn barber trade, always In demand, 
big wages, easy work. Few weeks 
completes. Tools given, diplomas 
granted. Moler Barber college, 27 J:^. 
Nic. Ave., Minneapolis. Estab. 189.t. 



WANTED — COOK FOR SMALL 
camp, fifteen to twenty men; must 
be first class and economical; state 
wages wanted. Address L 674. Her- 
ald. 

WANTED AT ONCE — ONE FIRST- 
class, sober barber; wages 60 per 
cent: guarantee $17. Charles Bender, 
No. 32o International Falls, Minn. 



WANTED — THREE GIR1>S TO 
%vasto paper. Call Duluth 
Stock company. 



602 Railroad 



SORT 
Paper 
street. 



WANTED— TWO WAITRESSES AND 
two dishwashers at the California 
restaurant, 507 West Superior street. 



WANTED — GIRL 
housework; small 
wages. 1431 East 



FOR GENERAL 

family; best 

Superior street. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS FOR 
light housekeeping lake view: all 
modern conveniences. Melrose 6667. 



FOR RENT— NICELY FURNISHED 
room, strictly modern, gentleman 
preferred. 114 East 



Third street. 



Wanted— CAPABLE maid either 

or house maid; Mrs. \Naid 
205 Eighteenth avenue east. 



cook 
Atnes. 



WANTED — FIRST-CLASS COAT- 
maker at once; steady work. N. J. 
Setterlund. 1919 West Superior 
street. 'Phone, Lincoln 33-D. 



WANTED— TWO SINGLE MEN; MUST 
have some experience with carpenter 
tools. Call R. O. Sloane, Melrose 4083, 
at noon or after 5 p. m. 



WANTED — SOBER BARBER; STEADY 
job; $17.00, half over $27. at once. 
George S. McCralth, International 
Falls, Minn. ■. 



BE A BARBER VICTOR BARBER 
college mw starting a class at one- 
half winter price; tools, plenty of 
practice; position waiting; enroll now. 
124 H.nnepln avenue. Minneapolis. 

WANTED— MEN. WOMEN. GET Gov- 
ernment jobs; big pay; thousands of 
appointments; write for list of posi- 
tions. Franklin Institute depart- 
ment 178 D, Rochester, N. Y. 



WXNTED — ONE MORE LINOTYPE 
operator: proficient in English and 
Scandinavian languages: state wages 
and experience. Ited Wing Printing 
company, Ked Wing. Minn. 

WANTED — $10,000 ^FOR AN IDEA. 
.Men of ideas or inventive ability 
write for valuable books. Advice 
free. Randolph & Co., patent attor- 
neys. Washington. D. C. 



WANTED— MAN TO 
rv; Scandinavian 
Tramell, Sixteenth 
road. 



WORK ON 

preferred. 

street. Rice 



DAI- 

Ole 

Lake 



WANTED — BARBER AT ONCE. TO 
rent one-chair shop. Good position. 
Supplies and everything needed In the 
shop. P'or particulars write W. Free, 
Reiner. Minn. 

WANTED— TOU.NG MAN OR LADY TO 

handle Catholic supplies. Call or 
address The Charles Decker Co., cor- 
near First St. and Second Ave. W. 



WANTED— MAN TO WORK ON DAI- 
ry; one who can milk cows. A. An- 
der son. 2131 West Eleventh street. 

WANTED— 50 MEN TO BOARD AND 
room at the Hotel Grand. West Du- 
luth. Special rat es from May 1. 

WANTED — EXPERIENCED YOUNG 
man for farm. No milking. Apply 
701 Torrey building. 



WANTED — DINING ROOM GIRL AND 
chambermaid. Apply Hotel Grand. 
5219 Ramse y street. West Duluth. 

WANTED^GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Mrs. Harvey P. Smith, 
425 North Fifteent h avenue east. 

FOR 
1551. 



FOR RENT— LARGE, FURNISHED 
basement room for light housekeep- 
ing. 216 West Third street. 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM IN 
private family; brexkfest if desired. 
Call at 413 East Flr ^t street. • 

^^:^ KENT — TWO FURNISHED 
modern rooms for light housekeep- 
ing. 202 East Thircl street. 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS FOR 

light housekeeping, also single rooms. 

704 West Second st reet. 

5:5^^ HeNT — TWO FURNISHED 

rooms for light housekeeping; $12. 

307 West Fifth street. 



FOR RENT — VERY DESIRABLE 
five-room Hat, 312 Ninth avenue east, 
$27.50 a month. T. H. Hawkes, Lons- 
dale building. 



FOR RENT— FLAT OF FIVE ROOMS 
and alcove; modern; water paid; $16; 
June 1. 114 East Seventh street or 
Grand 901-X. 



FOR RENT — MODERN SIX-ROOM 
fiat, 128 West Fourth street. Apply 
at same address or 513 West Supe- 
rior street. 

RENT — FIVE- ROOM FLAT 
gas range and all modern, ev- 
heat. Call 504 Second avenue 



FOR RENT. 
6-room corner house, 429 Eighth avenue 
east; all conveniences; nice yard; $25 
per month. 

FAY-SCHAU COMPANY, 
Main Floor Providence Bldg. 
Both phones 24. 



^OR 
with 
cept 
east. 



FOR RENT— HEATED FLAT IN WEST 
end; four rooms; only $20. See N. 
J. Upham company. Providence build- 
ing. . 



^^-^ ifi^T — TWO FURNISHED 
rooms for light hcusekeeplng at *.9 
West Second street. 



FOR RENT— 2421 WEST SUPERIOR 
Street four-room flat; modern except 
heat; $10 per month. Eby & Grldley. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED HOUSE, 
eight rooms, thoroughly modern, hot 
water heat, gas range, etc.; $40 for 
six months or less, $30 for year to 
right party. 3302 Minnesota avenue. 
Melrose 5733. or see E. D. Field com- 
pany. 

FOR RENT — EIGHT- ROOM HOUSE, 
stone foundation; all modern con- 
veniences; four lots, garden, barn; 
half a block from street car, at 
Woodland; rental $45 per month. 
Inqui re at 602 Torrey building. 

FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM MODERN 
house on London road at Lakeside; 
$30 per month; Greenfield Realty 
company, 310 and 311 Columbia build- 
ing^ 

FOR RENT — NINE-ROOM HEATED 
house, 1822 West Second street; rent 
$35 summer, $40 winter months. N. 
J. Upham company. Providence build- 
ing. 




grce. 
leavy, 



DULUTH CHAPTER NO 59, 
R. A. M. — Meets at West Du- 
luth first and third Wednes- 
days of each month at 7:30 
p. m. Next meeting, May 21, 
1913. Work — Royal Arch de- 
Mason M. Forbes, H. P.; A. Dun- 
secretary. 



FOR RENT — NEW, FURNISHED 
house; four rooms downstairs; $17 
per month; at 4105 Regent street, 
Lakeside. Call at 4032 Gilllatt street. 



EUCLID CHAPTER NO. 56, 
Order of Eastern Star — Regu- 
lar meetings first and third 
Tuesday evenings of each 
month at 7:30 at West Du- 
luth Masonic temple. Next 
May 20, 1913. Work — Regular 
Sophia Hoar, W, M.; Pearl 




meeting, 
business. 
E. Boerner, secretary. 



ZENITH COUNCIL NO. 161, 
Royal league, meets the sec- 
ond and fourth Thursdays of 

the month at 8 p. m., K. of P. 

hall, 118 AVest Superior street. 
Shandoss Hoad, Kelley-How-Thomson, 
archon; collector, H. A. Hall, 18 East 
First street. 




DULUTH LODGE, NO. 2S, I. O. O. F. — 
Meets eiery K rid ay evening &t 8 o'clock, 
»t Odd Fellows' li8!l, 18 lA\sie areiiue 
north. Neil mretiiifi nicM Friday May 



Nomination of officers. 
Llndberg, Heo. bee. ; A. 



J. 
H. 



A. braJff, N. G. 
Paul, ¥\n. Sec. 



Oeo. 



FOR RENT—FLATS IN THE CHAT- 
ham; furnished or unfurnished; call 
Melrose 5310, or Pulford, How & Co. 



LET US 
home. 
Fourth 



MOVE 

Duluth 

avenue 



YOU TO YOUR NEW 
Van & Storage Co., 18 
west. Just phone 492. 



FOR RENT — NEWLY FURNISHED 
five-room apartment In new modern 
flat; centrally located. Melrose 6083. 



WANTED— COMPETENT MAID 
sreneral housework. Melrose 
Call 1906 East Fifth street. 



WANTED— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework: must be a good 
cook 2215 East First street^ 



WANTED — GLRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; good wages; no wash- 
ing. 1109 East Third street 



WANTED — COMPETENT 
girl at Children's home 
caring for older 



DULUTH 
to assist in 
children. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED SUITE 
rooms for liprht housekeeping. 
West Third street. 



OF 
213 



FOR RENT— STEAM- HEATED ROOMS 
and board. The Latofia, 122 East 
First stre et. , 

FOR RENT— FOUR ROOMS; ALL MOD- 
ern conveniences. 424 East Seventh 
street^ 

FOR RENT— WANTED. LADY ROOM- 
er- good home. 1« West First street, 
fiat 1. 



W \NTED— YOUNG GIRL FOR HOUSE- 

^ work in family of two 617 Tenth 

a V e nue east; Melrose 3160. 

WANTED — GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework; housecleanlng done. 
1901 East Third street. 



WANTED — THREE 
men. Apply Duluth 
Roofing company. 



ABLE-BODIED 
Corrugating & 



WANTED— MOULDER MEN. APPLY 
Duluth Lumber company, 364 Garfield 
avenue. 

WANTED AT ONCE — BAKER. AP- 
ply European bakery, 732 East Third 
street. 



WANTED IMMEDIATELY- THREEOR 
four first-class salesmen: straight 
salarv: contract if capable. IU)om 
331 Manhattan building. 



WANTED — LOCOMOTIVE FIREMEN, 
brakemen: wages about $100; experi- 
ence unnecessary; send age, stamp. 
Railway, care Herald. 



WANTED- -TWO FIRST-CLASS COAT 
makers; daylight, sanitary shop; best 
wages; steady work; Morrison, Mc- 
Kay Hotel build ing. 

WANTED AT ONCE— PRODUCE AND 
provision salesman for city; must be 
a hustler: none other need apply. Ad- 
dress L 25. Herald. 

WANTED — .SUITS MADE BY DU- 
luth's best tailors are for sale cheap 
at the Tailors' Exchange, 20 Fifth 
avenue west. 

WANTED — MAN FAMILIAR WITH 
use of dynamite to blast pine stumps 
In Carlton county. Address A 697, 
Heral d. 

WANTED — MANAGER FOR RESTAU- 
rant; one who can wall on table pre- 
ferred: wages $20 per week. J 677. 
Herald. 



WANTED — YARD MAN; MUST BE A 
good milker. 325 East Second street. 

WANTED AT ONCE — BUSHELMAN. 
Inquire 20 We st Superior street. 

WANTED— AN ORDERLY. APPLY 
St. Luke's hospital. 



WANTED— A COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; good wages. 409 

West Second street. 

ALSO 
221-23 



For Rent — Furnlphed rooms, single or 
for light housekeeping. 121 E. 2nd St. 



For rent — Furnlshecl rooms; light 
housekeeping allowed. 115 E. Sup. St. 



FOR RENT— MODERN, FIVE-ROOM, 
heated flat; possession June 1; 2310 
West Third street. Call Lincoln 52. 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE; GOOD 
condition; 310 Fourteenth avenue 
east; onlv $18. N. J. Upham com- 
pany, seventh fl oor Providenc e Bldg. 

FOir~RENT— FINE MODERN HOME ; 
very central, large lot, hot water 
heat two baths, fireplace, etc.; $45 
per month. Whitn ey Wall Company. 

FOR RENT — NEW STRICTLY" MOD- 
ern Lakeside home; large lot with 
shade trees; plenty of room for gar- 
den. Call at once. Lakeside 244. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM MODERN 
flat, 51014 Lake avenue north. In- 
quire b^/z East Fifth street. 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM FLAT, MOD- 
ern except heat 4310 Gilllat street. 
Lakeside; Lakeside 29-K. 



FOR RENT— FIVEROOM FLAT, FUR- 
nlshed complete. 731 West First 
street. P. W. La Panta. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM AND FOUR- 
room flats; modern except heat. 124 
East Fifth street. 



FOR RENT — SIX 
flat, $18 per month. 
Fourth street. 



■ROOM heatp:d 

Call at 429 East 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
rooms at 118 Third a venue west. 

FOR RENT— FOUrTiIOOMS. 420 SIXTH 
avenue west. 



FOR RENT — 
modern except 
street. 



FIVE-ROOM FLATJ, 
heat. 907 East Fifth 



FOR RENT— 413 FOURTH AVENUE 
east, modern ten-room house; fine 
large yard, $45. C. L. Rakowsky &. 
Co., 201 Exchange building. 



FOR RENT— LOWER PART OF FUR- 
nlshed modern house, with one room 
upstairs until Sept. 1. 27 Twenty- 
ninth avenue west. 



FOR RENT— EIGHT-ROOM HOUSE; 
modern except heat; 1128 East Seventh 
street. Inquire S. M. Kaner, 1123 East 
Fifth street. 



HAVE US MOVE YOU WITH OUR 
large van and experienced men. Du- 
luth Van Co., 18 Fourth avenue west. 



FOR RENT— EIGHT-ROOM FURNISH- 
ed house, large yard. 616 East 
Fourth street; Melrose 5026. 



WANTED — SECOND COOK; 
chambermaid. Ormond hotel. 
Lake avenue south. 



WANTED-NEAT GIRL FOR OENER- 
al housework; four in family. i\ii- 
East Fourth street. 



WANTED— GIRL TO TAKE 
2% -year-old boy. Apply 
Seventh street. 



C.A.RE OF 

221 East 



RENTrrSIORJ^S^^FICES 



SITUATION WANTED. 

FEMALE. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY WIDOVv 
with one child, position as house- 
keeper; widower with one child no 
Objection. S. 671, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY RELIABLE 
voung woman, position as general of- 
fice assistant; best of references; Z 
657, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— WOULD LIKE 
rooms to take care of by a respon- 
sible party, centrally located. C 661, 
Herald. 



WANTED — GOOD GIRL 
eral housework. Apply 
Third street. 



FOR GEN- 
1504% East 



AV ANTED — A 
Call between 
First street. 



COMPETENT COOK. 
4 and 6 p. m., 1925 East 



ONE 
Clif- 



WVNTED — CHAMBERMAID: 
willing to work; $30 per month, 
ton h otel. 

WANTED— A GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework at 2C15 East Third 
street. 



FOR RENT. 
Fine corner store. 201 North Cen- 
tral avenue; In best business dis- 
trict in West Duluth; size 25 by 
80; steel celling; fill cement base- 
ment; also large warehouse in 
rear; newly decorated through- 
out; rent very reasonable to right 
partv If taken at once. 

VV. C. SHERWOOD & CO., 
118 Manhattan Bldg. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT. ALL 
modern except heat. 632 West Third 
street. 



FOR RENT— MODERN SEVEN-ROOM 
house, 122 Twelfth avenue east; call 
499, either phone. 

PADDED VANS for moving furniture. 
West Duluth & Duluth Transfer Co, 



MAJESTIC REBEKAH LODGE 

•N'o CO. Regular meetings first 

and third Thursday evenings 

of each month at I. O. O. F. 
hall, 18 Lake avenue north. 
Special meeting May 29. Es- 
ther McKnlght, N. G. ; Minnie 
Hefferman. s ecretary. 

K O. T. M. " 

DXnA'TH TKN'f. NO. 1, KMGIITS OF 
the Maccabee* of the World, meeu first 
and thitd Mondays of each moiiib at 
Marcabe« hall, '.:1 I..al(e avenue north. 
Charles O. Futter. commander, 823 
North Fifty-seTentli avenue west; J. B. 

Gellneau, record keeper, office in i.all. Hour*. 10 a. 

m. to 1 p. m. dally. Zenith 'phone. Grand. ClO-X. 

DULUTH LODGE NO SOS] 
Loyal Order of Moose, meets 
every Monday evening at 8 
ucloek. Moose hall. 224 West 
FMrst stieet. J. J. Murphy, 
:;24 West First street. 




Sk 



l>n,rrH HOMEi^TEAD, NO. 3131 
Brolherhood of American Yetitnen meet* 
first and third Monday erenlLg? of each 
Imonlh, at Woodmen haU. fwenty-flrit 
avenue west and First stretili. i. J. 
Hughes, foreman, office 20^2 West Su- 
I*rii>FTireet holh phones; Mrs. J. A. liellraeur, cor- 
respondent, office 2022 West Superior street, old 
'phone 2338 Melrose. Zenith phone 521 -U Liacoln, 
residence No. 1 Exeter atreei. Zeulth 'phone 22J)-D 
Lincoln. 




FOR RENT - 
ly modnern 
east. 



- FIVE-ROOM STRICT- 
flat. 312 Second avenue 



FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM MODERN 
basement flat. 128 East Fifth street. 

FOR RENT— NICE FOUR -ROOM FLAT; 
central; 508 West Third street. 



fe^^A^-^\-;'g-J^'^^^^^f'^^'^^'»»»^^^'^^ 



*'.t*-A:'*';^*^«-*^'^>WWf**-?f'?t*T^^Mf.-.?-^. 



SITUATION WANTED — HIGH-CLAPS 
laundering to take home; both ladles' 
and gentlemen's. 821 East Third 
street. 



WANTED — GOOD 
dining room girl, 
west. 



EXPERIENCED 
228 First avenue 



WANTED— GIRL 
housework. 317 
east. 



FOR GENERAL 
Fourteenth avenue 



FOR R WT. 
No. 15 East Michigan street, suit- 
able for commlsflon house, hav- 
ing a large refrigerator already 
installed, or will remodel for any 
other line of business. 

See CHAS. P. MEYERS, 
610 Alworth Bldg. 



-^^*^ii«'*****^^'^-^^^f*^TWf*-.^#-^** 



WANTED — LAUNDRESS FOR ONE 
day In week at 425 Tenth avenue east. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housewo rk; 609 West Second street. 

"wanted — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 711 East First street. 



WANTED— PLATEN PRESS FEEDKM. 
Apply F. H. Lounsberry & Co., 
Fourth avenue west and Superior 
street. 



SITUATION WANTED — A FEW 
washings and Ironings to do at 
home. Address 508 East Ninth street. 



WANTED — HARNESS MAKER. 
st< ady p-isition. Wt-st End Harness 
Shop. 1G12 West Superior street. 

WANTED — PRESS FEEDER^ ALSO 
boy to learn the trade. Christie Lith- 
ograph company. 



WANTED MAN DISH WASHER. LAR- 
sen's Chop House. 408 West Superior 
street. 

WANTED — BOYS AT GRAND BOWL- 
Ing alley. 



SITUATION WANTED — CAPABLE AND 
efficient young lady desires position 
In office. Ad dress XXB, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY YOUNG 
lady stenographer; high school grad- 
uate; experienced. Grand, 6 51-X. 

SITUATION wanted" — COLORED 
woman desires employment days. 
Call Melrose 5084. 



SITUATION WANTED- 
enced housekeeper. 
Herald. 



-BY EXPERI- 
Write A 668, 



WANTED— Girls at the Central Em- 
ployment office. 125 W. Sup. 3L 



WANTED— GOOD GIRL FOR </KNER- 
al housework; c all Melrose 63 < 4 . 

-WOMEN TO DO 
East Fifth street. 



R. B. KNOX & CO. 



410 W. 4th St.; 10 rooms. 
222 E. 3rd St.; 8 rooms. .. 
412 6th Ave. W.; brick... 
26 7th Avt. W.; 5 rooms. . 



R. B. KNOX & CO. 



HORSESJ(EHICLES;JTC. 

1,000 HORSES AND MULES. 1,000. 

The largest assortment of horses and 
mules In the country, Including big 
draft horses, farm mares, delivery 
horses, drivers and big work mules. 
Fresh -horses arriving from the coun- 
try daily. Auctions every Wednes- 
day private sales dally. W^e can 
save you from $15 to $25 on every 
horse you buy. Every horse guaran- 
teed to be as represented. 

BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN. 

MIDWAY HORSE MARKET, 

St. Paul, Minn. 

WAGONS. WAGONS. WAGONS. 

A complete line of Studebaker and 
other makes always on hand, includ- 
ing dump, farm, dray, light and heavy 
delivery wagons: bargains in slight- 
ly used vehicles. Write for catalogue. 
L. Hammel Company, Duluth. 



jyiONEYJ^J^OAN^ 




M W. A. 
rMPF.niAT, TAMP. 2206 — MKi:TS AT 
Maccabee hall. Lake avenue north, mc- 
oud and fourth Munda.vs of etch month. 
D. C. Eagles, consul; C. P. Earl, clerk. 
P. O Ixix 411; F. A. Noble, district dep- 
utj-. 417 Columbia building. 



.$50.00 
. 42.50 
. 25.00 
. 28.50 



WANTED- 
Ing. 924 



WASH- 



WANTED- 
405 East 



-GIRL TO RUN 
Superior street. 



ERRAND.S. 



^^^i;^'TKO_LA UNDRY 
i.,uke'g hospital. 



GIRL AT ST. 



WANTEDJO^ENT^_ 

WANTED TO RENT - BY YOUNG 
lady: modcMii furnished room; cen- 
tral, permanent. L 665, Herald. 



BOATS^NDjWOTORBOA^ 

FOR SALF:— 40-FT. CABIN CRUISER; 
24-H P. engine, toilet, 4 berths; all 
fittings complete; $1,200, Motor Boat 
exch ange, 511 Torrey building. 

i^OR SALE— LIGHT CEDAR ROW- 
boats and launches. H. S. Patter- 
son, foot of Sixth avenue west. 



FOR RENT— THREE FINE STORES 
at First Ave. E. and Superior St.; 
newly decorated and In first class 
condition; rent v-ry reasonable; are 
suitable for any mercantile buslnesa 
See Martin Smith, 104 E. Superior St 



HORSES — GOOD — HORSES. 
Large selection to choose from; buy 
from a reliable firm; fair treatment. 
Zenith Sale & Boarding Stable, 524 
West First street. 



FOR RENT — CORNER STORE AT 
101 East Superior street; excellent 
location for any retail business. Call 
at store or at 530% W. Superior St. 



FOR RENT — THKEE FINELY Lo- 
cated stores, central. West end; rea- 
sonable rent. Altschul, 1731 West 
Superior street. Lincoln, 535. 



FOR SALE— TWO 18-FOOT LAUNCH- 
es, fully equipped. Call Cole Ii4-A. 



FOR RENT— LARGE SPACE, SECOND 
floor front, 24 West Superior street. 
Fine business location. N. J. Upham 
company. Providence building. 



FOR SALE — FOUR MARES. WEIGHT 
from 1200 to 1500 pounds; tliree 
horses, weight from 1150 to 1250 
pounds. Inquire Zenith City Boiler 
works.^ 

FOR SALE— ONE BAY DRIVING 
mare, about 850 pounds, 5 years old. 
826 East Fifth street. Grand 2096; 
Melrose 4856. 



that * 
)any ■# 



WHEN YOU WANT TO 
BORROW $10 OR MORE, 

vou naturally want It quickly, con- 
fidentially and at the most reason- 
able cost. You want to feel 
you are dealing with a comp 
who will consider your Interests, 
give you every advantage and ex- 
tend the utmost courtesy and con- 
sideration at all times. This service 
has pleased many others and Is 
sure to please you. 

DULUTH LOAN COMPANY, 

307 Columbia Bldg., 303 W. Sup. St. 

Open all day and Wednesday and 

Saturday evenings. 



* 
* 

* 

* 
it 



^^^^-^-^^^^^^^ T^^WWMWMMfi&^WE-*-** 



SALARY AND CHATTEL LOANS. 
If you get your money when needed 
from us at fair rates and easy pay- 
ments, you can be sure of a 

SQUARE DEAL ALL THE TIME. 

Try Our Easy Payment Plan. 

Borrow $10, pay $0.50 w kly or $2 m'th. 

$0.75 

$1.00 

$1.25 

loan 



CI.AN STEWART. NO. 50. O. S. C— , 
Meets first and tlilrrl Wed;ie«days each 
lUMilh. 8 p. m., rt V. O. F. hall. corti«t 
Fcunh avenue west and First st.-eeL 
Next regular meeting Vay 21, lalS. 
Alexander Anderson, chief; Ji hn D. Mac- 
Arthur, oecretary; John Burneu, financial secretarr. 
313 Torrej building. 





DLAMOND IX)IM;E. NO. 48, K. OF P. 
— Meeta every Monday evening in Sloan's 
hall, comer Tweuileth avenue west aiid 
Superior street. IJoyd Yergen. C. C, 
2226 West Flrki atreet. 8. L. Pierce. K. 
S. 

K. OF P. 
NORTH STAR LODOK, NO. 35. K. OF 
p —Meeu every l->ltlay evening at Ca«- 
Ue hall, 118 West Sujieri t street. G<'org» 
W Delert, C C. 1112 fist Fifth street. 
8. A. Heam, 28 North Twenty-eighth 
avenue west, K. of H. and S. 




financier, 



A. O. U. W. 
FIPFXirV LOnOE. NO. 
at Maccabee hoU, 21 Lake 
every Thuisday at 8 p. m. 
ben welcome. Initiation 
Thursday. May 8. S. U 
A. E. Plering, recorder; 
21T East Fifth aueet. 



105— MEETS 

avenue noitb. 

Visiting mem- 

ond smoker 

Pierce. M. W : 

O. J. Murvi-ld. 



or I 

w'kly or $3 
w'kly or $4 
w'kly or $5 
elsewhere. 



m th. 
m'th. 
m'th. 
bring 



Borrow $20, pay 
Borrow $25, pay 
Borrow $30, pay 
If you have a 
In your receipts and we will show you 
how much you can save by borrowing 
from us. 

DULUTH FINANCE CO., 
301 Palladio Bldg. 

DULUTH REMEDIAL LOAN ASSOC'N. 
401 First National Bank Building. 
Chattel loans on household furniture, 
repayable monthly or weekly payments 



Loan. 

$20 

$30 

$40 

$50 



Mo 



P'mts. Exp. And Interest 

5 $1.75 at rate of 

6 $2.75 1 per ce«t 
8 $2.75 per month 

10 $3.75 on balances. 



MOUEHN SAMARITANS. 
AIJ'HA COUNCIL. NO. l— TAKE NO- 
•Ice; That Beneficent degt^ meeta sec- 
ond and fourth Thurkdays and the Sam- 
aritan degree the first and third Thurs- 
days at v. O. F. hall, corner Fourth ave- 
nue wwit and First street. J. Kelly. O. 

S. ; Wallace 1*. Wellbanks. scribe: T. A. Gall. F. 6.. 

First National bank building. 

G. S. 




Emma Mahon, Ladj 




FOR SALE— SPAN PONIES. WELL 
trained to drive single and double or 
saddle. Inquire at 16 East First 
street. ^ 

For Sale — Horres of all kinds at lowest 
prices. Runqulst Stables, 2115 E. 
Water St. Melrose 1127; Grand 1648. 



FOR SALE— RUBBER-TIRED STUDE- 
baker trap, seats two or four. Price 
$50. Apply 1811 East Second street. 



l^OR RENT— OFFICE.S, 
per month; also rx»m 
facturlng. Applj 
fireproof. 



$10, $16, $17.50 

for light manu- 

Christie building. 



FOR RENT— HAL?- OF DESIRABLE 
office; roll top desk and chair for 
•ale; addreeg W WO. 



FOR SALE — TWO YOUNG HORSES. 
1500 pounds each: also nice delivery 
horses. Stevenson Home laundry. 

AND 
East 



WE LOAN ON ALL KINDS OF PER- 
sonal security at lowfst rates. Call 
on us. 430 Manhattan Bldg., and get 
rates. Duluth Mortgage Loan Co. W. 
Horkan. Ne-w 1598-D; Melrose 3733. 

MONKEY TO LOAN — HUNTERS — WE 
loan money on rlfies, shot guns, 
revolvers; will hold till next season 
before sold. Keystone Loan Co., 22 
West Superior street. 

MONEY TO IX) AN — LOANS MADE ON 
diamonds, furs, watches, all goods of 
value; $1 to $1,000; lowest rates In 
cltv. Keystone Loan Co.. 22 W. Sup. St. 




ROYAL ARCANUM, PULITH COUN- 

rll. No. 1482— Meets fecond and fourth 
Tuesday evenings at Maccabee hall, 21 
I,ake avenue nerth. Clinton Brooks, »ec- 

•etao, <01 Columbia building. 

ORDER OF 0Wi;8. DCI-UTH 
Neet. No. 1200— Meetings are ndd 
«.\cry flrat and third 



evening of 
hall. 418 
Joseph E- 



Wediief.iay 
each month at Kaglea 
Went Superior street. 
Feaits. aecretao". ^* 



East Superior street. 



No. 10. 



FOR SALE — HORSE, HARNESS 
buggy; price $125. Call 718Vi 
Fourth street. 



FOR SALE — Forty horses, all sizes. 28 
E Flr»t St "Western Sales Stable Co. 



MONEY FOR SALARIED PEOPLE AND 
others upon their own names; cheap 
rates; easy payments; confidential. 
D. H. Tolman, 509 Lyceum building 



MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE. 
$600 $1,000, $1,500. S. S. Williamson. 
Both phones. 616 Torrey Bids. 




A O. V. W. — Duluth Lodge, 
Meeu every second and fourth Tueadsy 
night at I. O. O. F. hall. 18 Lake 
oue north. Next meeting 
p. m. sharp. Inlilatlcn. 
Johnson. M. W. ; (Scorge 
J. SL Germain, financier, 



ave- 
M«y 27. 8 
Thomas A. 

F.. Llndb<-tg. 

18 West Fliat 



KODAKS^AND CAMERAS^ 

r'rs'"^ilPCOURAGINGr AFTER YOU 
have spent hours taking pictures, to 
find that vou have spoiled them. In 
the devfloping or printing. Take 
vour negativts to the Arcade Cam<'ra 
shop. 110 West Superior street. \ our 
work will be in the hands of an ex- 
pert. Full line of supplies and acces- 
sories handled. 

THE OWL STUDIO. 
Photo postcards, 3 for 25c. Enlarging 
and kodak finishing films developed, 
any size. 10c per roll. FREE Instruc- 
tion given to get the best pictures 
from your kodak. 2S0 W. Superior St. 



1 



^ 



1 
f 



I 



_« 



j»/ 




f^^^^lrSOli^ 




THE DULUTH HERAL 





VOLUME XXXI— NO. 39. 



FARRELL IS ASKED 



FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 23, 1913. 



TWO CENTS. 



AROUT STATISTICS ON 
STEEL TRADE ARROAD 



Accuracy of Figures Is 

Questioned By Federal 

Attorney. 



Head of Steel Corporation 

Once More Under Cross- 

Examination. 



He Admits Sale at Low 

Prices for Export 

Purposes. 



New York. May 23. — The cross-ex- 
amination of James A. Farrell, presi- 
dent of the United States Steel corpo- 
ration, was resumed today by govern- 
ment counsel in the suit to dissolve 
the corporation. 

He was questioned by Jacob M. Dick- 
inson, the tjovcrnment attorney, con- 
cerning the accuracy of statistical ex- 
hibits which hf had introduced to show 
the quantity of products sold abroad 
bv the corporation. 

"judge Dickinson objects to the sta- 
tistics on the ground that they are 
•'hearsay" evidence. „ ,. j, 

Mr. Farrell admitted that the United 
States Steel corporation sold steel 
cheaper to manufacturers of products 
intended for sale abroad, such as ma- 
chinery, than It Is sold to manufactur- 
ers of products sold in the domestic 
trade. 

••But we do that," said the witness, 
"in order to help American manufac- 
turers develop their export trade, just 
as the Interstate commerce commission 
allows the railroads to charge lower 
rates on products Intended for export 
than on domestic products. The gov- 
ernment helps^ to develop export trade, 
and so do we.*' 

TWEHfYflVTiiURT 
IN CANADIAN WRECK 



MAKES *'UNWARLIKE" 

SPEECH ON LAND LAW 




Coupling Breaks and Part 

of Canadian Pacific 

Train Derailed. 

Calgary. Alta., May 23.— Twenty-five 
persons, fifteen of them Chinamen, 
were injured when the Imperial Lim- 
ited express on the Canadian Pacific 
was wrecked at Mitford, forty miles 
west of here, last night. 

A broken coupling betwen the loco- 
motive and the tender ts believed to 
have caused the wreck. The train was 
running thirty miles an hour when 
the tender left the track. Three bag- 
gage cars directly behind the tender 
remained on the track, but the next 
car which was filled with the Ori- 
ental's, left the rails and was precip- 
itated down a steep embankment, 
turning completely over. Another car 
carrying passt-ngers was thrown from 
the tracks. Although several suffered 
serious Injuries, only one man Is be- 
lieved to be fatally hurt. 

News of the wreck was received 
here when a special train carrying the 
Injured arrived at midnight. All were 
placed in a hospital. , , . , 

Among those most seriously injured 
were D. Leonard, i'ortland. Or.; Otto 
Markle. Seattle; and Mrs. A. Knott, 
Calgary. 



THOMAS U. SISSON, 
Representative From Mississippi. 



PUTS STATE 
LAWS^ FIRST 

RepresentativeSissonTalks 

Again About California 

Case. 



MIKADO HAS 
PNEUMONIA 

Japanese People Plunged 
in Gloom Over Em- 
peror's Illness. 



HER APPOINllENT HAS 
STIRRED UP TROUBLE 



Multitudes Spend Day in 

Prayer for His 

Recovery. 



Says America Should Ac- 
cept No Dictation as 
to Laws. 



GOBELIN TAPESTRIES 
LINE THEIR PANTS 



Museum Janitor and Son 

Provided With Costly 

Garments. 

Paris, May 23. — The loss of some 
precious Gobelin tapestries, which were 
presented to the museum at Pau fifty 
years ago and which were valued at 
several thousand dollars, has at last 
been explained by the confession of the 
caretaker that he and his llttU boy 
have been wearing some of the tapes- 
tries as lining for their trousers. The 
caretaker declared he believed the 
tapestries were worthless, so he took 
them home to his wife. She selected 
a woodland scene to turn into nether 
garments for him and their son. 

BULGARIANS AND 

GREEKS AT WAR 



King Constantino Goes 

From His Capital to 

Saloniki. 

Athens. May 23. — In consequence of 
the resumption of hostilities between 
the Bulgarian and Greek troops. King 
Constantlne of Greece, accompanied by 
Prince Alexander and the general staff 
of the army, left for Saloniki this 
morning. 



Washington, May 23. — Representa- 
tive Slsson of Mississippi made his an- 
nounced Japanese speech today in the 
house. 

President Wilson, after Mr. Sisson 
recently made a "war speech," called 
the representative to the White House 
and asked him not to make another 
speech that might complicate the dip- 
lomatic negotiations with Japan or 
Inflame the public mind. 

Mr. Sisson today discLalmed any In- 
tention of making "a war speech," 
but attacked the position that the 
treaty-making power superseded the 
law-making powers of the sovereign 
states. 

Toward Any Nation. 

Mr. Sisson declared he took his po- 
sition "not because the Japanese were 
Involved; that he would take It to- 
ward. England, France, Germany or 
any other nation, and that it only re- 
quired patience and cool heads for 
both countries to arrive at an amica- 
ble, fair and just settlement of all 
differences." 

"If any nation," he said, "should de- 
ride that they will dictate to us our 
land laws, then we would be unworthy 
of national existence If we submitted 
to such dictation. Does any one claim 
that this Is a declaration of war be- 
lause I announce this truth? 

"It Is no declaration of war for 
the United States government to de- 
cline to override the rlglits of the 
sovereign state at the dictation of a 
foreign power." 

"If the United States government 
should deliver a state over to the 
mercies of a flood of aliens from any 
nation, then I maintain that the Fed- 
eral government would have prosti- 
tuted Its authority. Is the mere an- 
nouncement of this principle a declara- 
tion of war? 

"Nothing has been further from my 
mind than to embarrass or to tend to 
render more difficult the peaceful so- 
lution of whatever differences, real or 
imaginary, may exist between the 
friendly government of Japan and our 
own government." 

Oi»en DoOr on Treatlea. 

Mr. Sfsson pleaded for the open door 
on treaty sessions of the senate. 

"If the president and senate can 
make such a treaty, let us tear down 
every door of secrecy. I.,et us require 
the president to publish every letter 
and telegram bearing upon a contem- 
plated treaty on the very moment of 
its dispatch. Let the cloture of the 
senate be moved. Throw open the 
doors." 



Toklo. May 23. — Official reports that 
Emperor Yoshlhlto is 111 with pneu- 
monia, the constant attendance upon 
him by one or more of the eight court 
physicians, and the vigil which the 
Empress Sadaka kept at his bedside all 
night, made It appear today that his 
condition Is very grave. The whole 
Japanese empire was depressed by the 
news. 

The bulletin Issued th.ls morning 
only announced briefly that the em- 
peror's condition was unchanged. 

The high fever of last night, when 
his temperature ranged from 98.58 to 
102.92, apparently was unabated. 

The patient is at the Aoyama palace, 
on whose immense parade grounds he 
contracted a cold while reviewing the 
troops last Sunday. It had been in- 
tended to remove him at once to the 
newer Chlyoda palace, but the sudden 
serious turn of Inflammation of the 
lungs necessitated abandonment of the 
plan. 

Newfs Shocked People. 

The issuance of the first bulletin 
yesterday came as a great shock to the 
people, and as It gained circulation 
through extra editions of the newspa- 
pers a sorrowful hush fell upon the 
city, and great crowds silently assem- 
bled In front of the royal palace. The 
pfople knelt and prayed fervently for 
the speedy recovery of their sovereign. 

The Glnza, the most important busi- 
ness thoroughfare of the city, which 
is usually brilliantly lighted, was dark 
last evening and almost deserted. All 
the shops were closed. 

Court circles still are in official 
mourning for the late Emperor Mutsu- 
hlto. The period does not expire until 
July 30, a year from the date of his 
death. 

A bulletin on the emperor's condl- 

(.Contlnued on page 15. first column.) 

WOMEN GO SLUMMING 
IN WHITE HOUSE CAR 



Mrs. Wilson Gives Society 
Leaders Use of Auto- 
mobile. 

Washington, May 23. — "Slumming" 
In the automobile of the president of 
the United States has almost ceased to 
be a novelty, and today Mrs. Archibald 
Hopkins, society woman, reformer and 
friend of Mrs. Woodrow Wilson, for 
the second time In two days conducted 
a party of Investigators tc the squalid 
section of the capital In a White 
House car. This luxury of travel was 
made possible through the generosity 
of Mrs. Wilson, who placed the car at 
the disposal of Mrs. Hopkins. 

In Mrs, Hopkins' party were Senator 
Hollls of New Hampshire. Mrs. Owen, 
wife of the senator from Oklahoma, 
and Mrs. Pomerene, wife of the sen- 
ator from Ohio. 

The Investigations are being con- 
ducted under the direction of the wom- 
an's section of the National Civic fed- 
eration. The Investigators now are at 
work on legislation which they will 
press in congress looking to the elim- 
ination of the alleys and narrow courts 
that at present disfigure certain sec- 
tions of the capital. This legislation. 
It Is expected, will be sponsored by 
Representative Kahn of California. 




COMMIHEES' 
HEADSNAMED 

Democrats in House Have 

Agreed Tentatively on 

Assignments. 



Principal Changes Will Be 

in the Membership 

Lists. 



MRS. ANNIE G. ROGERS, 

Receiver of the Leadville, Colo., Land 

Office. 

Washington. Ms.y 23. — Secretary Lane 
has been strongly criticized by Repre- 
sentative Stanley E. Bowdle for his 
appointment of Mrs. Annie G. Rogers 
as receiver of the Leadville, Colo., land 
office. The new representative from 
Cincinnati resented in a vigorous state- 
ment the assertion of Mr. Lane that 
women "as a rule are more honest 
than men." He declared that at the 
earliest opportunity he will bring to 
the attention of the bouse the growing 
practice of appointing women to im- 
portant positions, especially in suffrage 
states. 



KING GEORGE 
TALKS^PEACE 

First Political Utterance 

at Berlin Gathering 

Seems Significant. 



Berlin. May 23. — King George of 
England, at present the gue.st of Em- 
peror William, spoke earnestly today 
on the necessity for the maintenance 
of world peace. In replying to an ad- 
dress presented :o h« n by the British 
residents of Berlla gathered at the 
British embassy. H,^ majesty said: 

"The preservation of peace is my 
fervent desire, an it was the chief aim 
and object of m^- father's life." 

This is the first political note sound- 
ed during the weddin-? ceremonies of 
Emperor William's only daughter, for 
which three emperors and many 
princes are gathered. The king's 
words seem, according to the opinion 
expressed in Influential circles, to epit- 
omize the chief significance of the 
royal visits as a demonstration of the 
peaceful and friendly relations exist- 
ing between the three powerful dy- 
nasties. 

lieiMhmam at Lanoheon. 

King George and Queen Mary this 
afternoon were the guests at luncheon 
of the British anbassador. those pres- 
ent including Imperial Chancellor Von 
Bethmann-Hollwr-g and John G. A. 
Lcishman, United States ambassador 
to Germany. 

At the same t;,me Emperor Nicholas 
of Russia was the guest at luncheon 
of the Russian ambassador. 

For the gala opera to be given to- 
night the first act of •'Lohengrin' has 
been selected by Princess Victoria 
Lulsec .v . 



Washington, May 23. — Democratic 
members of the ways and means com- 
mittee. It was asserted today, have 
agreed tentatively upon a number of 
the committees of the house, appoint- 
ments to which have been deferred 
because of the pressure of business. 
Immigration committee chairmanship 
will be retained by Representative 
Burnett of Alabama, who also served 
In the latter part of the last congress 
as head of the public buildings com- 
mittee. Most of the chairmanships 
win be undisturbed, but there will be 
many changes In the memberships. 

The Interstate commerce committee 
will be almost completely changed. 
Representative Houston of Tennessee 
must drop out to retain the chairman- 
ship of the census committee, and 
Representative Smith of Texas to keep 
his irrigation chairmanship. Other 
members are similarly situated. 
For ChalrmanMblpa. 

House leaders have made tentative 
selections for the chairmanships of the 
following committees: 

Agriculture — Representative Lever, 
South Carolina. 

Appropriations — Fitzgerald New 
York. 

Banking and currency — Glass, Vir- 
ginia. 

District of Columbia — Johnson, Ken- 
tucky. 

Education — Hobson. Alabama. 

Foreign affairs — Flood, Virginia. 

Immigration — Burnett, Alabama. 

Interstate and foreign commerce — 
Adamson, Georgia. 

Judiciary — Clayton, Alabama. 

Labor — Maher, New York. 

Merchant marine — Alexander, Mis- 
souri. 

Military affairs — Hay, Virginia. 

Naval affairs — Padgett, Tennessee. 

Postofflce — Moon, Tennessee. 

P\iblio lands — Ferris, Oklahoma. 

Rivers and harbors — Sparkman, Flor- 
«da. 

Insular affairs — Jones, Virginia. 
Thirty-Seven to HwU Moosers. 

The Republican assignments will be 
submitted soon by Republican Leader 
Mann. The Progressives will confer 
May 28 to decide finally on their list 
of selections for the thirty-seven com- 
mittee places they are to get. 

CHiGAGO BANKS PLAN 
THREE-DAY HOLIDAY 



Want All Business Houses 
- to Join Them Over 
July 4. 

Chicago. May 2.'?. — A movement has 
been started by the Clearing House 
association practically to stop the 
wheels of business In the city for three 
succes.8ive days, beginning Friday, 
July 4, and ending Sunday night, July 
6 Banks In the association agreed to 
close on Saturday. July 5. The Chi- 
cago Board of Trade and the Chicago 
Stock exchange probably will not open 
on Saturday, as It always Is a short 

day. . . ». ,. 

Officials of the association have ap- 
pealed to the board of directors of the 
Association of Commerce, and If the 
plan meets the approval of that body 
it Is believed that al] the larger busi- 
ness houses will remain closed on July 
5 giving empoyes three days of rest. 



BRYAN'S GRAPE JUICE IMPROVES WITH AGE. 



Seriona Conflict. 

London. May 23.— Dispatches from 
Saloniki and Athens report another 
serious conflict between the Bulgari- 
ans and Creeks. The recent fighting 
led to the establishment of a neutral 
zone near Saloniki but on May 20 a 
strong Bulgarian force with artillery 
entered the zone and were hotly op- 
posed by the Greeks. The result of 
the engagement has not been dis- 
closed. 

Servian and Greek objections still 
are delaying the assembly of the peace 
conference In London. 



ERIE MAN KILLS 

GIR L AND HIMSELF. 

Erie, Pa., May 23. — Jacob Demerle, a 
railroad engineer, today shot and 
killed his sweetheart. Miss Marie 
James, at her boarding house and then 
shot himself. Demerle died in a hos- 
pital an hour later. 



UNCLE JOE BACK; 
GLOATS OYER MANN 



Former Speaker Says It's 

Fine "Not to Be the 

Goat." 

Washington, May 23. — "Uncle Joe" 

Cannon, former speaker of the house. 
Is back In his old haunts as jaunty as 
ever, wearing the inevitable carnation 
In the lapel of his coat and with the 
same rakish tilt to the big black cigar 
that has made him famous. He is 
here to attend a meeting of the Lin- 
coln Memorial commission. In which 
both he and Former Senator Cullom of 
Illinois retained membership after 
their retirement from public life with 
the Incoming of the present congress. 

The former speaker, who Is in great 
spirits, already has taken occasion to 
gloat over the troubles of his former 
colleague. Representative Mann of 
Illinois, minority leader of the house. 
Mr. Mann was Mr. Cannon's lloor lieu- 
tenant during all the time the former 
speaker wielded the gavel and earned 
the title of "Caesar." 

"It's mighty fine," said "T'ncle Joe," 
retrospectively, blowing a huge cloud 
of smoke from his cigar, "not to have 
to be the 'goat' any more." 




SHOWS AHEAUX WAS 
PAID BY CHECKS ON 
AP^OYAL BY WOOD 






DEMOCRAT> ^^r CHDOG 
OF fifi TREASURY 




JOHN J. FITZGERALD, 
Of New York, Slated for Chairman of 
the House Appropriations Com- 
mittee. 



HILLES BACK 
ATJAPITAL 

Will Meet With Republican 

Committee to Hear 

Conciliators. 



Gallinger Classifies Mem- 
bers as to Their Pro- 
gressiveness. 



Washington, May 23. — CharUs P. 
Hllles, chairman of the Republican na- 
tional committee, is expected here late 
today to prepare for tomorrow's meet- 
ing of the national executive commit- 
tee, called to consider preliminary 
plans for party reorganization and to 
hear from the conciliation committee 
of Progressive Republicans. 

The conciliation committee appointed 
as the result of the recent Chicago 
conference of Republican Piogressives 
to urge party reformations and a na- 
tional convention next fall, met today 
with its chairman. Senator Cummins, 
to outline plans for an argument be- 
fore the executive committee. 

Former Governor Hadley of Missouri 
and Representative Sidney Anderson of 
Minnesota were unable to attend. Be- 
sides Senator Cummins there were 
present Senators Crawford and Jones 
arKl Representatives Cramston of 
Michigan and Rogers of Massachu- 
setts. 

The principal purpose of the concilia- 
tion committee is to Induce the execu- 
tive committee to call a meeting of 
the national committee in the near fu- 
ture to consider Issuing a call for a 
party convention to take up reorgani- 
zation plans. 

Chairman From Hunse. 

Senator Gallinger, chairman of the 
committee of senators to confer with 
house leaders on re-organlzation of 
the Republican congressional commit- 
tee, said today that the chairmanship 
of the re-organized committee would 
go to a member of the house. 

"In organizing the senators com- 
mittee," Mr. Gallinger continued, "we 
thought we must recognize the so- 
called Progressive wing of the party 
as well as the so-called reactionaries. 
Senator Norrls was a reactionary in 
the house and is a very active Pro- 
gressive In the senate. Senator Jones, 
I suppose, Is three-quarters Progres- 
sive, whatever that terms means, and 
Senator Townsend, I suppose, is about 
1-16 Progressive. Senator Clark of 
Wyoming and myself are the reaction- 
aries, I suppose." 

ANHUT SENTENCED TO 
TWO TO FOUR YEARS 



Lawyer Who Tried to Get 

Thaw Free Goes to 

Sing Sing. 

New York, May 23. — John .\nhut, the 

lawyer convicted of bribery in attempt- 
ing to obtain the release of Harry K. 
Thaw from the Matteawan asylum for 
the criminal Insane, was s**ntenced to- 
day to serve not less than two years 
nor more than four In Sing Sing prison. 
♦- 

I<:aM^4^^ For CUIncMe 1>oan. 

Rerlln, May 23. — The portion of the 
Chinese loan issued in Germany was 
over-subscribed five times. 



I THE DAY IN CONGRESS I 



State Produces Vouchers 

in Trial of Conspiracy 

Case. 



Signatures Are Identified 

By Paying Teller of 

Bank. 






SEXATK. 

Not In seMilon; meetn 2 p. m. 
Monday. 

Finance MuI>romiiiittee continued 
heartngM on tariff KcheduleM. 



HOl'SB. 

Met n4 noon. 

Itepresentative SImmoo In 
attacked noverniurnt's 
niakluK power ivhere It 
Keded law-mnklnic powem 
dividual MtateH. 



Mpeeeh 

treaty- 

nuper- 

of In- 



Woolen Company Treas* 

urer Also Testifies for 

Prosecution. 



Boston, Mass., May 23. — Checks an« 
vouchers for several payments madd 
by the American Woolen company t<y 
Frederick E. Atteaux were Introduced 
by the state this morning at the open* 
Ing of today's session of the trial of 
Atteaux, William M. Wood and Dennis 
J. Collins, 

The first of the voucher's showed th» 
payment of |505 to Atteaux "for ex- 
penses Incurred during the LAwrenc* 

^^'i^i^®-". "^^'^ ^'^^ drawn on March 23, 
1912. Another check for $2,100 wai 
drawn on June 26, this being marked 
•In full for all claims to date." 

The vouchers Indicated that the pay- 
ments were authorized by President 
Wood. Both checks were indorsed with 
Atteaux's signature. 

Offered By State. 

The exhibits were offered In sup- 
port of the state's claim that the de- 
fendant conspired with John J. Breei* 
and Ernest W Pitman to "plant " dvna- 
mlte In the homes of the strikers at 
l^awrence in oider to give the Impres- 
sion to the public that the strikers con- 
templated blowing up the American 
Woolen company's mill. 

The state attempted to show that 
President Wood was Involved ana 
that the American Woolen companv, 
through Wood, had helped pay the ex- 
penses of the conspiracy. 

Edward B. Lynch, paying teller of 
the Federal Trust company of this 
city, where Atteaux had funds on de- 
posit, took the stand and identified 
Atteaux's signature on four or five 
papers which District Attorney J. C. 
Pelletler offered as exhibits. 
Objection By I^aw^yer. 

Henry F. Hurlburt, of counsel for 
Mr. Wood, objected to their admission 
as evidence against his client. He 
argued that the exhibits were not com- 
petent until some conne tlon had been 
established between the papers and 
the alleged conspiracy. "The dl.<trlct 
attorney replied that the papers would 
speak for themselves and would show 
the payment of money from one de- 
fendant to another. 

Judge Crosby admitted the exhibits 
with the understanding that they 

(Continued on page 16, 2nd column.) 

ROBBER of' BANK 

AT BOSTON DEAD 



Frederick T. Moore's Life 

Ends in Valparaiso, 

Chile. 

Boston, Ma?s., May 23.— The death at 
Valparaiso, Chile, of Frederick T, 
Moore, former assistant receiving tel- 
ler of the National Bank of Commerce 
of this city, who absconded fourteen 
years ago with $o3,0(»0 of the bank's 
funds, was reported here today. 

Moore fled from Boston In 1S98 when 
Irregularities were found In his books. 
He was arrested In Valparaiso a year 
later on a charge of embezzlement, hut 
the courts refused extradition. During 
hie residence Sn Valparaiso he became 
one of the leading business men of the 
city. 

WOULD-BE SUEUTHS 
DELUeiNG M'ADOO 



» » 4 ****^**»******** ** * ** *J 



Many Applying for Places 

That Are Not 

Vacant. 

Washington, May 23. — A deluge of ap- 
plications for appointments to the 
United States secret service customs 
has overwhelmed Secretary McAdoo, al- 
though there are no vacancies. 

One man who believes the govern- 
ment needs him In Its detective work 
sent the secretary a list of about 150 
occupations wliioh he has filled, to 
prove he was competent to take any 
kind of sleuth work. These were some 
of the trades: Stage driver, laborer, 
sch'.ol teacher, proprietor and editor, 
doctor, rough carpenter, mall carrier, 
lumber trade, waiter ar.d bar tender. 

ST. PAUL^ESTAURANT 
INQUIRY IS BEGUN 

Labor Bureau Asks About 

Working Conditions 

and Wages. 

St. Paul, Minn.. May 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — An Investigation of 
working conditions in restaurants 
where girls are employed has begun 
here under the direction of the .^tato 
labor department. The investigation 
soon will be extended to department 
stores and factories, and Information 
will be gathered relative to the num- 
ber of hours girls are compelled to 
work each day, the wages they re- 
ceive, and the general moral conditions 
surrounding Institutions emjiloyine 
large numbers of girls. Statistics will 
be compiled and an effort will be made 
to ascertain whether women and girls 
employed in factories and stores are 
rt-celving a living wage. 

A law passed by the recent legisla- 
ture provides that no woman or girl 
shall work more than fifty-four hours 
In seven days or more than ten houm 
In one day. 




^ 




mmmmf9t 



Friday, 



THE.DULUTH HERALD 



May 23, 1913. 



W'FATHER — Gonerally fair weather tonight and Saturday: sliuht chn!-^ 



■ s in t.'!iufT.i»Mr-; s.iun'.vvostorly wln'ln 



I 




GET WHAT'S 
G TO THEM 



The phenomenal success gi the greater Oak Hall is the logical result of 
wonderful value-giving. Thousands of men are being converted to our 
new way of clothes selling. Saturday will be another very busy day A 
real organization is here to serve you- c.uiie to the best equMM^^ lothe. 
store to be found anywhere, \oull see ^^ ^^ $ ^J ET 

your clothes buying advantage here at ^t' ■ ^J TO •J EJ 
every price from ■ ^^ ^"^ 

SPRING SUITS FOR MEN AND YOUNG MEN 

Tl.ou.ands of suits, every model emi.oa.es the best uleas o| America s 
brainest designers. Especially selected tal.r.cs that only the hi-h prae to 
measure tailors show, are here and ready &■•* K XC COIl C #5 
to wear at lualt-to-measure prices ^HT.tJ, «J»fcW> S'^"' 

REGULAR AND EXTRA SIZES 

Smartly styU'J, conservative model-s for 
busy business men. Special models for 
all men. Stout, slim, tall or short, and 
extra sizes up to 50-inch chest. Fabrics 
carefully selected for each model to in- 
sure harmony of weave and good wear. 
A revelation in perfect tailoring and tit — 



Young Men's BETTER STYLES 

Young men's .-special styles a notable fea- 
ture Norfolks in many new models 
English and high-class Americanized 
ideas. Gun checks, shepherd checks, 
club checks, pin stripes, black and wlute. 
rich worsteds, cheviots. homespuns, 
^..r..,^^ Nothing like them elsewhere at 

$14.4S, $20, $25 

'society Brand' Clothes V^,T^^;^ ^^'^rr'S:.^^'^ t-hroak;'^.^rii.^^Jr^; 

know them is to kiu.sv the limit of clothes value from every standpoint. 



$14.45, $20, $25 



BOYS* CLOTHES WOMOERFUL VALUES 




npfprmined to win the boys' confidence and hold it. we offer 
?alues in boys- cTothes that cannot be duplicated elsewhere. Com- 
plele lines of boys' and children's furnishings ^oods too. Bo s 
Norfolk and Double Breasted ^£.95, $3.95, 54.85 anO Up 

SPRING SHIRTS— 
Remarkable Ail New Showing 

Important showing America's 
best values, classy new patterns, 

at — 



HEADQUARTERS NOBBY HATS 



You Need Not Worry About 

NECKWEAR! 



Come here tomorrow and select a 
new tie just in by expro.s.>* this aft- 
ernoon from New York. Styles that 
will be shown here and iii^ Broad 
way tomorrow for the 
first time 



Ill Di 'ran- 

50c 



Larg.'st Stetson Hat stock in 
the West. Every good Stetson, 
staple as well as leading Stet- 
son novelties, stiff or soft — 
$3.50 and $5 

BEST $3 HATS 

on earth — every popular price 
and popular style. 

English Cloth Hats — 
$1 to $1.50 

UNDERWEAR COMFORT FOR MEN 

We've given special attention 
to the selection of proportions 
and sizes. Your pet underwear 
idea is here. Union Suits at — 

$1 to $3 



S«e What Our 
Show Windows 
Display Today. 

Great Stylo 
Show in Our 
Windowi 
Saturday. 





li 



i 





''Correct Dress for Women 



ANNOUNCE 





t and Girls'' 



Great Readjustment Sales 

•[[Owing to the heavy incoming shipments of mid-summer wearables many booths 
must be vacated to make room — we offer the following unusual values for quick 
disposal in women's, misses' and children's apparel. 



-SUITS 



$1 and $1.50 

Spring Neckwear here that re- 
flects every whim of fashion — 
more than 5,000 beautiful new 
silk.s, at — 

25c to $1.00 

SATISFACTION IN MEN'S HOSE 

Be.st Hosiery stock In the 
West. Any hose a man can think 
of is ready here; every color, 
every size, everp price — 
15c, 25c, 35c, 50c and Up 



1 ^1 j 50 Suits in a Wide range $i ;-.00 
L^vJL I of materials, colors I Cj 

and sizes— values $22.50 to $35 at * ^^ 

I 19 150 Suits regularly $0^.00 
LOl ^ selling at $35.00 to ^ X 3 
$49.50, tiow -fc^v^ 

I 1 o 20 Plain Tailored $Q Q.SQ 
UUl J Suits— regularly >^ M 

selling at $55.00, now ^^ ^ 

I ^1 ^ 75 Suits-regularly $Q CI.OO 
LOT 4 selling at $55.00 to ^^iQ 
$90.00, now v^^ 



MILLINERY 

Including our entire line of Early Spring 
Stock. Any woman who is looking for 
unusual values should not miss this op- 
portunity. 

125 Hats in a large variety of styles 
and colors, in flower, feather and ribbon 
trimmings— regular values $7.50 to $35 at 

Half Price 



OAK HALL BL'ILDING 




ENGINE HITS AUTO; 
ONE FATALLY HURT 

Other Seriously Injured at 

Stephen Crossing Near 

Crookston. 

Crookston. Minn.. May 23.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Thrown out of an 
automobile when a light engine on the 
Gr.-at Northern crashed Into It at 
Stephen Crossing at midnight Glen 
Carnegie was fatally injured and later 
di*d and Arthur Rost was seriously In- 
jured. Appearances point towards 
carelessness on the part of the auto- 
Ists The engine was returning f i om 
Winnipeg and running just ahead of 
the Wiiuilpeg-St. P aul fly er. 

CANDIDATES^ 

SUCCEED GRONNA 

Lively Contest Is Expected 

for North Dakota 

Senatorship. 

Fargo, N. D., May 23.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Former Governor John 
Burke and Congressman Helgesen are 
likely to figure in the next United 
fitates Senatorial race In North Da- 
k')ta along with Senator Gronna and 
Attorney General Miller. 

For many months It has been un- 
derstood that Attorney General Miller 
will contest the senatorship with 
Gronna. Now it i.s rumored that Con- 
gressman Helgesen will also enter the 
race if Miller does. 

Should these three enter the race the 
Bull Moosers would also probably have 
a man in the contest This would also 



split the antl-Democratlc vote into 
four parts and the high man would 
probably not receive more than a third 
of the total Republican vote. 

There is an element of the Demo- 
cratic partv which seeks to push 
Chairman McArthur of the Democratic 
state central committee Into the gov- 
ernorship, ahead of National Commlt- 
t.-eman Bruegger. This .same con- 
tingent Insists that Former Governor 
FJurke must enter the senatorial race, 
and that with the divided opposition 
Burke could easily be high man. Just 
what position Burke would take in 
this matter is problematical. He 
might prefer to remain treasurer of 
the United States. 




spt'Ctive townships. In counties not 
having poorhouses the townsliips mu.st 
bear 25 per cent and the counties 75 
per cent of the care of the Indigent. 

LOUIS Ordain 

DEAD IN LONDON 




For Ladies Only 

Your last summer suit, dress 
or party gown can be freshened 
to look just like the new ones 
you see in the store windows. 
If sent to us to be French Dry 
cleaned; no gasoline, or shop 
odor, no spots or shine left. A 
E^uarantee accompanies every de- 
livery and the cost Is trifling. 
Telephone or stop the white 
wagon with the blue pennant. 
Yale Laundry French Dry Clean- 
ing department, both phones 2442. 
Men's suits and Topcoats dane 
the same way. 




TOWNSHIP AFFAIRS 
HANDLED DIFFERENTLY 

Fargo, N. D., May 23.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Under new laws a num- 
ber of changes are made in handling 
township affairs. Assessors, town 
clerks constables. Justices and treas- 
urers 'will be elected for two-year- 
terms The treasurers must deposit 
the funds In the name of the township 
Instead of the name of the treasurer 
and they cannot draw Interest on de- 
posits as formerly. The supervisors 
' must look after the poor of th^ir re- 



Duluth, Minn 



Chicago, III. 



Danville, III. 



Clinton, Iowa 






7 Weti ^uj'trior Street— N'ear Lakt Ave. ''The New Store.'' 

YOUR CHOICE OF ANY 
SUIT IN STOCK 



Famous Swindler Who Dis- 
appeared in 1908 Passes 
Away. 

Chicago. May 23. — Government of- 
ficials have received word of the death 
in London of Louis A. Gourdain, wlio 
swindled the public out of several 
large fortunes, which he squandered, 
and whose success drove him mad. 

Starting twenty-seven years ago as 
a clerk for the Louisiana State Lot- 
tery company. Gourdain organized a 
rival concern, which netted him $750.- 
000. It is estimated. The money came 
so fast his mind was affected and he 
was sent to a hospital for the Insane 
after driving through New Orleans In 
a bath robe and attempting to make 
speeches from light poles. Later he 
was convicted by the government of 
operating a lottery and served a six 
months' sentence. 

He drifted to New York and opened 
what he called a bank, which was a 
lottery scheme. He was convicted and 
served a year on Blackwell's island. 

He showed up next in Omaha, and 
later in New Orleans, where he bought 
1 "JO acres of swamp which he con- 
verted into 133,000 oil lots. 

Made »5,500 Into »l,0«O.00O. 

In Chicago he opened the 'Manhat- 
tan Exchange bank," and is .said to 
have turned $5,500 Into a million. 

For this sclieme he was sentenced to 
serve four years in the penitentiary. 
An appeal was taken and Gourdain 
went to the prison gates and pleaded 
for admission. He bought a mansion 
In Joliet, where the state prison Is 
located, for his wife, and purchased 
ground upon which to build a private 
prison Before work was started on 
the building the supreme court af- 
firmed his sentence. 

He made a Sensational escape from 
the Washington, D. C, asylum In 1908, 
and had not since been heard from. 

GASS COUNTY GETS 
LARGEST AMOUNT 



-COATS 



I ^i. < 50 Coats, ones and twos left from the 
L/Ul 1 heavy selling, made in ^"j f\,Y5 
handsome novelty fabrics and plain 
serges;- regular value $15 to $29.50. 



10 



50 Coats, in 



ranofe of materials and ^ I V>« 



Lot 2 

styles; regular values $25 and $29.50 
I i Q 25 Coats in eponges, plain and nov- 
L/Ol kJ elty weaves, serges and ^O £^.00 
Bedford cords ; regular values $35 ^^ "j 



WAISTS 



Unusual values in high-class Waists and Blouses of 
Chiffon, Voile, Crepe de Chine and all-over embroid- 
ery trimmed styles, 18 waists in the lot. (r»f Q rCA 
Regular values $16.50 to $22.50 at vplO.OU 

Voile Waists — Embroidery and lace trimmed ; 20 
waists in the lot ; regular values $5.00 Q Q T^-\ 

and $8.50, now ^0,l O 

12 Chiffon Crepe Waists; regular values 
$12.50 to $16.50, now 



.$4.75 

Lingerie and Voile Waists, Dutch and hicfh neck Q*) 'Z^ 
styles; all sizes; regular values $4.50 to $5.75, at. ^^» I k) 



n^ 



»;.<. 



DRESSES 



for social functions and street wear. Materials are Crepe 
de Chine, Eponge, Chiffon, Charmeuse and Serge. 

50 Dresses, formerly selling at $25.00 and 
$29.50, n jw.-. 



$19.50 



20 Dresses, formerly selling at $3S.00 and CJO/I ^C) 
Ipjy.bU, now T^ • 



3 Dresses, formerly selling at $55.00, 
now 



$29.50 

2 Dresses, formerly selling at $59.50 and (f OQ t^fX 

$65.00, now *PkJZ/»U\J 

One $45,00 Pompadour Chiffon Gown %00 ^Q 

One $39.50 Pompadour Chiffon Gown ^1Q 50 

One $6500 Pink Chiffon Gown $20 00 

One $25.00 Maize Chiffon Accordion ^10 Kf) 

Pleated Gown at ^{^.OVJ 

One $69 50 Fancy Ecru Net Gown 
at 



$37.50 



JUNIOR & CHILDREN'S 



WEAR 



JUNIOR SUITS 

$35.00 ''Polref Sash Suits, 
in navy blue and shepherd 
checks, trimmed with con- 
trasting sashes, ^ 1 Q T^ 

$29.50. $32.50 and(^9K nCi 
$35 Junior Suits. . vP^«J.v/^ 

A clearance of all ones and 
twos of early numbers; excel- 
lent styles and materials; 
blouse effects; belted models, 
draped skirts; serges, checks 
and eponges. 

San Toy and Rc^rulatlon Mid- 
dy BIoiLScs, $3.00 ^2 75 

Tailored Coats at. . . (lJ7 PCA 
$15 to $21.50 val- 'P / .vJW 
ues; % and full lengths; 
sizes 12 to 16. English 
tweeds, mixtures and shep- 
herd checks. 



A number of Little Tot*' Coats 

— Sizes 2 to C; white and col- 
ors; formerly $5 <^Q f\r\ 
to $12.50, at ipJ.UU 

An absolute rh^aranoe of 50 
(iirls' Coat.s, .sizes * -i OH 
6 to 14, at »p^.i^U 

Regularly $6.75 to $8.75. Neat 
models in light colored mix- 
ture.s; many of them have 
half belts on the back. 

Large a.ssortinent« of Wash- 
able .School Dresses at $3.00, 
$2.75, $2.50, $2.00 (T 1 xr\ 
and vp 1. JU 

FOR .SATURDAY ONLY. 

$5.00 Pure Worsted <I»0 TK 
Sweaters at *pO. / «J 

Plain weave, full fashioned, 
hand-made buttonholes; con- 
vertible collar; colors white, 
gray, red and tan. 



No goods sent on approval or exchanged. 



Madame Irene ''Successo" Corsets, reg- (^ Q /T/l 
ular values $5 to $7, on sale at ^xJ.OU 



witnesses. The mortgagee must fur- 
nish a copv of the original instrument 
and the witnesses must al.so sign it, 
then this copy is turned over to the 
mortgagor, who erivfs the mortgagee 
a receipt for It. In order to have the 
chattel mortgage filefl with the regis- 
ter of deeds, the mortgagee must pre- 
sent this receipt as well as the orig- 
inal document. This will lessen oppor- 
tunities for fraud. 

DISTRICfCOURTJURY 
FINDS MORjllS GUILTY. 

It took a Jury In district court be- 
fore Judge Cant onl,- twenty minutes 
v.iKtKrda.v afternoon to nnd that faui 
korris on trial charged with grand 
larceny, flrst degree was gul ty 
%torfi3 stole $50 Jrom Nicko'.a Ra- 



dancliich on April 22. When arrested 
he broke away from the police and al- 
though handcuffed made his escape 
from the city. He was captured sev- 
eral dav» later at Peoria, 111. Deputy 
.Sheriff McDonald brought him back to 
Duluth. 



VAUDEVIL LE AN D DANCE, 

Members of Court Du Luth, I. 0. F. 
Will Entertain Friends. 

Members of the Independent Order of 
Foresters and their friends will be en- 
tertained by Couct du Luth, No. 724, at 
a vaudeville performance and dancing 
pirt> at Foresters' hall. Fourth ave- 
nue west and First street, this eve- 
ning. 

The committee has arranged an en- 



tertalnlner vaudeville program. In 
whicu the participants will be Miss 
Plancue Williams, Harry Hutchlns, 
Jack O'Leary, William Elstad, James 
Dunn, Harry Budd. Gould & Wright, , 
Charles Young and «. H. Fisnel. i 

Following the program Im Brosse's 
orchestra will play for dancing. The j 
entertainment will be fr«e to Forest 
era and their friends. 



Mh 



POPE HEAD OF 



MANUFACTURERS. 




FREE ALTERATIONS 

YOUR CHOICE OF ANY COAT IN STOCK 



Apportionment of School 

Money in North Dakota 

$3.79 Per Pupil. 

Bismarck, N. D.. May 23.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— The schools of North 
Dakota received $624,234 for the quar- 
terly apportionment recently made by 
the superintendent of public instruc- 
tion This was divided between ]67.3o5 
children, making |3.79 per capita. 

Cass county has the largest number . 
of pupils as a result of the location 
o" Fargo within its boundaries. Grand 
Forks la second, Morton third, ^^ ard 
and Walsh tied for fourth and Rich- 
land fifth. ., ^ ... 

Oliver got the amalleat sum and the 
next smallest in order were Eddy, Mc- 
Kenzle. Bowman. Foster, Divide, Kid- 
der and Golden Valley. 

TO lessenTrauo. 

North Dakota's New Chattel Wort- 
gage Law Effective July 1. 

Fargo, N. D., May 23. — (Special to 
The Herald. — The ugly charges of 
fraud In connection with chattel mort- 
gages are less likely to be made after 
July 1. as the last legislature sur- 
rounded the maklner of those mort- 
e-ages with so much reu tape deception 
and trickery will be difficult. In 
the old days it was unnecessary to ex- 
ercise much care. Under the new law 
the mortgage must be signed by two 



Every Household Needs One 




ThlsHandyCom- 

blnation Chair 

and Stepladder 

good looking, well 
built and never sold 
elsewhere for less 
than $1.75. 

Our Special 
Price 



Use .as a Chair 
any place about 
the home. 



Watch Our 

Ads From 

Day to Day. 



$1 




Detroit. Mich., May 23.— The follow- 
ing officers were elected by the direc- 
tors of the National Association of 
Manufacturers after the annual meet- 
ing In Detroit: 

President — George Pope, Hartford, 
Conn. 

General manager — J. P. Philip Bird, 
New York. 

Secretary — George S. Boudinot, New 
York. 




e 



'Use as a Ladder 
to reach high 
shelves, etc. 



Ton Will 

Find It WiU 

Surely Pay. 



TRUNKS OF MERIT 

our own make — Quality liasA 
and Suit Casess at prices con- 
sistent with quality. 
Tomorrow we offer 8 specials: 

36-inch Trunk ; regularly 

t^T.!"' $10.00 

Suit Cases, cowhide, 24 in.; 
regularly $6.50, d^r AA 
this week ^va UU 

Traveling Bags, cowhide, 
regularly $6.50, ^r AA 
this week ^ilallU 

DULUTH TRUNK CO. 

Emt. 1888. Mannfftctarera. 

220 West Superior St. 



D. 11., 5--0-1; 



* 



r , 



? 



I 



I 



Buy and Try a 

Columbo 
$14.50 
Suit 



Til© best answer to 
tho youna: man's 
olothes question. 



Selections this Spring are 
better than ever, so is the 
style, the workmanship and 
the true value of these 
COLUMBO Suits. 




At Third Ave. West 





Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 






"Qompoiu/ 



24 and 26 West Superior Street— Near 1st Ave. West. 



Unparalleled Reductions During Our 
Expansion Clearance Sale 

We're forced to early reductions on account of the remodel- 
ing of store for want of more space. 

Sr^iTsJes. Tailored Suits ^j-so 



$25 to $35 Values 

$19.75 AND $22.50 SUITS $14.75 

$15.00 AND $17.50 SUITS $10.75 

Women's Cfkf^t^ $ft.75 

and Misses' \^UCll» vM.-f' 

$12.75 and $15.00 Values ^ 

$17.50 AND $19.75 COATS $12.75 

$22.50 AND $25.00 COATS $19.75 

Smart White Coats in Chinchilla, Bedford or Serges, $19.75 
to $35.00. 

Handsome Street or Evening Dresses reduced to $16.75, 
$19.75 and $25.00; former $25.00 to $35.00 values. 

Novelties in Colored and White Dresses reduced to $15.00, 
$19.76 and $25.00; formerly $19.75 to $32.50. 

Distinctive displav of Summer Dresses specially priced at 
$5.00, $7.60, $8.76, $i0.00 and up. 



GREAT SHOWING OF NEW WAISTS 

Novelties in Fancy Silks, Crepe Voiles, 
Crepe de Chines — amazing variety at— 



$5 & $6.50 




New Net and Lace Waists specially priced at $8.75. 
Dainty Lingerie Waists, very attractive, at $3.75. 

Note the Bargains in Waists 



One tableful all 
new Summer Waists 
to close out at — 



75c 



One tableful Pret- 
ty Summer Waista 
at only — 



One tableful lat- 
est creations dainty 
materials — 

$1.69 



$1.50 Balkan Middy Blouses, all sizes, __.9Sc 



98c 





3: 



r^s3C 



D. H., May 23, 1913. 




$19.50 <f^ $19.50 



e "Triple C." Suit 



The rising Star among the Suit Specialists 
found on Superior street. It shines with a 
$25 magnitude. Shown in a score of hand- 
some patterns, either Norfolk or plain models 

THE COLUMBIA 




$19.50 




$19.50 



DULUTH CHORUS 
WILL TOUR EUROPE 

Will Spend Two Months in 

Norway, Sweden and 

Finland. 

The Duluth Elite Male chorus will 
leave Thursday for a two months' tour 
of Finland and the Scandinavian pen- 
insula. 

The chorus which Is made up of 



twenty-two Dululh Finnish-American | 
citizens will g-o first to Minneapolis. 
They will sing there on Decoration day. 
A concert will be given by them in 
Chicago on June 1 and on June 3 they 
will sing before President Wilson at 
Washington. The final concert will be 
given In New York on June 4. 

It Is expected to pick up a number 
of other voices In Minneapolis. Chi- 
cago and New York. The party will 
leave for Europe on June 5 on the 
steamer Helllg Olav, and will appear In 
concert at Chrlstlania. Norway, on June 
16. On June 17 they will sing In 
Stock'holm and on June 19 at Helslng- 
fors, the capital of Finland. 

•'Boost Duluth" will be the slogan 
which will be carried with the party. 
Slnfrid Mustonen. director of the 
chorus, saia this morning that the 




SUMMER ^ 
FOOTWEAR 

At Cut Prices 

$2.50 Cut to $1.98 
$3.00 Cut to $2,39 
$3.50 Gut to $2,69 
$4.00 Cut to $2,98 

This cut applies 
to every pair of 

WOMEN'S 
Pumps «■><> Oxfords 

in the store as well 
as every pair of 

Men's Oxfords 



i«=(S®IPIlIi rS?*"cS. 17EF 

WHERE YOU GO-PHER SHOE REPAIRING 



members of the party expected to bring 
back with them a boat load of good 
citizens. They expect to spend a month 
In Finland and appear in about twenty 
concerts In their native land. They 
expect to return early In August. 



NEGROES WILL HONOR 
HENDERSON'S MEMORY 



Remember Author of Fif- 
teenth Amendment to 
Constitution. 

Washington, May 23. — Negro lead- 
ers from many states are arriving in 
Washington today to pay homage to 
Former Senator John B. Henderson of 
Missouri, who died here recently and 
who was the author of the thirteenth 
amendment to the Constitution of the 
United States, abolishing slavery. Ar- 
rangements for the ceremonies, to be 
held tonight In the ^Metropolitan A. M. 
B. church, have been prepared and 
several thousand members of the col- 
ored race including negro rellgrlous 
and secret societies and civic organ- 
izations, will be present 

Cardinal Gibbons and many high 
government officials and members of 
congress have been invited to attend 
the services. 



MAN IS HANGED TO 
CURE BROKEN NECK 



Severe Treatment Is Ad- 
ministered Victim of Car 
Collision. 

San Francisco, Cal., May 23. — Encased 
In a plaster cast. Paul V. Parker of 
Napa Is hanging by his neck In a hos- 
pital here, and there he will continue 
to hang until he Is well. 

Injured five days ago In a street car 
collision, he walked the streets four 
days with a broken neck and didn't 
know It. An examination showed that 
he had a bad fracture of the sixth 
vertebra. Only the muscles were hold- 
ing the neck in place, and a movement 
of a sixteenth of an inch of the broken 
bones probably would have caused 
death. 

Parker will get well, unless physi- 
cians are wrong. If he does, his will 
be the second case of its kind on rec- 
ord. It is said. 



DO NOT FEAR 
THE HOODOO 



"Friday, June 13, 1913," 
Will Be High School Com- 
mencement Day. 

Closing Exercises in Grade 

Schools Set for the 

Same Day. 



Friday, June 13, 1!)13. Is commonce- 
;i!ent day for the stnlor class of the 
l^uluth Central high school. 

Though many might consider them 
under a triple hoodco, those members 
of the class who arc handed diplomas 
( n commencement night will feel just 
iiK confident of beini? able to conquer 
in the world's battlts as though they 
were graduating or any other day. 
:hose who fall to get through will 
probably blame It or the hoodoo, but 
g' nerally the rising generation has no 
attachment to superstition. 

June 13 is tne closing day for all 
public high and gra-le schools In Du- 
luth, and teachers and students are 
prepaiing for the close of school. The 
largest class in history will graduate 
from the Central hlg.i school this year. 
The exact number lias not been de- 
termined, but It will be in the neigh- 
borhood of l.')0. The largest class 
previously numbered 134. 

The class night exercises at the Cen- 
tral high school will be held Wednes- 
day evening, June 11. The Junior- 
senior party, the bi? social event of 
commencement week, will be held on 
Thursday evening, .June 12, and the 
commencement exercises will be lield 
Friday evening,, June 13. 

A class of about twenty-five will 
graduate from the Industrial higli 
school at West Duluth this year. Thi 
exercises will be held on Thursday, 
June 12. 

The closing exerc ses In the grade 
schools will be held Friday afternoon, 
June 13. The various classes will hold 
their exercises In thpir own buildings, 
the plan of having C'^ntral exercises at 
the high school building having been 
abandoned last year. 

VINCENT will 

BE THE SPEAKER 



President of University Will 

Be Heard Here 

July 4. 



George E. Vincent, 
nesota university, wi 
speaker at the Fourt 
tion planned by the 
ety for the Nation; 
nouncement to this 
this morning by L. 
retary of the genera] 
is planning the prog 

A meeting will be 
at Mr. Slmonson's of 
building, at which th 
tee will outline the 
planned to have the 
anu musical program 
curling rink, after 
will be taken to th« 
grounds, where the 
will take place. 



president of Min- 
11 be the principal 
h of July celebra- 
"Mindegave" soci- 

il holiday. An- 

effect was made 
A. Simonson, sec- 

oommlttee which 
ram. 

held this evening 
flee, 308 Columbia 
e general commit- 

program. It Is 
principal speaking 

take place in the 
which the crowd 
! Duluth Ski club 
sporting program 



BEMIDJI WILL 

GREET EDITORS 



Annual Gathering of North- 
ern Minnesota Editorial 
Association June 13. 

Bemidji, Minn., Mgy 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Secretary A. G. Rut- 
ledge of the Northern Minnesota Edi- 
torial association, announces the pro- 
gram for the annual meeting to be 
held here June 13-5 for which the 

people of Bemidji ai'e making elabor- 
ate plans, in the way of entertainment 

The program for the three days is a 
varied one. There ■will be motor boat 
trips amidst beautiful scenes; auto 
trips to up-to-the-minute farm homes; 
smoker and reception for the men 
folks: reception and entertainment 
for the ladles of the party. Sunday. 
June 15, will be tht real gala day of 
the outing, when there will be a spe- 
cial train that will jonvey the editors 
and their ladles to Redby. on the 
shores of Red lake, for a ride on that 
great inland sea; a visit to the Red 
Ijake Indian agency, where Red L»akt 
Chippewas will give a war dance and 
hold a pow-wow. "The train will re- 
turn to Bemidji in ample time to make 
connections with all outgoing trains 
Sunday night. 

The program follows: 

Friday, June 13. — Receiving visitors 
and informal getting acquainted, with 
attendance at the sessions of the uni- 
versity week, in the afternoon. Eve- 
ning, visit to the plant of the Crook- 
ston Lumber company. 

Saturday. June 11 — Forenoon, auto 
rides to points of 1 iterest In Bemidji 
and vicinity. Including W. G. Schroe- 
der's alfalfa dairy farm. Afternoon, 
motor boat ride on Lake Bemidji and 
down the Mississippi river to the 
power dam. 

Judge Stnntoti to Preside. 

Evening — Smoker and get-together 
for the men folks at the Commercial 
club rooms. Reception and entertain- 
ment for the ladles at the Carnegie 
public library. Judge C. W. Stanton 
former president cf the Minnesota 
State Editorial association, will pre- 
side at the smoker, and there will be 
brief addresses of welcome by Bemld- 
jians, with responses by editors and 
other prominent visitors. Mrs. San- 
born, daughter of Jadge Stanton, will 
preside at the ladles affair, the details 
of which are being kept a profound 
secret from "us men folks." 

Sunday, June 15 — 10 a. m. Trip by 
special train to Redbv, with boat ride 
on Red lake (the largest body of 
fresh water wholly within the Lfnltrd 
States), and visit tc Red Lake Indian 
agency, one of tho most beautiful 
spots in Minnesota, where a band 
of native Red I>ake Chippev.as 
(in charge of John Morrison, Jr., of- 
ficial interpreter of all Minnesota 
Chippewas and Waller F. Dickens, In- 
dian agent at Red Lake) will give a 
war dance and hold a pow-wow, dur- 
ing which "Dad" Pta$e of the Anoka 
T'nlon. CTlaude M. Atkinson, A. M. 
Welles of the Sauk Ontre Herald, and 
Georgo F. Authler, will be given the 
Grand High Chippewa degree and 
made members of t>ie band. Return to 
Bemidji late In everlng. 

CALUMET MANHONORED. 

Rev. Daniel Stalker Chosen Delegate 
to Scotland Churcl) Conference. 

Calumet, Mich., TAay 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Rev. ckniel Stalker of 
the First Presbyterlani church of Calu- 
met, has been named ^ne of the three 
delegates from Miohlfean and one of 
the 121 from the United States to at- 
tend the Pan-Presbyterlan conference, 



May 23, 1913. 





ilberstein& 

Company 

Hunareafl of Beautiful 

NeAV' xV^aists 

On Sale Tomorrow- 
Regular Values $1.50 and $1.78 
at— 

9Sc 

Cases upon cases have been 
coming in this past week of 
these exquisite waists. Of course 
we fully intended marking them 
as good $1.50 and $1.75 values, but we decided to give our patrons 
A GREAT BIG BARGAIN. You will say when you see them 
"what a treat to get such beautiful waists at such low price." 
Mostly Voiles and Crepes; many have touches of colors, velvet 
bows, tucked bosoms; many with Cluny lace trimmings, and 
dozens of other styles. 

Tke ^^omen'fl Inexpensive Unc[er^vear Department 
On tlie Main Floor Offers for TomorroAV 

Beautiful 






Nigktg 



o^vns 



AT- 



$i.oo 




Floor 



(Regular $1.50 and $1.75 Values) 

We are offering them to introduce our new Muslin Underwear Department on the Main 
They are made of fine cambric, ribbon trimmed; many styles in crepes also. 



Fine Nainsook and Soft Cambric Skirts, in vari- 
ous dainty styles of embroidery and lace trim- 
mings; regular $1.50 and $2 values, 
at $1.50 and 

(Main Flour.) 
SO CORSETS— Long hip, medium bust, /^Q 
for average figure; very special value at. . . . 0*/C 

(Main Floor.) 



$1.00 



Beautiful New Style Boudior Caps 

at $1.75, $1.50 and 

(Main Floor.) 



$1.25 



^^any other good values shown in the line 
of Gowns, Drawers, Combinations and Slips. 

(Mala Floor.) 



Beautiful NcAV Millinery 

Entirely different from what you see elsewhere. Have you seen our display of beautiful 
Mid-summer Millinery? A wonderful showing of Leghorns, Panamas and fine straws. 
Hats for the graduates and brides featured. 



For tke Woman Who Wants a Practical Eponge 

or Linen Suit. 

Styles of slightly bloused coat effects with closely fitting peplum; others have a short 
cutaway; another is straight and jaunty-looking. Sometimes a high waist-line is suggested by 
the placing of the buttons. 

Various linens are used — the ramie, the heavy "rope linen" which is splendid for travel- 
ing; all these in enchanting colors, such as French pink, flax blue, rose, tan, oyster white, etc. 

Linen Suits range in price from $8.75 to $22.50 
Eponge Suits range in price from $12.50 to $24.50 



Special Sales. 

Suits at tremendous reductions. 

Entire stock of this season 's col- 
ored Trimmed Hats of high class, 
from our own workrooms, at less 
than cost. 

Skolny's Coats for Girls from 8 
to 16 years, reduced one-fourth and 
one-third. 



For Graduation 

Snadow Lace Dresses 

Positively the new dress of the season. 
These were bought by our Mr. Silberstcin on 
his recent trip east and are the last word in 
dressdom. Indeed, they promise to supplant, 
to some extent, the lingerie dress of past 
seasons. 

$23.75 — Of dainty shadow lace, white or cream 
trimmed with sash of light blue, rose 
or white, triple flounce skirt. 

$27.50 — Of white shadow lace, draped skirt. 
Sash and trimming of Copenhagen blue 
Satin. 

$32.50 and $35.00— Exquisite Lace Dresses 
daintily trimmed and draped. 



which win open at Aberdeen, Scotland, 
on June 18. The other Michigan dele- 
trateB are Dr. Black of Detroit and Dr. 
Stark of Saginaw. Dr. Stalker will 
also attend the conference of the In- 
ternational Sunday School association 
at Zurich. Switzerland, in July. 

On June 7 the annual convention of 
the Keweenaw Peninsula Sunday 
School association will meet at the 
First Presbyterian church, Calumet. 
Three thousand Sunday school children 
are expected to come from outside 
points and there will be a parade In 
which more than 6^000 children, each 
class carrying distlnpruishing banners, 
will march. This will be the biggest 
gathering of the kind ever held in the 
state outside of D etroit. 

COUNTY RETIRES 

BLOCK OF BONDS 



A $65,000 block of the $600,000 court- 
house bond Issue was retired yester- 
day by County Auditor Odin Halden. 
The taking up of the bonds was au- 
thorized at a recent meeting of me 
county commissioners. 

Auditor Halden issued a warrant for 
$r.6,381.93. which Included a premium 
of $1 381.93, which the county had to 
pay in order to retire the bonds at this 
time. The bonds are a part of a ten- 
year issue which docs not mature until 
May 1, 1918. By taking them up now, 
the county will save the difference be- 
tween the premium and five years' in- 
terest, at 4% per cent, a sum of about 
$12 375. 

Two weeks ago the county retired 
$20,000 worth of the same issue. 

warroadto'have 

e lectr ic plant. 

Warroad, Minn., May 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — At a tpecial election the 
citizens decided to issue the village 
bond.'i In the sum of $30,000 foj- the 
purpose of erecting an electric light- 
ing plant and water works. The propo- 
sition carried by a vote of 101 in favor 
to 18 against. Work on the plant will 
be commenced as soon as the bonds are 

sold. 

* 

"Dick Wlthlngton and His Cat," 

three-reel feature for the children at 

ike Ly'ceum tomorrow. 



/^# 



DAY CLOTHES 

for 
MEN, WOMEN 

AND CHILDREN 
on 

EASY CREDIT 

No reason why you should 
hesitate a minute about walk- 
ing right in and buying your- 
self some new clothing for 
the holiday. Newest styles. 
Lowest prices. Buy now 
and pay later. Everybody 
welcome at this store. 



The Menter Co. 

122 East Superior St 

Open Saturday Nl^lit Till 10 p. ni. 




J 



-^-'^^' 



GO TO THE 

ORIGINAL 

$15 TAILORS 

— the only store in 
town where you 
can get 

REAL $25 

SUITS 

, MADE TO ORDER 

k 



The old reliable 
Glasgow Woolen 
Mills. Our imitators 
win do their best lo 
confuse you. To 
protect yourself, re- 
member THIS name 
and address. 



TO WET TO 
SPREAD OIL 

Work on Streets Is Delayed 
By the Frequent 

Showers. 



Use of Oil Will Be Greatly 

Extended This 

Season. 



GEO. U. MILLS. Mauaicer. 

333W.SUP.ST. 



''-Ol^ai4MTC0-«OI»-kJ. 



MAIL OKUh;KS — WHt* for free 
le« and •elf-nicaaurlus; blaoks. 



HIGH SCHOOL BOARD 
APPROVES AID LIST 



State Funds Will Be Avail- 
able to Many In- 
stitutions. 

St. Paul, Minn.. May 23.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The state high school 
board at its me^tlngr with C. O. Schulz. 
superintendent of education, today ap- 
proved of the hig^h and grade schools 
which are authorized to conduct 
couraes In agriculture and Industrial 
work for the next school year and to 
establish teachers' training- depart- 
ments. 

The list approved Includes forty-four 
high and grade schools to receive in- 
dustrial aid of $2,500. ninety to receive 
aid of $1,800 and 105 high schools in 
which teachers' training departments 
are authorized. 

The board ruled that new schools 
listed for Uie $2,500 aid must, as one 
condition, have a territory of eighteen 
flections, or vote to associate or con- 
eolidate with rural old schools so as 
to have a territory of that extent. The 
retjuirement becomes effective one year 
from now. 

Siipt. Schultx announced the appoint- 
ment of S. A. Challman. Inspector of 
graded schools, to become a special as- 
fllstani In his office as school building 
commissioner, a position authorized by 
tile last legislature. 
» 

In a dispute over who should take 
up the collection in a Uniontown. Pa., 
ohurch twenty-tive persona were cut 
and bruised. 



Susrar-producing countries of the 
world are exporting 13.000,000.000 
pouiid.s of It to other land.<? each year. 

Spring Time Is 

Blood Cleaning Time 

Wonderful How Quickly Your Entire System 
Awaicen* When the Blood is Cleansed. 



The antics of J. Pluvlus and the 
bashfulness of Old Sol are raising hub- 
bub with tlie plana of the works divi- 
sion for laying oil on the city streets 
for the purpose of laying the dust In 
lieu of water sprinkling. 

Two cars of the oil are now on rail- 
road sidetracks, and If the weather 
does not change they will have to re- 
main tliere, while the demurrage b'll 
accumulates at the rate of |1 Per day 
for each car at the expiration of five 
days. The oil cannot be laid until the 
streets are dry. 

George J. Bloedel, superintendent of 
street maintenance, estimates that 
80,000 gallons of the road oil will be 
laid 'n Duluth this season. The use of 
the oil la to be greatly extended this 
year. Supt. Bloedel estimates that it 
win be spread on twelve to thirteen 
miles of street, as compared with less 
than two miles a year ago. Oil will be 
la'd on the same streets as last year 
as wtll as upon those where chloride 
was formerly used, while several are 
l>elng added. Among those where the 
lil will be used are London road, First 
street from Sixth to Twenty-third 
avenue east. Second street from Thir- 
teenth to Twenty-third avenue east. 
Fifth street. Sixth street and Wood- 
land avenue from Fourth street to Ox- 
ford avenue. 

The cost of the oil Is considerably 
less than that of sprinkling with 
water, despite the fact that it costs 
5.14 cents this season, or about a cent 
more a gallon than a year ago. As it 
contains about 40 per cent of asphalt 
it also helps to Improve the surfaces 
of the highways on which it Is used, 
giving them a more permanent char- 
acter. In cities where the road oil has 
been used for several years the streets 
are smooth and are kept In flrst-class 
condition at little expense, while the 
dust nuisance Is reduced to a mini- 
mum. 

Considerable work Is being done on 
First and Second streets in prepara- 
tion for the oil. Crushed rock is be- 
ing placed and rolled and the rough 
places smoothed. First street Is being 
fixed up from Slxtli avenue east to 
Twenty-third avenue east and Second 
street from Thirteenth avenue east to 
Twenty-third avenue east. Some work 
is also being done on the other streets, 
but the funds will not permit of all of 
them being put In the condition de- 
sired by the works division. The use 
of the oil is confined to the eastern 
end of the city as the streets In that 
section are better suited for its appli- 
cation than those in the western part. 
• 

Excursion Fares to Fishing Resorts. 

D. S. 3. & A. railway has authorized 
the usual low week-end excursion fares 
to Lake Nebagamon. Iron River, Delta, 
Cu-saon. Blbon, etc. Tickets on sale 
for Saturday night aa well as Sunday 
morning train and will be made valid 
for return passage until Monday a. m. 

MAY INSTALL 

BELL TELEPHONES 



Independent System May 

No Longer Have City 

Hall to Itself. 

The city commission may break away 
from the long-established rule of hav- 
ing only the new telephone in the city 
hall. 

Some of the commissioners want the 
old telephone put In their offices. They 
state that they are Inconvenienced fre- 
quently because but one system Is 
available and that the same Is true of 
many citizens who wish to communi- 
cate with the city hall. 

"The matter of putting In the old 
telephone will be taken up when the 
repairs to the city hall are completed, 
under way," said Mayor Prince this 
morning. "If It is decided to put In 
the old telephone it can be done along 
with the remodeling. I believe it 
should be put in, but there is some op- 
position to it." 




Railroads 



LOW RATES TO 

THE CARNIVALS 



liH: S. :>. a. Rid You of All Blood 
Diaordetm. 

If you are down with rheumatism; 
Jf you sneeze, feel chilled, are choked 
with catarrh, have a cough, or your 
fkin is pimpled and Irritated with 
rash, eczema, or any other blood dis- 
prder, just remember that almost all 
the ills of life come from impure 
blood. And you can easily give your 
blood a good, thorough cleansing, a 
bath, by using S. S. S. There is no 
need for anyone to be despondent over 
the illness of blood Impurities. No 
matter how badly they attack the sys- 
tem, or how unsightly becomes thd 
pkln. just remember there ia one In- 
grredient in S. S. 3. that so stimulates 
the cellular tissues throughout the 
body that each part selects Its owdi 
essential nutriment from the blood. 

This means that all decay, all breakJ 
Ing down of the tissues, la checked and 
repair work begins. S. 3. 3. has such 
a specific influence on all local cells aa 
to preserve their mutual welfare and 
afford a proper relative assistance to 
each other. More attention Is belngr 
given to constructive medicine than 
ever before and 3. 3. S. Is the highest 
echievemerrt In this line. For many 
years people relied upon mercury; 
Iodide of potash, arsenic, "physics." 
cathartics and "dope" aa remedies for 
blood sickness, but now the pure, 
vegetable S. 3. S. Is their safeguard. 

You can get S. S. S. in any drugr 
store, but Insist upon having it. And 
you should take no chance by per- 
mitting anyone to recommend a sub- 
stitute. And if your blood condition 
is such that you would like to con- 
sult a specialist freely and conflden* 
tlally, address the Medical Dept., The 
Swift Specific Company, 137 Swift 
BIdg.. Atlanta, Oa. 



Great Northern Will Help 

"Lark o' the Lake" 

Committee. 

The Great Northern railroad has 
agreed to offer rates of a fare and a 
third to Duluth for the Lark o' the 
Lake entertainments to be given dur- 
ing the summer. 

The other railroads leading Into Du- 
luth are expected to fall Into line so 
that a uniform rate of 2 cents a mile 
mav be offered to people in the vi- 
cinity of Duluth aa an Inducement to 
them to take In the week-end enter- 
tainments. 

The members of the committee are 
delighted with the success of the ap- 
plication to the Great Northern, aa the 
low rates will contribute greatly to 
the attendance at the Lark o' the Lake 
each week. 



JOHNSTON LAW TEST. 

Act Relating to Railroads Handling 
Cream Now in Courts. 

St. Paul, Minn., May 23. — A tempo- 
rary Injunction restraining railroads 
operating In Minnesota from refusing 
cream shipments under the Jonnston 
law, passed by the last legislature, un- 
til Its constitutionality can be tested, 
was Issued late yesterday by Judge 
Willarrl of the United States district 
court. 

The Johnston law prohibits the ship- 
ment of cream more than alxty-flve 
miles unless It Is in refrigerator cars or 
rroperly pasteurized. Dealers who 
asked for the restraining order de- 
clared the law discriminates against 
centralizing plants, that It was passed 
at the request of the country cream- 
eries, and that Its enforcement would 
seriously Interfere with their business. 
. — ^ — 

Claim Agents Pick St. Paul. 

Baltimore, Md.. May 23. — St. Paul, 
Minn., was selected for next year's 








Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 23, 1913. 



jlf on Tailored SfSJ^ll II 

Made to your mca.'^ure, with or without high 
waist line, pleated, draped or plain tailored; 
perfect fit and absolute satisfaction guaran- 
teed. 

Wash Goods Materials $2.00 

Woolen Materials $2.50 

(For the Making.) 



Melrose 2 155 -BOTH PH0NES-Grand522 




Heautiful W^all Paper 



"THr: c'i:vTFK of economy for thrifty people." 

The Store Where Satisfaction Follows Every Transaction. 



r 

■ An immense variety of patterns and a 
H wealth of beautiful colorings are here in the 
H best domestic and foreign makes, and priced 
H right. Estimates made and competent work- 
H men supplied. Get our prices. 



Qreat Qlearance ^ale—0ur fl] ntire gtocfc of Qoats 

Supplemented by manufacturers' sample lines, which add variety without limit 
Owing to the fact that in this showing many of the bargains are "one of a kind," 
we shall be obliged to decline approvals. Sale starts Saturday morning and 
you have unrestricte^d choice of over 250 new coats — FIVE BIG LOTS, viz : 



$15 Coats Nqw $10 



One Lot of Nobby Junior Cutaway Coats, in 

all-wool checks, also new Balkan Blouses, in 

reds, greens and blues; have sold at $15.00; 

clearance sale price, 

special 



$10.00 



$25.00 Coats Now $16.95 

The greatest Coat values of the season. 100 Nobby 
Coats, cutaway styles, in stylish, refined models, in 
blacks and colors — beautifully lined with rich colors 
of peau de cygne, in strictly straight line models. 
This is the smartest coat of the season; regular 
value $25.00; clearance sale 
price 



$16.95 



Clearance S5[? of S^its 

A BARGAIN EVENT in highest class suits such as are 
only found here. Fine custom-made suits, mjin-tailored 
suits, silk suits, ratine and eponge suits, diagonals and other 
high grade fabrics; made in latest models of this season. 
READ THE LIST. 

$69.50 and $59.50 SUITS NOW....' $35.00 

$45.00 and $37.50 SUITS NOW $29.50 

$35.00 and $32.50 SUITS NOW $22.50 

$22.50 and $19.50 SUITS NOW $15.00 




$19.50 Coats Now $15 

One Lot of All-lined Coats, in diagonals, Ratines, Bed- 
ford Cords and Whipcords — colors black, tan, browns, 
Copenhagen, navy, two-toned grays and figured mate- 
rials — all satin lined, and regularly /t% -« f^ /^/^ 
sold at $19.50; clearance sale price. . .%p A. t^«vr v/ 



$32.50 C oats Now $19.50 

One Lot of Dressy Coats, with draped sides, long re- 
vers, in the smartest length of the season, in blues, 
blacks and fancies — all lined throughout with shim- 
mering glace silks, beautifully tailored and perfect 
fitting; well worth $32.50 



now . 



$19.50 



$35 to $42.50 C oats $25.00 

Come early for first choice of 75 of the highest grade 
coats ever shown in this city; plain tailored, semi-dressy and 
very dressy coats, in ratines, poplins, cords, diagonals, mate- 
lasses, summer chinchillas, imported brocades and fancies; 
every garment positively exclusive and only shown here; all 
colors, also black and white; every £]% ^^ f^ d\d\ 
one a great value; we repeat, $3S.()0 .^ ^j1\ , 1 f ■ f 
to $42.50 coats now t^A^*-r«vrvr 



^ Si hoes! C hildren's Shoesf\ 

SHOES FOR CHILDREN SHOULD BE 
GIVEN VERY CAREFUL ATTENTION 

Care should be taken that the children's feet are not warped 
and cramped. You avoid all this first, last and all the time 
in getting children's shoes here. Comfortable, sturdy, 
stylish, serviceable shoes underpriced. We mention 
but a few. There are many others. 




Clearance S^l£ S treet and Q ress H ^ts \>j 
at H^lf P rice 



Hats of Striking Prettiness and Individuality 



Misses* Dress Shoes 
$2.50 Kind $1.79 

Misses' Hand turned Shoes, patent 
and vici kid; plain toes or tipped; 
button or lace styles; sizes lljA to 
1 ; regular price $2.50, ^ •* ^70 
Saturday special. . . . ^p J. % § %f 

Shoes for Baby 

Babies' Patent Ankle Ties — Light 
soles ; sizes 2 to 5>4 ; regular price 
$1.00, Saturday /JflTy* 

special OOO 



Little Gents' Shoes 
$1.75 Kind $1.39 

Little Gents' Shoes of box calf, 
heavy soles, broad toes; blucher 
style; sizes 8^ to 13^; regular 
price $1.75, Saturday ^ ■* QO 
special -^ J, •0£/ 

Women's Shoes 

Odd Ion Women's 4-button Oxfords, 
patent vamps, with velvet foxed ; 
size^ 2 j-^ to 6 ; reg- ^ f O ^ 
ularly $3, Saturday. . ^ X •Sl/O 




Now is the time above all others to secure an 
artistic up-to-the-minute hat way under price 

The women of Duluth who know and appreci- 
ate the value of artistic head-dress will be the 
most enthusiastic about these extraordinar}' val- 
ues. 

100 Hats worth $10.00 and $15.00 in two lots— 



$10.00 Artistically 
Trimmed Hats — 

$5.00 



$15.00 Beautiful 
Dress Hats — 

$7.50 



Children's Hats 

Don't forget the children. We 
carry the largest assortment in the 
city, and everything that is new is 
here, specially priced at 

$1.00 to $5.00 



Embroidered fp reimuth's G uaranteed 

J)ress P atterns 



An unusually fine collection of Em- 
broidered Mercerized Batiste Dress 
Patterns splendidly suitable for gradu- 
ation and summer dresses. These pat- 
terns contain 3>^ yards of 45-inch 
flouncing, 2^/^ y^rds of band trimming 
and enough plain material for a waist. 
They come in white, pink, blue and 
helio embroidery. Ordinarily these pat- 
terns would sell at $5, ^ O /JO 
extra special %P^ • f30 

p iouncings 

45-inch Batiste Skirt Flouncing; reg- 
ular $1.50 quality, spe- 
cial tomorrow 

$1.85 quality, special 
tomorrow 



The Best Wearing 
Stockings Made 

Women's Glorita Silk Hose look 
like silk and wear better. Note: 
They are sold with this guarantee 
— if for any reason they prove un- 
satisfactory we ask you to return 
them and get new ones in ex- 
change — no time limit, no ques- 
tions asked. We leave it entirely 
to 3''0ur own sense of fairness. 

The best Hosiery Bargain on the 
conrinent. 

Box of 4 Pairs 




$i.so\ 'I'OO 




Elastic 

Double Top 

Stop Ron 
Garier Welt 



Glorleta 
' Silk Lisle 



Full Fash- 
ioned. Per- 
fect Flttinf 



Reinforced 

Hlgh^spUccd 

Heels 

Full 
Fashioned 



Triple Soles 



Hose 



Children's 

Silk Lisle 

Dress Stockings 

Children's very fine rib- 
bed silk-lisle Dress Stock- 
ings, in pink, sky blue, 
red, tan and black and 
white ; sizes 5 to 9>^ ; reg- 
ular 35c quality, extra 
special tomorrow — 

25' 



\ 



Six Thread 



Extra Special 

An odd lot of Women's Street and 
Semi-Dress Hats, various styles that 
sold from $7.50 to $10.00, marked for 
quick clearance, only — 

$3.50 

W/^ omen's and C hildren* s 
f^ ummer J J nderwear 

WOMEN'S 25c VESTS 15c. 

Women's low neck sleeveless \'ests ; 
line ribbed, white cotton; plain or 
fancy yokes ; 25c kind, extra 
special tomorrow 

WOMEN'S 50c UNION SUITS 39c. 

Women's low neck, sleeveless, knee 
length, ribbed lisle Union Suits ; tight 
cuf? or lace trimmed knee; pure white ; 
regular 50c quality, extra 
special tomorrow 

CHILDREN'S VESTS AND PANTS 
Children's Fine Ribbed V>sts and 
Pants ; high neck, long or short sleeves 
— also low neck, sleeveless ; knee or 
ankle length pants, also knee pants, 
lace trimmed, special — 

2 to 6 years 15c 

7 to 10 years 20c 

11 to 16 years 25c 



15c 



39c 




r" 



convention of the Railway Claim 
agonta. W. B. Spalding of St. Louis 
was elected president. 

SWITCHMEN PUT 

UP RI GID BARS. 

Houston, Tex., May 23. — Hereafter 
members of the Switchmen's Union of 
North America who are also members 
of other labor organizations will not 
be accepted as delegates to the na- 
tional convention of the union. This 
was decided at the biennial convention 
of the organization. A propoaal that 
Buffalo, N. Y.. be made the permanent 
place of meeting of the national asso- 
ciation was defeated by a decisive 
vote. The next meeting place will bo 
chosen at a later date. 

The ladles' atilUary elected Mrs. Hen- 
rietta Clark, Kan.sas City, Mo., presl- 
il«nt: Mrs. Marv Stewart, Young.<3town, 
Ohio, vice president, and Mlsa .Sarah 
L., Jackson secretary-treasurer. 



Bring the children 
W^lthlngton and Hla 
Lyceum tomorrow. 



to see "Dick 
Cat" at the 



ADDITIONAL SPORTS 



SUPERIOR MAY GET 

$3,000 FOR SCHAUER. 

George W. McQuerr, representing the 
Chicago Nationals, yesterday watched 
"Rube" Schauer, Superiors pitching 
phenom, work agaln.'5t the Minneapolis 
league leaders In the thlrteen-lnnlng 
game which was tied 1 to 1 at the end 
of the twelfthl Sup<?rIor lost, gettint 
but two hits off Comfitock, but Schauer 
looked so good that. a bid was made for 
him on behalf of th j Cuds. 

fltovall of St. Louis Garry ITerrmann 
of Cincinnati, and a man named Gllll- 
gan of Chlcagw, rap.-osoiitlng another 
major league olub, are after flchauer. 
One bid of $3,000 Is iwld to have been 
made for his .eervt^ctss, providing Im- 
mediate delivery !« made. 

Last Touches on Yale Crew. 

New Haven. Conn., May 23. — With 
Capt. Snowdent baoJb at stroke in the 



first eight, after a brief absence from 
that position, the Yale varsity and 
other crews are being given their final 
preliminary drills here preparatory to 
leaving, six days hence, for their quar- 
ters at Gales Ferry, where the finish- 
ing work will be done for the race 
with Harvard next month. About thirty 
men will be taken to the quarters. 

HOUGHTON HIGH 

WIL L SEND CRACKS. 

Houghton, Mich., May 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The Houghton high 
school, whose athletes hold eight 
peninsula track ahd field records, will 
send a verj* fast and clever team to 
the Upper Peninsula meet at Marquette 
on May 81, Ch.vnoweth, of the local 
BChool, Is expected to break the shot- 
put record this year. The present rec- 
ord for the peninsula for high school 
meets is 88 feet 8»a Inches, Chyno- 
weth Is doing more than forty feet in 
his dally practices. The team will be 
made up as follows: Pfelffer, dis- 
tances ; Chynoweth, Alt and Rogers, 
weights; Wortlilng and McNalr, dashes; 



Nelson and McNalr, Jumps and vaults; 
Rogers and Pfelffer, middle distance. 

m 

Crews Are Chosen. 

Madison. Wis.. May 23. — Official an- 
nouncement of the personnel of the 
orews for tomorrow s race or one and 
one-half miles on Lake Mendota be- 
tween the Wisconsin varsity and the 
eight of the Minnesota Boat club of 
St. Paul, was made today as follows: 
Wisconsin — Position. Minnesota — 

Peterson bow Fleming 

MofTott 2 Connolly 

Clayton 8 Morgan 

Dexter 4 Baer 

Mueller 5 McGiU 

Bohated 6 FltzpatrUk 

Wlttlg 7 Cochran 

Pivert stroke Elb-rbe 

Lewis coxswain Slscho 

It will be the first crew rare of im- 
portance In the West this year. This 
Is the tlrHt year that the Minnesota 
olub has had the services of a profes- 
sional coach, and It is said the crew 
has made great progress under the 
new order. 

The Wisconsin freshman eight will 
be pitted against the St. John's military 
crew In a preliminary race. 



LIQUOR ORDINANCES 
HAVE BEEN REVISED. 

Attorney James A. Wharton, police 
prosecutor, has completed his revision 
of the liquor ordinances and has turne.i 
the draft over to Commissioner Hick- 
en. He has combined all ordinances in 
a single ordinance and incorporated 
the provisions of the state law whleh 
were missing from previous ordinances 

A revision of the patrol limits is also 
contemplated. As planned the saloons 
west of West Duluth will be confined 
to a territory two blocks wide, one 
on each side of Commonwealth ave- 
nue. Fond du Lac will be taken out 
of the patrol limits entirely. It is be- 
lieved that one of the saloons in the 
vicinity Is out of the present patrol 
limits. 

A third saloon will be allowed to lo- 
cate at New Duluth. although a peti- 
tion against the transfer has been re- 
ceived, but the number will not be al- 
lowed to Increase, at least for tha pres- 
ent. The police state the blind pigs 
which thrived about the steel plant ar« 
now out of business. 



- t 



A 



Friday, 







AMERICA'S GREATEST 
CLOTHING SFECIALISTd. 



BLUE 

SERGE 







WORTH $22.50 

ONLY 




Cfi, 



AT THE 



55 



Two and three-button 
coats, also Norfolks ; 
Trousers are cut peg top 
and semi-peg, with or 
without cuff bottoms. 
Materials are warranted 
fast colors and the coats 
are guaranteed to hold 
their shape. Our expert 
tailors will make any 
necessary alterations to 
insure a perfect fit free. 

All goods bought here 
we will keep pressed free 
of charge for two years. 




DINNERS 



|i|0 >I5 ^?0 



CI.OTIIIXG COMPAVY (Inc.) 

115 EAST SUPERIOR ST. 

(Opposite the City Hall.) 






The Carriage 
You Can Safely Buy 



You need not be a mechanic to 
select a carriage which will last 
through the two years baby 
needs it. The Sidtsay Guaranteed 
has the only spring that properly pro- 
tects baby's spine, because it is ad- 
justable to his increase in weight; 
large cushion tires of real rubber, not 
composition; hood of special quality 
Guaranteed Fabrikoid leather and 
every part, every material used in it 

Unconditionally Guaranteed 
For Two Yearg 

by the makers. The Sidway Mercan- 
UU Co., 1019 14th St, Elkhart, Ind. 

Before you make a selection, see the 

Adjustable Crib Spring 

Roomr Interior, Compact Folding 

High Quality of Materials 



See the Sld^vay at theae 
■tores: 

BAYHA Jt CO., 
Second Ave. W. and First St. 

ENGEIl A OLSOX, 
182S-1S32 West Superior St. 



I 



THURSDAY WAS 

EXCITING DAY 



Lie Passed in Wisconsin 

Assembly Over Free Text 

Bool< Discussion. 

Madison. Wis.. May 23. — Near the 
L-losf of a legislative day marked by 
many personal tilts. Assemblyman 
James Vint, a Milwaxikee Social Demo- 
cratic niomber, passed the lie to As- 
semblyman John I'aiilu, a Milwaukee 
non-j>artlsun member, last ni^bt. 
Sp.aklnK on the Socialist bill permit- 
tiukc titles to vote on the free text book 
•liHstion, f'aulu declared It emanated 
from sources antaKonlstic to churches. 

•When you make statements like 
that, you are sayinj? things you can't 
prove, and you know it, " declared Vint, 
shakinjf bis fist at Paulu. 

••When you say that," he said, "you 
are nothiuK more than a deliberate and 
uiuiualitlcd liar." 

Both meji were reproved by the 
speaker. 

BillM Pmkm AHMembly. 

The following bills were passed by 
the assembly: 

Crtatiny the town of Round l^kr, 
Sawyer county. 

Providing that graduates of county 
training schools may teach in any 
common school except where a state 
teacher's certificate is retiuired. 

Increasing the authority of fire and 
police commissioners in cities of tht 
third class. 

Authorizing cities ta regulate steam 
>)oilers and engines and to license their 
operators. 

For inspection of plumbing and 11- 
cenr.ing of plumbers by state board of 
heulth. 

The assembly passed the Kneen bill, 
requiring the obtaining of a certificate 
of convenlf-nce and necessity from the 
railroad commission for the duplica- 
tion of telephone lines In townships 
where only one exists. 

As amended, the bill provides that 
duplications may extend only to singU 
roads and not to entire townships. 
AVranKi^ Over Gnme AVarden. 

Friends and foes of the state gam* 
warden's department in the senate 
wrangled over the relative merits of 
that office as a force for good in th' 
state Service, and finally adopted an 
amendment to the finance committee 
bin on revision of salaries which in- 
crease the chief warden's salary from 
$1',000 to $2,500 per year. 

The bill gives the state officer.s and 
heads of commissions the right to em- 
ploy as many assistants as may be 
needed. 

The senate reconsidered its action in 
non-concurring in the Mlnkley bill firm- 
ing a minimum wage for rural school 
teachers at |40 per month and passed it 

Senator Cunningham's bill providing 
for the refunding of Illegally paid ci 
excessive Income taxes was passed. 



WIFE MUST CUT HER 
TOE NAILS SHORTER. 

Camden, N. J., May 23.— Vice Chan- 
cellor Learning directed Mrs. Wallace 
Fish to have her toenails cut and go 
back and live with her husband. Fish, 
in resLsting an order to pay alimony, 
testified that he had been compelled 
to leave his wife because she persisted 
in allowing her toenails to grow long 
and in using the weapons on him. 

The allegation not being refuted the 
court ordered the abuse abated and 
released Fi.«>h from paying alimony it 
Mrs. Fish refused to live with him and 
wear short toenails. 



FOSSTON MOTOR 

MEN HA VE CLUB. 

Fosston, Minn., May 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — At a meeting held In 
Cambell's garage, the automobile own- 
ers of Fosston, organized an automo- 
bile club and elected the following of- 
ficers; James Humphrey, president; 
Ray Cambell, vice president; John 
Mithum, treasurer, and Carl Thompson, 
secretary. 

Although having not over 1,200 in- 
habitants Fosston boasts a live Com- 
mercial club, about seventy-five auto- 
mobile owners and two garages. If 
the proposed road Is built between 
Grand Forks and Duluth the automo- 
bile club will be making a few trip.^ 
to these cities this summer, as the 
road will run two miles south of here. 



BURKE'S BROTHER 

MA DE CO LLECTOR. 

■Washington. May 22. — The senate 
has confirmed the nomination of Thom- 
as C. Burke for collector of customs 
at Portland and William C. Logan for 
collector of customs at Astoria. Burke 
is a brother of Former Governor Burke 
of North Dakota, nov/ United States 
treasurer. 

Unless the Taft reorganization order 
is rescinded. Burke will serve at a sal- 
ary of $6,000 until July 1, when his 
salary will be reduced to $4,500. 



FOR SALE 



NICE LIOHT 



5-ROOM HOUSE, 
CHEAP 

Inquire 211 East 5th Street, 

2nd Flat 



Aiiverlise in The Herald 



DOCTOR McBURNEY 

LOST I N SWAMP. 

Stockbridge, Mass., May 23. — After 
wandering for five hours in a wooded 
swamp in which he had lost his way, 
r>r. Charles McBurney, a noted New 
York scientist, the surgeon w^ho op- 
erated upon President McKinley at 
Buffalo, N. Y., was found by searcher.s 
wet, cokl and mud-bespattered, lie 
started on a fishing trip, and when he 
did not return to nis estate at night- 
fall his family became alarmed and 
.Martin Dooley, his farm superintend- 
ent, set out In search of him. He too, 
was shortly lost In the wilderness, 
and it was not until several houis 
later that a searching party of farmers 
found Dr. ilcBurney and Dooley to- 
gether. They had encountered each 
otlier in the swamp, but were unable 
to find their way out. The physician 
experienced no ill effects from the ex- 
posture. Dr. McBurney is 68 years old. 

CISTERN FULL OF 

HAR D CIDE R FOUND. 

Bonner Sjyrings, Kan., May 23. — Th.- 
discovery of a cistern filled with "hard " 
cider on a farm near here has solved 
a mysterj- that has baffled the law 
enforcement officers of Wyandotte 
county for more than a year. 

Frequent complaints have been filed 
with tlie prosecuting attorney that 
many men and boys in this vicinity 
were being ruined by strong drink, but 
the utmost vigilance on his part failed 
to locate either Joints or bootleggers. 

The cistern was found by one of the 
prosecutor's assistants who had been 
in the neighborhood a week dlsgused 
as a farm hand. A chemist's analysis 
showed that the elder was about 6 per 
cent pure alcohol. 

The farmer who owned the cistern 
was enjoined from selling or making 
cider, and the cistern and its contents 
were destroyed. 



Flood Coat Over |tl. 000,000. 

Roanoke, Va., May 23. — An official 
statement by the Norfolk & Western 
railway here says that 1.800 men for 
four weeks at an expenditure of more 
than $1,000,000 will be required to re- 
pair the property of the company as 
a result of the Ohio flood. A further 
txpendlture of $700,000 will be made 

to prevent losses under like conditions. 
• 

Bears Eat Runatffly Girl. 

Truckee, Cal., May 23. — After a 
week's search, the body of Miss Vinnle 
Colt, a girl of 18, was found late yes- 
terday in a ravine in the Sierra Ne- 
vadas, tw«nty miles from Truckee. She 
had been killed and partially devoured 
by a bear. The girl ran away from her 
home here on Wednesday of last week 
because of a disagreement with her 
mother, who Is 75 years old. 




THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 23, 1913. 



Such Values In Trunks and Suit Cases as These, Duluth 
Has Never Seen Before: Be Sure to Share in the Saving 



Candy Special 

Fresh Chocolates — As- 
sorted flavors, special for 
Saturday — 

Per Pound, 30c 



ClK 6la$$ Block Store 

"The Shopping Center of Duluth" 

Now, Just At An Opportune Time Comes a G reat Manufacturer's Sample Sale of High Grade 

Trunks & Suit Cases 

At a Saving of About V3 Below Regular Prices 

Therefore we commend to our customers the wisdom of coming early to be sure of one of these fine 
Trunks or Cases. These trunks and suit cases which go on sale are the samples of one of America's 
leading makers of high-grade luggage. 

They are the sort that will stand hard usage, being the show pieces. You may be sure 
that thev are made with extra care and materials used are the best. BELOW IS A 
^ ■ .PARTIAL LIST OF THE SAVINGS: 




$16.75 Trunks for $12 

Hartmann's famous "Gibraharized" trunk; 
the strongest trunk made; heavy brown can- 
vas covered; corners and binding of vulcan- 
ized fibre; a slatless model of unusually fine 
appearance; fitted with roomy tray and ex- 
tra dress tray; fancy linen lined ^1 ^ 
throughout; 36 inch; each *p 1 ^ 

$14.75 Vulcanized Fiber 
Trunks at 



$19.75 Trunks for $14 

A fibre trunk of distinctive design that will 
appeal to particular people; slatless, covered 
with brown vulcanized fibre; heavy trim- 
mings of cold-rolled brassed steel; equipped 
with metal hinged lid tray, set-in tray with 
hat carrier; extra flat tray below; ^ ^ /| 

cloth lined throughout; 38 in.; each *P It: 



While on your shopping 
tour tomorrow have lunch 
in our Fourth Floor 

Tea Rooms 

Splendid service, restful, home- 
like surroundings and unsurpassed 
cuisine, 

Stmi-private booths for business 
confc-rcnccs; smr)king pcrmittrd. 

Music by La Brosse's orchestra 
from 12 to 2 p. m. 

Special Table d'Hote Dtnner 
Saturday night from 6 to 8, at 75c. 

New Veilings 

Just in — a large assortment of 
new Veilings in all the favorite 
meshes and designs. 

Black, white, Nell rose, 
and the new blues; the 
yard 50c to 98c. 

NEW VANITY VEILS— In black 
and white embroidered and chenille 
dots; prices $1.25 to $1.75 each. 

WASHABLE AUTOMOBILE 
VEILING— 18 inche- wide. 

Regular 98c value; ^Q^^ 
special, per yard. XJ^JK^ 

NEW MALINE AND CHIFFON 
RUFFLING— Black, brown and 
navy, for neck ruffs; very new; the 
yard $2.25. 



$10.50 



$19.98 Reinforced Fiber 
Trunks at 



$13.48 Trunks $9.50 



Special narrow width trunk; stan- 
dard height but only 22 inches 
wide; green canvas-covered; nar- 
row hardwood slats; flat brassed 
steel corners; cloth lined through- 
out; hinged and covered tray ; ex- 
tra dress tray below; 
36-inch; each 



$9.50 



$14.00 Trunks $10.00 

Hartmann's famous rounded edge 
trunk, specially reinforced frame; 
dark green canvas-covered; vulcan- 
ized fiber binding; cold rolled 
steel trimmings; fitted with roomy 
top tray and extra dress tray below; 

ore!:ch'..'':°.".':":.$ 10.00 



$14.25 

$13.75 Trunks $9.75 $23.48 Trunks $16.75 



A long 40-inch skirt trunk that 
holds a skirt full length without 
folding; brown duck covered, heav- 
ily slatted with strong steel trim- 
ming; interior fitted with deep 
hinged top tray and extra dress 
tray below; cloth lined 
throughout; 40-inch ., 



$9.75 



High grade tan keratol-covered 
trunk; slatless style; black fiber 
binding; brassed steel trimming; 
deep tray with stylish latticed cov- 
er; extra dress tray; fancy linen 
lined throughout; perfectly fin- 
ished in every de- ^1 C 7^^ 
tail: 36-inch; each. . . «P 1 0« I i> 



$10.25 Trunks $7.30 

Sheet-steel covered; color brown; 
slatless construction; has appear- 
ance of high-class fibre trunk; fan- 
cy brassed trimmings; straps; cov- 
vered tray and extra dress tray; 
fancy paper lined; 36- dJ7 ^O 
inch; each %p § •0\J 



$7.75 Trunks at $5.55 

Steamer trunk; brown canvas cov- 
ered, fibre bound; hardwood slats 
across front and top; heavy straps; 
brassed steel trimmings; fancy pa- 
per lined; co\ere!l dress tray; 
36-inch; special at, d*C CC 



each. 



$11.48 Trunks $8.15 

Handsome green duck covered 
trunk of slatless style, with special- 
ly reinforced rounded top; thor- 
oughtly protected with heavy 
brassed steel trimmings and fibre 
bands; has hinged tray with extra 
dress tray below; fan- fl*0 1 C 
cy lined ; each kpO» 1 %J 



$11.75 Trunks $8.30 



A fibre-covered trunk built for 
hard service; reinforced with heavy 
hardwood slats and heavy brassed 
steel trimmings; fitted with cov- 
ered tray and extra dress tray be- 
neath; fancy linen lined through- 
out; 36-in^h; special, 
each 



$8.30 



$15.25 Canvas Covered 
Trunks 



$10.75 



$13.48 Brown Canvas 
Covered Trunks 



$9.50 



$13.75 Vulcanized Fiber 
Trunks at 



$9.75 



$2.25 Suit Cases at $1.89 

Light Koto matting suit case; leather 
corners and keratol bound edges; inside 
cloth lined; tape straps in d**! QQ 
cover; 24-inch size; each. . .*r "*■ •^•^ 



$2.98 Suit Cases at $2.39 

Strong but light case of best Koto mattmg; 
pressed steel frame gives rigidity; leather 
corners- keratol bound edges; leather straps 
all round; full cloth lined; 24- d*0 OQ 
inch size; each ntp£i»*JiJ 



$4.48 Suit Cases at $3.98 

A special value in a tanoid fiber case; 7- 
inch extra deep case; steel frame; leather 
corners and stitched leather d»0 OQ 
straps all round; 24-inch sizeM'*^*^*^ 



$2.98 Suit Cases $2.59 



Made of tanoid fibre; the strongest 
of leather substitutes; rigid steel 
frame; leather corners; leather straps 
all round; cloth lined; leather straps 
inside; 24-inch size; d*0 CQ 

each r... .^^•\J^ 

Matting case of Koto fiber; pressed steel frame gives rigidity; 



$2.25 Suit Cases $1.89 ! $1.25 Suit Cases 98c 

A sightly case of light weight 



A well-made tanoid fibre case that 
looks almost like leather; is just as 
strong and much lighter; strong steel 
frame; leather corners; leather han 
die; cloth lined with in 
side straps; 24-inch size 



$1.89 



metal 
corners prevent raveling and take hard wear; a very popular case for ladies use, 
24-inch; each 



Hofi matting; rigid steel franie 
and steel corners; fancy paper 
lined; 26-inch; QRc 

and 



ed^es 



$1.25 




Commencement 
Gift Books 

Every girl and boy will be 
delighted to own one of 
these Memory Books in 
which to keep a record of 
classmates, yells, colors, 
autographs, photo graphs, 
stunts, dances, etc. 

"Mv Golden S<iio<»l Days" 
"The Girl Graduate" 
••School Fellow Days" 
"My Fraternity" 
"My Alma Mater" 
"School Girl Days" 
"My Soi-ority" 
— All styles; all prices. 

Webster's Library 
Dictionary 

For house, school and office. 
Over 100,000 words, defini- 
tions and synonyms. Printed 
on good paper and good 
type; regular 75c dictionary. 
We have just 50 
copies to sell at. 

Stationery 
Specials 

Westmore Linen Fabric, 
smooth linen finish ; regular 
price 25c per pound, special 
Saturday 2 lbs. for 25c. 

Envelopes to match; reg- 
ular price 3 packages for 25c. 
special Saturday 5 packages 
for 25c. 



49c 



Men's 59c Union 

Just the right weight for present 
and summer wear; made of fine bal- 
briggan yarn, ecru color; nicely fin- 
ished, perfect fitting. 

MEN'S POROSKNIT Cotton Union 
Suits— In all sizes; regular $1.00 sort; 
on sale Saturday 79c 

for 

Men's Phoenix Silk 
Hose, 75c ^Qq 

Down to 

A hose noted for excellent wear, in 
all the wanted shades, such as gray, 
tan and black. 



Sale of 118 Women's Handsome Tailored Suits 



Men's Cotton Hose 
—Per Pair 



25c 



Shown in all the wanted new col- 
ors; made of fine selected cotton, 
with linen heel and toe, insuring ex- 
cellent wear. 

MEN'S MERCERIZED HOSE — 

Fine lisle, silk finish; the pair 35c and 
50c. 




That Sold From $25 $ 

On Sale Saturday 
at 



up to $47.50 




Makers' clearance and odd suits from our regular stock. Space must be 
made for the summer stocks, so we announce for tomorrow the clearance 
of about 100 of our best Spring Suits, onlv one or two of a kind — suits 

that formerly sold from $25.00 to $47.50 at $16.50. 

• 

One hundred and eighteen suits of Serges, Whipcords, Eponges, 
Wide Wales, Bedford Cords and fashionable mixtures in every 
fashionable color. The styles are plain tailored, one, two and • 
three-button cutaway styles, Balkan Blouse and semi-dress models, 
all beautifully finished; the linings are of fine Peau de Cygne. 
Regular $25.00 to $47.50 values for $16.50 



10 



.50 



Sale of Women's Coats $ 
$14.50 to $19.50 Value... 

In every fashionable material, plain and fancy ; in a large variety of smart 
styles to choose from — the ones and twos taken from regular stocks, all 
carefully tailored. 

Any woman who nood-s a coat should come and sc<^ these as they aro 
extraordinarily pootl values at the price — g-arments taken from our own 
good stock of lines that sold from $14.50 to $19.50 reduced to «10..'>0. 



25c Women's Sample Hose Ckg^ 



We Were Lucky 
in Securins: More 
of Those 

and Makers' Imperfectioni, to Sell at 

The first lot that went on sale yesterday sold out in a jifify. Women bought them by the 
dozen pairs. 

Those who were unable to avail themselves of the savings will have an opportun- 
ity to buy tomorrow, but if you want first choice, be early. 

ALSO MORE UNDERWEAR READY FOR SATURDAY. 
Women's Summer Vests— Plain 

or fancy — 15c and 20c values 



Q I One Lot of Summer Vests — 1 ^l/o/* 

.«/C ! Plain or fancy, regular 25c values m, £a t m^ 



I Women's Lisle Vests and Pants— Regular 50c values. __ 
25c and 35c Union Suits at 19c — Lace trirumed and tight knee style — pn sale in Basement. 



Sale of Men's Shoes Continues Tomorrow 

$4 and $5 Men's $0 Q C 
Shoes and Oxfords m«00 

The fact that this sale includes practically all size, 
and about all the wanted styles makes it the shoe- 
event of the season. Ii is practically an end-of-thc- 
season price for a first-of-the-season sale. It gives 
men an opportunity to buy shoes for a full season's 
supply at much less than the expected price. 

They are the broken lots and discontinued lines 
from regular stock, shoes made to our own speci- 
fication. Every pair backed by our guarantee. 

Button and lace shoes and oxfords in tan and gun 
metal; values to $4 and $5, special, $2.85. 




I 







t jMmmw f u t mtjM i ifi'im H'K 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 23. 1913. 




APPROVE TAX 
ON JNCOMES 

Senators Will Make No 

Change in That Part 

of Bill. 




May Sale Fith Unusual Price Reduclious! 




Williams, Shiveley and Gore 

Say Objections Were 

Met By House. 



"WashinBTton. May 23.— No amend- 
ment to the income tax section of the 
Underwood tariff bill. Is likely to be 
proposed by the senate finance com- 
mittee or the Demooratlc caucus. 

Senators Williams. Shiveley and Gore 
have the Income tax In hand. Though 
their committee room Is plied high 
with protests and eugs<?stlon3 from 
many sources, the measure is believed 
to have bten well handled in the house, 
and the objections made to it i" »" 
original form are thought to nave oeen 
BUiniiently met by amendments betore 
the bill passed the house. 

Among the loudest protests are 
those from mutual insurance compan- 
Ks conducted for profit, but the house 

- >c-d the original bill as relating to 

•«ce companies and Insurance 
...>i.^;.d. and the senators on the fi- 
nance committee, after a study of the 
bill ' 'i-ve that It is sound. 

( nts from railroad and other 

holu*.., companies that the law will 
tax them twice on dividends paid, are 
repo:ii-d to have been held unsound by 
members of the committee. 

Cotton Men and Ivory. 

Discussion of the tariff on raw ivory 
proposed in the Underwood bill before 
the Johnson subcommittee, disclosed an 
unusual situation. Representatives ot 
cotton exporters. In protesting af^'ainst 
the proposed 20 per cent duty on tusks, 
declared It would break up tlielr bar- 
ter trade In cotton with African tusk 
dealers. For years they have been 
Bhippine: thousands of dollars worth of 
cotton to these African traders anU 
bringing back in payment therefore 
Ivorv tusks which they, in turn, sold 
to piano manufacturers. It was claimed 
that with a duty on ivory. Italian cot- 
ton traders would get this business. 

Amendment of the bill in regard to 
the importation of feathers of birds 
also was considered by Senator John- 
eon's subcommittee. 

HEETERACGUSED 
BY STENOGRAPHER 

Former Employe Says He 

Patted and Kissed 

Her. 

Pittsburg. Pa.. May 23.— Mrs. Arthur 
H. Wessels. who was Alice Lang, a 
Btenotirapher In the office of Superin- 
tendent of Schools Sylvanlus U Heel- 
er, formerly of St. Paul, on tiie witness 
stand before the committee of citizens 
named by the board of education to 
probe rumors reflecting on Heeter. told 
her story of the educator's alleged mis- 
conduct, supplementing a recent affi- 
davit she had made. 

She said the superintendent had be- 
pun his attentions by patting her on 
the shoulder and playfully kicking her 
feet beneath her desk, and later had 
forcibly kissed her. She said she did 
rot re-sign at once because her salary 
was needed at home, and she feared If 
Bhe complained to the board of edu- 
cation her story would be contra- 
dl'^ted. ^ , , 

Finally, a week after the kiss, she 
said she revolted against working at 
right and the superintendent dis- 
charged her. , „„f 
Supt Heeter and his counsel sat 
through the recital and the witness 
was subjected to cross-examination 
durlnsr which she became confused as 
to dates. , ,, 

Arthur H "Wessels. husband of Mrs. 
T^'essels, and Dr. J. Chislang, an uncle 
bv marriage testified before the com- 
fnittee to the effect that they had 
heard the story of Supt. Heeter's al- 
leged Immorality after the girl had 
left her position. Dr. Lang said he 
had brought the matter to the atten- 
tion of James I. Buchanan, a member 
of the board of education, last July 
and 'Stated Mr Buchanan had informed 
him that "Heeter would have to resign 
within a week." , , ^ nc- 

An effort was made to have Mr. 
Buchanan appear before the commit- 
tee and testify, but Buchanan refused 

to do so. .. J „ 

The investigation was adjourned un- 
til Saturdav afternoon, when counsel 
for Heeter' will present the superin- 
tendent's defense. The final report ot 
the committee Is expected to be pre- 
sented to the board of education by 
Tuesday of next week. 

probe girlF pay. 

Missouri Senate Questions St. Louis 
store Employes. 

St. Louis. Mo.. May 23.— Floyd J. 
Bloan. manager of the City club, a 
philanthropic organization of St. Louis, 
told the Missouri senate wage investi- 
gating committee that the club, organ- 
ized for the general betterment of 



Unequaled values in Men's. Women's and Children's Outerwear for the last days of May and Decoration Day Week. 

No Woman Can Afford to Miss 



Men 



Men 




For Decoration 
Day 

Many of our regular custom- 
ers have already bought their 
suits. Many more will buy to- 
morrow. Hundreds of^ other 
people would buy, too, if they 
would only see the merchan- 
dise. We are showing as good 
values as can be bought at — 



take 




All the new models are shown at 
this store, the fashionable check, 
the novelties, English models with 

patch pockets; in fact, anything new that you may have 

in mind can be found at this store. 

A Blue Serge 

Some time ago we began to announce to the public facts 
regarding our Special Blue Serges. We told briefly what 
this suit wrs. We told of the tailoring features and the 
quality. We said it was a $20 value at $15. Today hun- 
dreds of men in this city are wearing these suits. We have 
been kept busy trying to supply the demand. If you are 
interested in a real good suit value and mean to buy a Blue 
Serge, come today, get an all wool <jt "f /^^ f^fh 

guaranteed suit for %p JL %>•"" 



These Big Savings 

PREPARE FOR NICE WEATHER NOW-THE RAINY DAYS ARE GONE. 

Whenever this store offers reductions on 
garments they are generally such that are 
worthy of attention. Wherever and whenever 
big sacrifices are made by Eastern manufac- 
turers our buyers are on the ground. We are 
first because we have permanent purchasing 
offices in the East. You can be first to ' '" 
advantage of the 

Unusually Big Values 
Quoted Below 

W f 1 LADIES' SUITS, comprising 
i^Ol X Shepherd Plaids and Club 
Checks, Bedford Cords ^ ^ ^^ qij 
and Novelties; sold reg- v^ ■ ^^•5^0 
ularly as high as $27.70— our 
May sale price 

Consists of highly tailored suits in the most 
.L/vrt' A^ popular weaves and tai- ^ ^ ^^ Ckfl 
loring effects. These suits sold regularly^ ■ m l.J/O 
at $27.50, $29.50, $34.50 and $39.50— our 
May sale price 

In addition to the shepherd plaid, novelty and club 
check we are showing beauties in stripe Bedford cord, 
black and white, blue and black and brown and black. 




hoi 2 



15 



19 




A- 



Summer 
newest 



May Sale Specials in Ladies^ Coats 

Two May Sale Specials— Made up of Tan Matelasse ; sizes 16 and C^JQ QQ 
36; sold regularly at $27.50, tomorrow these 2 coats sell for *P J- ^•*^*J 

O '^l A ^<..r^«.f tM^Mf A large, varied selection of real popular Ladies' Spring and 

Special Assortment ^^^^f. ^^^^^^ ^^^ tailoring that are bound to please. The 

weav^ the latest effects ; ordinarily th^e garments would be considered good JC | 4 Tg 

values at $20.00— our Special May Sale price •f' -^ ^^» • *^ 

Little Girls' Coats at Greatly Reduced Prices 

1 ^11;.,... fn^f ai- *^nO are now reduced to such an extent that no mother will 

'^X<!.'^'^^^^^^vv^i^''tJ^zz;i::"''"'^^ $2.98 

little Girl's Coat, made up of twill. A good selling value at $o.OO, tomorrow «^^ •^KJ 




Shoes for Men^ Women 
and Children 

with style, quality and workmanship. We 
handle, among other popular makes, the 
EDUCATOR— all sold at popular prices. 




A^JUutt 



Gen. Mnyr. 



DULUTH— SUPERIOR— VIRfilNIA 



Alterations Free! 

We do not charge for alterations, which 
means an additional saving to you of from 
$1.50 to $5.00. We guarantee perfect fit- 
ting garments or refund your money. 




No More 
Constipation 

it's Me For Olive TableisI 

That is the joyful cry of thousands 
Blnce Dr. Edwards produced Olive Tab- 
Ifcts, the substitute for calomel. 

Dr. Edwards, a practicing physician 
for 17 years and Calomel's old-time 
enemy, discovered the formula for 
Olive Tablets while treating: patients 
for chronic constipation and torpid 
livers. 

Dr. Edwards' Olive Tablets do not 
contain calomel, but a healing, sooth- 
ing laxative. 

No griping is the "keynote" of these 
little sugar-coated tablets. 

They cause the bowels and liver to 
act normaL They never force them to 
unnatural action. 

Dr. Edwards' Olive Tablets are so 
easy to take that children do not re- 
gard them as "medicine" at all. 

If you have a "dark brown mouth" 
oow and then — a bad breath — a dull, 
tired feeling — sick headache — torpid 
liver and constipated, you'll find quick, 
Bure and only pleasant results from 
one or two little Olive Tablets at bed- 
time. They're perfectly harmless. 

Thousands take one every night just 
to fceep right. Try them. 

"Every little Olive Tablet has a move- 
ment all its own." 10c and 25c per box. 

The Olive Tablet Co., Columbus. Ohio. 



mankind, never considers the welfare 
of its women employes. 

The wage inquiry covered a wide 
field Employes In box and candy fac- 
tories and in department stores were 
called on to testify. 

After hearing the testimony of Mr 
Sloan as to the Indifference of this 
City club to its women employes, sen- 
ator Wilson asked: ,, ^ ^^ 

"Don't you think it would be well 
for your club to invite some one to 
aJdress^it on the subject of women s 

^' "T*ifat subject never has been 
broached to the board of managers. 

"^•^I 'TuiSllr senator Wilson said,, 
"that you broach the suTiject to them. 
Girl* Tell of WaRes. 

A pirl 16 years old, who works at 
th.' Kres'ge five-and-ten-cent store, tes- 
tified thit she pays $1.20 a week car 
fare Her wages is ?5. She said that 
the sales girls employed at the store 
receive from $4 to $6 a week. 

Another woman who works at the 
«tnre for $6 a week said she is mar- 
ried and lives in East St. Louis with 
her h^isband and three children. She 
pays $8 a month rent for a three-roon^ 
house She said that board in the 
average working girls' home costs $3 
a week, and that a working girls 
clothing costs $1 a week. ^ „ ^ 

A young girl who works ft Schaper 
Bros department store testified that 
out of her salary of $4.50 a week the 
store took 25 cents a week for medical 
aid. Another girl testified that she 
started to work at Schaper Bros^ for 
$3.50 and now receives $o.50. There 
are stools In the dtor-- she said, but 
the girls are not allowed to sit on 
them. ^ 

RUSH FOR LICENSES 

AT CLERK'S OFFICE. 

The city clerk's office did a bargain- 
counter business in misoellaneous li- 
censes yesterday. Pawnbrokers, sec- 
ond-hand dealers and keepers of pool 



and billiard halls made haste to take 
out the documents which entitle them 
to do business. The mandate of Com- 
missioner Hicken that they would be 
closed up if they did not comply with 
the provisions of the ordinance had an 
immediate effect and as a result the 
clerk's office collected about $1,000 In 
license fees. 



ENTERTAINMENT AND 




Conrt Dii I-uth Xo. 724, Independent 

Order of F«»r»'Mtcrs, Foresters' hnti, 

curuer Koiirtli Aie. west & First St. 

FRIDAY EVENING. MAY 23rd 

Fr** to F"oresters and friends. 



HOBSON QUITS 

SOU THERN SOCIETY. 

Washington, May 23. — Representative 
Richmond P. Hobson of Alabama, 
"hero of the Merrimac," last night 
resigned as president of the Southern 
Society of Washington because the or- 
ganization declined to adopt an amend- 
ment to the constitution admitting to 
membership persons from all parts of 
the country. Mr. Hobson contended the 
proposed amendment would wipe out 
sectionalism. His resignation was ac- 
cepted and Claude N. Bennett, chair- 
man of the executive committee of the 



Hood's 



Best family physic. 
Do not gripe or cause 
pain. Purely vegeta- 
ble, easy to take. 25c. 



Pills 



society, was electei to succeed Mn 
Hobson. The latter s term of of nee 
would not have expired until Decem- 
ber. 

ASKS UNCTe; SAM TO 
COLLECT ON BONDS 

Kansas Man Raises Ques- 
tion About Missouri 
Pacific Affairs. 

Washington. May 23.— Representative 
Neeley of Kansas has submitted to At- 
torney General Mc Reynolds a formal 
request that the government at once 
oroceed to collect from the Missouri 
Pacific railroad $43,362,346 due the gov- 
ernment for subsidized bonds advanced 
to aid in the const -uction of the Cen- 
tral branch of Uie Missouri Pacific rail- 
road in Kansas. Mr. Neeley recently 
Introduced a resol ition directing the 
attorney general ts take this step. 

This is the only claim the govern- 
ment now has on account of the sub- 
sidy bonds Issued to aid In tlie con- 
struction of the Pacific railroads. All 
other bond-aided railroads have paid 
their subsidy loans^^ 

MORE AMESirslN 

VICE CRUSADE. 

T.09 Angeles, Cal.. May 23.— Two more 
men have been taken into custody in 
connection with the municipal ^pvern- 
mont's antl-vlce campaign. William 
Mdrldge. a Venice prize fight pro- 
moter, and Richar<l Garrlck. a motion 
picture actor, werti -charged with hav- 
ing contributed to the delinquency of 
minor young women. Aldridge was re- 
leased on B Jj.oon bond, James J. Jef- 



fries former champion hea\r>'weight 
pugilist, appeared as one of hia sure- 



ties. 



FIRE UNDERWRITERS 
PLAN CAMPAIGN 

Will Seek to Educate People 

on Insurance Lines— 

Kremer President. 

New York, May 23.— Reports of com- 
mittees covering practically every de- 
partment of the fire Insurance business 
were read yesterday at the Forty-sev- 
enth anual meeting of the National 
Board of Fire Underwriters. President 
(Jeorge Babb in his report said that 
in the last year in forty-one state leg- 
islatures, about 1.500 measures govern- 
ing the fire insurance business were 
introduced and that "unfortunately 
some of them were enacted into law. 
He thought the best corrective plan 
for hostile legislation rested In edu- 
cation concerning fire Insurance, and 
suggested that monographs covering 
the BUbJeot be prepared for Immediate 
distribution to the public. „.„^„ 

Mention of the campaign to stamp 
out incendiarism was made [n^^he com- 
mittee report on arson /Jui-ifff ^he 
last year, the rep ort^^ated^ J4 j^ 

CASTOR I A 

For Infents and Children. 

Tha Kind Yon Have Always Bought 

Bears the 
Signature of 




wards aggregating $41.2aO were offered 
by the underwriters. In the forty 
years since the arson fund was estab- 
lished, the committee reported that 
397 convictions have resulted at a cost 
to the underwriters of $84,869. 

W. K. Kremer of New York was 
elected president. 



WANTED 

First-class male Mlenographer. On© 
capable of doing abntrnct work. Ap- 
ply Hnutsun Friilt Co., 218 and 220 
West Michigan street. 




m^ 



ORGANIZE TO 

FIGHT CANCER. 

New York, May 23. — Permanent or- 
ganization of American physicians and 
laymen engaged in a world-wide ftght 
against cancer, was effected at a 
gathering yesterday which i-eprcsented 
most of the medical bodies identified 
with the Congress of American Physi- 
cians and Surgeons. A campaign of 
education against Uie disease will be 
undertaken through magazines, traJn- 
Inff schools, women's clubs and in other 
ways, according to the plans an- 
nounced. Special attention will be 
given to teaching women the early 
symptoms of cancer. 

ANOTHE R RAT E CASE. 

Louisiana-Texas Question Before the 
Supreme Court. 

Washington. May 23.— The Shreve- 
port rate case, in which the commerce 
court recently upheld the order of the 



Interstate .commerce commission re- 
quiring railroads either to reduce their 
interstate rates on shipments from 
Shreveport, La., to Texas cities, or to 
increase their rates on similar goods 
between Texas points, was yesterday 
taken to the supreme court of the 
United States en appeal. 

The Texas railroad commission ha.d 
directed a reduction of the Texas rate 
to build up "home industry." The case 
involves a conflict between state and 
interstate commerce commissions that 
has attracted attention throughout tlie 

country. 

« 

Japanese Buy Steamers. 

London, May "23. — Several British 
steamships ranging from 3,000 to 5,000 
tonnage have been sold to Japan buy- 
ers in the last few days. These include 
the Narrung, Benacre, Bentala and 
Vadala. 

. « 

Special IlllnolA Session. 

Springfield, 111.. May 23.— Speaker 
McKinley expects Governor Dunne to 
call a special session of the general 
assembly in the fall, probably In the 
month of October. The speaker said 
he would deliver a speech later in the 
year. ^^^_^___^^______— __ 



Rheu 

matism 

Cured 






Medical Adrice 
on RkeumatUm" 

cilled the moM iiractlcal work on 
rheumatism ever published. ExpUlO* 

«088 i Si](tr-ei«hty.«igh« whic h h««^ 
cured thousands —con- 
t -(ins no d ingcrous dru^s. 

1/ M dot* ni>t cur*u^u^]f^U' 

guarmttt »n\ It'f yttj uMont I 

• txxtl. l9 r*tnm*d. Ko«|ndfi>rl 

this Ftm Book vltb dlrMtiwa fcrl 

•utBf th» p4lB and r*m<iTt»( tb»\ 

0>uM— vitt* at ontt! AddrtM 

■ AIT J. JOH!nK>S CO., 
DrpU F< Bt. F>nl, SIbb.] 
|||llll|j 



Illl||| 
||il>.| 



'lUiiiiiill Ihluuillilllllliiiulll 





\ 



,:t 






i 



\ 



BOB 



Friday, 



JHE DULUTH HERALD 



May 23, 1913. 



y^v ^^vv^^v^^'^^* 






\ 




mmn 




nyi^iu 



You will travel a long time before you will see so 
much intrinsic worth in tailoring as is found in this 
store. The man who comes to the 

Fit WELL Store 

for his clothes gets bigger and better values. lie 
sees here the dominant style and the newest fab- 
rics. The weaves, the workmanship and the fit 
are expressive of high-priced tailoring. We are empha- 
sizing: it stronolv with something remarkable in suits at 



$ 



15 




$ 



25 



We are showing some distinctly new suit models — 
\\'orsteds, Blue Serges and Cassimeres in handsome 
new color effects. See them on display in our center 
show^ case at — 



See Center 

Show Case 

Display 




See Center 

Show Case 

Display 



All clothes purchased of us we guarantee to keep in 
repair and pressed free of charge. 



QUALITY 



^m 



CLOTHES 



ci^THIMG COMPAH^ 



1 1 2 W. Superior St., Duluth, Minn. 




INSULT FOR THE LARGE 
BUT BON YDIP LODOCUS. 

Pittsburg. Pa.. May 23.— The mys- 
tery of Carntgie Institute Is, "Who 
tied the pink rosette on the tail of the 
dlplodocus?'* 

What If der kaiser und der kings 
und princes knew of a pink rosette 
being pinned on the tail of the diplo- 
docus that is the model of the diplo- 
doci? The idea of a pink rosette on 
the 50-foot tail of the great creature 
that roamed the Western wilds 1,000,- 



000 years ago — a p-i-n-k r-o-s-e-t-t-e! 

Every moment some guard in the 
museum twists lils head around sud- 
dtnly and looks suspiciously at the 
tall of the dlplodocus. In his fancy he 
sees the same pink rosette that caused 
all the trouble. 

It was some days ago. There were 
few people in the museum of the in- 
stitute. The guard strolled afield. A 
party of young women went through. 
They whispered and giggled of wagers. 

They looked down and looked back, 
and no one was in sight. Then one 
young creature slid a large pink ro- 
sette from beneath her motor coat. In 
a jlffv she tlfd it on the tail of the 



big dlplodocus. Then they all slipped 
away, their liearts beating fast. 

« 

HOME-GROWN S.\LADS. 
Harper's Bazaar: Make window 
boxes for the back windows and in 
them sow thyme, parsley, radish, let- 
tuce, carrot and cucumber seed. Also 
set out several dozen onion sets. Four 
such window boxes kept, a family of 
three in crisp salads and fresh green 
vegetables throughout the summer, be- 
ing replanted about every three weeks. 
This meant a saving of many dollars. 



PASSING HF 
BOWERy TYPE 

IM I I ■ I'm 

"Chuck'' Connors Was Epi- 
tome of Life jn the 
Tough Days. 



Wielded Much Influence 

Among Denizens of Lower 

East Side. 




New York, May 23. — When the life 
of George Wanhlngton Connors — 
"Chuck" Connors, as every one knew 
him — flickered ou : a few days ago at 
the Hudson street' hospital In New 
York, there passed the last of the old 
Bowery types. 

"Chuck" was of the Bowery breed of 
a generation ago. Unlettered, unread, 
his mouth filled v.'lth picturesque lan- 
guage of the terrible tough type, he 
would be as strangely out of place 
among the modern bad men of the 
lyower East side as a cable car on 
Broadway. 

Compared to the gunman of today, 
"Chuck" spoke ill a strange tongue. 
He would have been uncomfortable 
among a crowd o): gangsters speaking 
pretty fair Italian as readily as a good 
brand of public iithool English. His 
ready fists would have been as use- 
less as a policeman's siieated club if 
brought into action against tlie gun- 
man's automatic revolver. "Chuck" 
would have been like a duck out of 
water had he sought his associates in 
pool halls instead of the barrooms and 
chop suey Joints of Chinatown. There, 
at least, he was more at home even in 
the native Chinese lingo than the ave- 
rage Italian-American gangster would 
be among his non-English speaking 
neighbors just over from Italy or 
Sicily. 

As a Pilot for Sit(htHeers. 

Some say "Chuck" was til when he 
died, but others believe the Bowery 
life used him up more yuickly than 
that and he may uot even have been 
50 in fact. But "Cliuck's" life was 
measured by exix^rtence and not in 
years. Of late he had picked up a fair 
living piloting pal"ties of sightseers 
and rubbernecks through Mott and 
I'eli streets and the labyrinths of the 
Chinese quarter. He even turned to 
the stage for a living a few years 
ago and through so doing met one of 
the disappointments of his life. Known 
as the "Mayor of Cliinatown," he was 
visited by a theatrical agent, who 
was arranging to star him in a play 
of Bowery life. Hear "Chuck's'' de- 
scription of how he found the play 
was not to be "1'he Mayor of China- 
town," but only "The Bowery After 
Dark." Said "Chuck:" 

'Say. dis is de woist case of rubbin' 
It into a guy I ever heard of. 

"If I didn't have me bundle — me rag 
— Liz wid me — an' all ready to be an 
acterine. Id blow de job. I would. 

"A guy come to me at Flynn's and 
sez: 'Here, "Chuck," I wants' a guy 
what can act' Well, what could a guy 
loik me do? Wid Liz lookin' on, too? — 
I threw out me ciest an' seen ,dat me 
rag was watchin' me. 

" 'Say,' sez I, 'w hat's to be de name 
Of this piece?' 

" 'The Bowery After It Gets Black,' 
sez he. ("The BoA'ery After Dark.") 

"'Nix,' sez I, 'not for mine. It's 
older "'Chuck' Connors, Mayor of 
Chinatown," or I quit." " 

They promised "Chuck" they would 
change the name for him, but they 
never did and "<:huck." needing the 
money, went with the show anyway. 
Better For Her Influence. 

There was at least one uplifting in- 
fluence in the life of "Chuck" Connors. 
This was wielded by his wife, who 
died in 1905. As Nellie Noonp,n she 
was just a comely girl graduate of the 
Jackson public school when she met 
"Chuck" Connors at a Bowery ball. Her 
brilliance was as an arc light to an 
incandescent compared to "Chuck's" 
slow moving mortality, but she was 
dazzled by his dash; and a good priest, 
finding no impediment, married them. 
For nine years tiey were happy to- 
gether and "Chufk," a rover though 
he was, was true to his Nell. Their 
home was apart from the Bowery 
where "Chuck's" fame and livelihood 
lay, for he saw to it that his wifo 
should not become a part of the life 
he knew. 

Nell taught "Chuck" to read and 
write and to leive out the swear 
words In a simple sentence when try- 
ing to express his thoughts. She 
might also have taught "Chuck" to 
pray had she lived. But Nell fell ill 
and died and the Bowery helped to pay 
her funeral expenses. And as he stood 
by while the clods rattled down upon 
her coffin in the open grave "Chuck" 
said to a companion: 

"She was a stuff to tic up wid me. 
And without her I would have been a 
stuffed mut." This was as close as 
"Chuck" ever cair.e to a prayer. 

A negro woman who had known 
"Chuck" all his life, and a Chinaman 
the Bowerv called ''^ocks," were with 
him when he fell ill of heart disease 
down In Doyer street. "Rocks ran 
for a policeman and they came and 
took "Chuck" to the hospital. He was 
unconscious when tll^y nicked him up, 
^Q It may be said that'^'Chuck" lived 
'%nd died in the Bowery, and that he 
fell there with his boots on. 

A Friend ol Literary Men. 

"Chuck" was the friend of authors. 
Hall Calne he once piloted through the 
Bowerv at night, and the author of 
"The Christian" B:Ud of him: 

" 'Chuck' Connor's personality haunt- 
ed me, and again ifter that first visit I 
returned to Chinitown to renew my 
acquaintance with one of the most 
original characters It has ever been rny 
fortune to meet. We have nothing in 
England, not even thp costermonger, to 
equal the type. Chuck' Connors will 
always remain one of my most pleas- 
ant recollections of America" 

Stephen Crane, author of 'The Red 
Badge of Courage" and other stories, 
also visited "Chvck" to obtain those 
touches of slum life that made his 
work so entertaining. "Chuck Con- 
nors was the Unit between the Bow- 
ery of old and the changing conditions 
of today. 

Eighty per cent of the working girls 
of New York take home their sealed 
pay envelopes to "heir parents. 



To Stop Dandruff 

This Home Made Mixinrc Stops Dan- 
druff and Falling Hair and 
Aids Is Growth. 

To a half pint oi water add: 

Bay Rum 1 oz. 

Barbo Compound a small box 

Glycerine • % oz- 

These are all simple Ingredlente 
that you can buy from any druggist at 
very little cost, and mix them your- 
self. Apply to the scalp once a day 
for two weeks, then once every other 
week until all the mixture Is used. A 
half pint should be enough to rid the 
head of dandruff and kill the dandruft 
germs. It stops the hair from fall- 
ing out, relieves inching and scalp dis- 
eases. 

Although it Is not a dye, it act.s 
upon the hair roots and will darken 
streaked, faded, gray hair in ten or 
fifteen days. It promotes the growth 
of the hair and n-akes harsh hair soft 
and glossy. 



LOOKS GOOD 
TO PROPHETS 

Another Year of Magnifi- 
cent General Trade Is 
Indicated. 



Very Few Mills, Shops and 

Factories Up With 

Orders. 



of 
sn 

es 
id 



Berlin Court Fines Man Who 

Talked to Them 

Roughly. 

Berlin, May 23.— The woes of tele- 
phone subscribers all over the world 
appear to be much the same, and to 
lead to a strong desire to say unkind 
things to the telephone girls. The In- 
clination should be suppressed In Ger- 
many, for It is expensive. Our laws 
regarding Insult work out occasionally 
in wavs that appear ridiculous but 
they have their uses, and one of them 
is the protection of hello girls from 
the Irate telephone subscriber who 
gets abusive when he is kept waiting 
longer than he considers proper, or 
who is convinced tiiat the girl is too 
lazy to give him the connection de- 
sired when she tells him the line is 

busy. J, „ . i 

A Berlin attorney named Paechter 
has Just had this borne in on him for- 
cibly In an action brought against him 
for insulting two telephone girls and 
the postal authorities In general. 
Paechter, an excitable man, had for- 
merly had considerable trouble with 
the postal authorities over the tele- 
phone and it had been taken away 
once because he abused the exchange 
employes. On his promise to be g^ood 
the telephone was restored to him. A 
few days later a number of Indignant 
voung women complained of Paechter's 
language to them, and the director of 
posts had the attorney's connection 
takeu out. "The post has a sense of 



That "SALADA" Flavour 

The fine flavour and downright goodness of 




Tea will please you. Buy a package today from 
your grocer — you'll like it. 



New Yoik, May 23. — To sum up the 
business of this week and the changes ' 
indicated for the future is not a diffi- 
cult task, for It has been a very un- 
eventful one in industrial, financial 
and commercial affairs. 

Tliere has been little or no change 
in the manufacturing districts, every- 
thing running in fairly good capacity, 
especially in the iron, steel and oilier 
metal classes. 

New orders are not being placed for 
large amounts, but it is not the season 
to expect large orders, so no disap- 
pointment is felt as to that. 

It is well and correctly described as 
an active season, with hopes of in- 
creased activity. 

It must not bo overlooked in con- 
sidering future business that in the 
great majority of instances the mer- 
chants' stocks are not in as great 
yuantities as usually at tiiis lime of 
the year. 

Very few mills, shops and factories 
are up with their orders and between 
consumer and producer, in many ar- 
ticles, tliere are little or no supplies. 
SerlouN Slturtase I'oti.sible. 

This is true in dry goods in gro- 
ceries, in iron, steel, copper, brass and 
tin products, in lumber and oilier con- 
struction materials, and in case c 
heavy harvests of crops and a sudde 
activity in transportation aflairs de 
veloped by assured great tonnage 
from the farms and plantations, an^ 
aided by the demand from the agricul 
turists upon the light stocks of the 
mercliants there will surely come a 
serious shortage in many articles. 

While It is a fact that our manufac- 
tures and our imports have been run- 
ning at a maximum for the past year, 
it Is also a fact that the purchasing 
by the ultimate consumers has also 
i.»een at a maximum, so tliat in very 
few cases have supplies shown any 
tendency to accumulate. 

Tills can be set down as a decidedly 
healthy condition for trade, one that 
there is no fina'^jial danger In, but 
one that with favorable returns from 
the crops will result in at least a year 
of magnificent business. 

The tendency shown by the secre- 
tary of tue treasury to adopt a policy 
that will keep the volume of the cur- 
rency up to the demands of current 
business is favorably commented upon 
by the manufacturers and the mer- 
chants, while the reports going about 
as to the outlines of the new currency 
legislation all seem to indicate that 
greater facilities for providing cur- 
rency to the business men will be es- 
tablished before the adjournment of 
the extra session of the congress. 
Good lleports From Abroad. 

Private advices from European money 
centers are very encouraging for easier 
money abroad, while the statement of 
the Bank of England, showing more 
than 50 per cent reserve as compared 
with liabilities, is thought to fore- 
shadow another reduction in the bank 
rate of discount by June 1. 

The rectnt interview of James J. 
mil was quite optimistic, and his de- 
claration that there were no clouds in 
the business atmosphere of the United 
States was read with great interest 
by the many business men here who 
regard Mr. Hill as a practical business 
man, an able transportation manager 
and a sound financier. 

Mr Hill gave so many examples of 
good present and prospective business, 
he was so v^ry practical in his state- 
ment as to the powerful factors for 
prosperity that were in operation in the 
United States at this time, he was so 
clear in his summing up and logical 
throughout that unless one could deny 
his citation of facts there was no es- 
cape from acceptance of his con- 
clusions. It Is seldom that Mr. Hill 
R-Ives an Interview of such length and 
such detail, and It has had a powerful 
effect upon the active business people 
throughout the country. 

The Canadian Pacific Railway com- 
pany announces that It has just placed 
orders for construction of two new 
steamships for Its Atlantic serv ce, 
sister ships of the two now nearing 
completion, which are to be operated 
upon the Pacific. Those latest or- 
dered are to be ready In June and July, 
1<)14 They will be built upon the 
Clvde, and each of them will have ac- 
cornmodallons for 530 seccnd-class and 
1,230 third-class passengers. 

Rxpanntou of Ocean Commerce. 

Here we have another example of the 
rapid and vast expansion of ocean 
commerce. These four v'cssels are of 
12.000 tons each, are 520 feet In length, 
with freight carrying capacity as well 
as providing accommodations for 
ncarlv 1.800 passengers. 

The millions of dollars in capital 
KOlng into these large and commodious 
vessels are being Invested where as- 
sured of large returns, and shlpoing 
men all t&lk as if the building of 
such great ocean carriers has scarcely 
commenced. ,, . , 

Thev one and all predict a marvelous 
Increase in the number of great steam- 
shios plying the oceans 

The news from the wheat and cotton 
belts are now scanned each day very 
clos-'lv by manufacturers, merchants 
and the transportatton men for In the 
agricultural results are vital results 

to them. ^ ^ M, I, 

Bv June 20 the wheat returns will be 
.<50 clopely estimated that if the present 
favorable outlook is confirmed, many 
railwav orders for new cars may be 
the bcRlnnlng of a remarkable spurt 
in trade. _ 

REVENGElBTA^NED 
FOR HELLO GIRLS 



CHICKERING PIANOS 

Here is a thought that should be uppermost in every 
piano purchaser's mind: "Why should I pay the 
price of a good piano and not get a good piano." 
\N'hy should I buy unkno\\^^ and untried piano quality 
when fur the same money — likely — I can secure the 
^vorld-famo»:s 



5.^^^^^ 



-6^mit^x 




^^ ^ PIANO Cv 



And yet, we know that this is being repeated every 
day. Just yesterday a lady said: "I am sorry I did 
not call at vour store before I purchased. I so much 
wanted a CHICKERING, and to think that I allowed 
myself to be talked into another piano at what you 
ask for a CHICKERING makes me regret my hasty 
action." Come tu our store and see the magnificent 
display of CHICKERING Grands and Uprights — all 
priced very low and on easy terms. 

HOWARD, FARWELL & CO. 

SOLE AGENTS. 
Oldest Reliable Piano Merchants. 

120 EAST SUPERIOR STREET 

WILBUR J. ALLEN, Manager. 



justice like a Hottentot's," said the 
irate Paechter, thereby adding anoth- 
er count to the charges against him. 

At the trial the girls from tiic ex- 
change testified that they had been 
saluted with phrases like these: 

"Get off the line, you camel!" 

•'Any sooner, you calf!" 

"Pay attention to me, common fe- 
male person (gemeines frauenzim- 
mer)!" 

Paechter admitted some of the epi- 
thets charged, but offered to justify 
them by proving facts tending to ex- 
cuse his irritation. He would prove, he 
said, that one of the chief delights of 
the girls at the Luetzow exchange (his 
exchange) was to connect any person 
demanding a subscriber named Cohn 
with all tne Cohns of the exchange and 
then to enjoy the despairing efforts of 
the bewildered subscribers to find out 
which of them was wanted. The task 
was considerable. Inasmuch as there 
are seventy-five Cohns connected with 
this exchange. Paechter offered also 
to prove that lines were free when 
they had been reported engaged, that 
he had been kept deliberately because 
the girls did not like him. and other 
shortcomings at the exchange. 

The court refused to admit the tes- 
timony holding that It was Imma- 
terial, "since no conduct by the ex- 
change employes could justify the 
epithets applied to them. An alienist, 
however, was permitted to testify that 
Paechter Is a very excitable man, and 
that the telephone is a dangerous ir- 
ritant to many persons. The witness 
even declared that a physician whom 
he knew had become mentally de- 
ranged solely through anger at poor 
telenhone service. 

The attorney vrs.s fined 2G0 marks, 
and costs, amounting to about as much 
more. To this punishment must be 
added his loss during seven months in 
which all connection was denied him. 

COMPLAINS OF TANGO 
AND TH E TURK EY TROT. 

Colorado Springs, Colo., May 23. — 
The tango and turkey trot will not be 
tolerated in the public dance halls 
here and the curfew law will be 
strictly enforced, if the recommenda- 
tions of the grand jury are followed. 

"The jury recommended that public 
dance halls be placed under the super- 
vision of the commissioner of public 
safety and managers of these places 
be removed without notice "for mis- 
conduct or the encouragement of mis- 
conduct among those in attendance." 

It suggests that a woman police of- 
ficer look after young girls and room- 
ing houses of the city, and that 



watchmen prevent spooning in tha 
public parks and playgrounds at night. 

smithTamely 

association 



Those of Colonial Stock to 

Be Enrolled in 

Society. 

Boston, Mass., May 23. — The task of 
organizing a Smith family association 
seems at first glance to be an appalllngr 
one. If every one by the name of 
Smith, or if half, one-third or one- 
tenth of the Smiths in Boston and vi- 
cinity were to join for social and fra- 
ternal purposes the meetings would 
have to be held on the Common. 

But the Smith association, of which 
Dr. R. Kendrick Smith is president, 
Charles T. Smith, secretary, and Arthur 
W. Smith, historian, has no such pur- 
pose in mind. It wants all the Smiths 
who come of colonial stock to under- 
stand that they can, by enrolling in th« 
Smith association, honor their ances- 
tors who took such a conspicuous part 
In the founding of this republic. 

Prominent In the work of securing 
members for the organization Is George 
A. Smith, secretary of the American 
Society of Colonial Families. Mr. Smith 
has made a close study of genealogy 
and Is generally regarded as an au- 
thority. He is a vice president of th« 
Smith association and as a descendant 
of one of the colonial Smiths, he ia 
eager to see as many of the family 
united as possible. 

"There Is an unseen bond," said Mr, 
Smith in discussing the subject, "that 
grips two men when they learn that 
they come of the same immigrant an- 
anc'estor, although many years back. 
The Smith association may appear to 
have a tremendous problem on lt« 
hands, but not to those who are fa- 
miliar with what we are undertaking. 

"One of the obstacles that confronts 
us and which causes many people to 
hesitate about joining is the threadbare 
humor that the name of Smith always 
suggests. We don't mind these jokes; 
in fact, I can laugh as heartily as any- 
body at a joke on the Smiths, but there 
are some people who are sensitive. 
When vou come to look up this or that 
person" by the name of Smith, you will 
find that there are no more colonial 
Smiths than of any other family, so 
that the number of colonial Smiths av- 
erages no greater than that of other 
families of more or less common sur- 
name. 



Duffy's Pure Malt Whiskey 

For over half a century has streng-thened the Bged 
and brought health and happiness to young and old. 




Best Family Medicine. 

"We always keep Duffy's Pure 
Malt Whiskey in our home, be- 
cause of the great good it has 
done my husband, chi Id and self . 
When we first heard of it we were all 
run down with hard work. My husband 
had used it only one week when I 
noticed a decided improvement, which 
continued. I also used it when I had 
change of life, and obtained wonderful 
results."— Mrs. M. Drolet, 2609 Cald- 
well St, Omaha, Neb. 



Strength to Resist Wintry 
BlasU. 

"Duffy's Pure MaltWhiskey 
has done me a world of good. I 
am past 60, yet have superin- 
tended my men all Summer in the boil- 
ing hot sun, and ntn-er lost a day. I am 
sure I could not have done so had it 
not been for the strength Duffy's 
gave me. I never lost a day the past 
two Winters that a man could possibly 
work in the open."— Harry R. King, 
Brunswick, Md. 



Sealed bottles only by most dnis'trlsta, proeers, dealers: |1 .00 a 
bottle. The Duffy Malt Whiskey Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Health, Strengrth and Vigor 



/ 



) 




) 



8 



TWO MEAT 
INSPECTORS 

Schneider Refuses to Quit 

When Bernhart Goes 

to Work. 



City's Civil Service Regula- 
tions Will Be Given 
Test. 




Who la the city meat inspector? 

Is It Inapector Schneider, the hold- 
over from the former administration. 
or l9 It Inspector Leo Bernhart. ap- 
pointed by Dr. Webster. 

Both are working. Schneider Is fol- 
lowing the usual routine and 30 Is 
Bernhart. Each asserts that he la the 
city meat Inspeitor. 

Schneider claims that under the civil 
service regulations he can only be re- 
moved for cause and that he has not 
been so removed. Bernhart is worK- 
Ing bv virtue of his appointment by 
Dr. W.-bster. , . , 

Schneider wa*i asked to turn in his 
star and cred^'iitiala yesterday. He 
didn't He stated that he had been 
asked to resign but thus far that he 
has not resigned. He has laid lu-s 
case before an attorney, who will take 
It up with the new civil service 

board. . ..1. J .. 

"Schn>'lder may lose ot»t In the end. 
said a city employe this morning, but 
his fif?ht will help us all out. so that 
It win not be in vain In any event. 
no matter what the result. It will show 
whether civil service In Duluth Is only 
an empty form or really amounts to 
something." 



CITY BRIEFS 



M. 1. Ste»»«rt « onipany. 

Successors to 1 i.win^-Stevvart Co.. 
Printers. Designers. Lithographers. 

. . — ^ ■ 

Will Brlnic Their Sons. 
Sons of members of the Commercial 
club will be gu-.-sts of the public af- 
fairs committee at its regular meetint; 
at the club this evening. Dinner will 
be served at 6:15 and the business of 
the me. ting will follow. After th.- 
r^-gular business of the committee. F. 
E House, a. C. Hartley and C. P. Craig 
will give talks to the boys. 

Gnard Yournelf. 

Hot weather breeds germs in raw 
irllk Re sure you use pasteurized 
n:ilk. which Is entirely free from 
germs. 'Phone us for our wagon to 
call. Rridgeman-Russell company, 16 
"West First street. 



ago from Vlr.glnla. where he had been 
In the employ of the Oliver Iron Min- 
ing company. 

• 

Siie>« for Salary 

A jurv was drawn in district court 
before Judffe Cant this morning to try 
the lawsuit which George A. McDmi- 
ald has brought against the Stone-Or- 
dean-Wells company in which he seeks 
to collect $3.0S3. which he claims is 
due him from the company on n con- 
tract for services. McDonald alleges 
that the company contracted for his 
.services for the year of li»l2 at the rate 
of $300 per month. He claims that the 
company discharged him In March 
without good reas on. 

LuokluK for Job*. 

Courtenay Dinwiddle, secretary of 
the Associated Charities, would like 
to place three men who have applied 
to his office for relief, with jobs. One. 
he says, is a highly competent book- 
keeper, who lost both feet in an acci- 
dent a short time ago. The other two. 
he declares, are anxious to do farm 
work. All are In hard straits and 
worthy of assistance. 

Held to Grand Jury. 

William Pflager, Peter C.rey and 
Charles K. O'Nell. the three sailors 
arrested yesterday morning on a 
eharge of having robbed Andy Mc- 
intosh of $S to $12 In the Nicollet 
hotel, waived examination when ar- 
raigned In police court yesterday aft- 
ernoon. They were bound over to 
await the action of the next grand 
jurv. Mcintosh claims that the trio 
jerked him into a room as he was 
passing along the corridor, threw him 
down and went through his pockets. 

Barber and Bootblack FIgM. 

Hector McCray. a barber, and •pi'\^<;3 
Palos, a bootblack, were arrested this 
morning on charges of disorderly con- 
duct when they engaged In a nght in 
the barber shop near First avenue 
east and Superior street, where both 
are employed. McCray Is said to have 
taken the bootblack to task for abus- 
ing his (Pal03'> smaller brother. In 
the ensuing scuffle they broke one of 
the front windows, the bootblack sus- 
taining a slight cut on the head. Both 
entered pleas of not guilty when ar- 
raigned In police court this morning 
and their trials was set for this aft- 
ernoon. They were released on |10 

ball. each. 

» 

On Trial For Robbery. 

Albert Garblch. charged with rob- 
bery In the flr.st degree, was brought to 
trial before Judge Dancer and a jury in 
district court this afternoon. He was 
jointly Indicted with Joe Kuto by the 
Mav grand jury on a charge of having 
held up Albert Gross at the foot of the 
stair leading from the Lake a-venue 
viaduct to St. Croix avenue on May 8 
la.st It is claimed that the two men 
secured about $10. Garblch ami Kuto 
demanded separate trials. N. H. v\ 11- 
son is appearing as their attorney. 



One 20<' Tootli linisli 
One 26c tube VVilUam's 

D<Mitiii Crtviiu 

One nlc-kei |>lated Tootlil 
Biii.sh Holder ) 

No need to tell you what a value 
this is. We make tt for on© day only 
simply to introduce Wllliam'3 Dental 
Cream to now customers — believing 
that once tried it will be frequently 
demanded. 



SEND YOUR MAIL ORDERS TO 



PERSONAL 



Coat est Caam. 

Th.« contests of W. E. McEwen, B. 
Sjlberstein and Marcus Ll B'ay against 
Mayor W. I. Prince and that of Bert 
Farrell against Commissioners Hlcken 
and Murchison are on the calendar for 
trial at the special term of district 
court tomorrow. Whether the Farrell 
case will be reached is a question, and 
the argument.s In the mayoralty contest 
cannot be completed in one day. The 
adj>urntnont of the court will prob- 
ably be taken to some day next week. 
as the attorneys are anxious to have 
the case submitted as soon as possible. 

. ^ 

Memorial .«iorvlc«fl. 

Memorial services will be held at the 
Pilgrim Congregational church. Lake 
avenue and .Second street. Sunday at 
10:30 a m. Special services will also 
be held at the lister Park M. E. 
church at S p. m. of the same day and 
a special invitation is extended to 
members of the Citizens' staff. 



Blue Print Company 

The imluin Blue Print company 
filed articles of Incorporation yester- 
Uiy with the register of deeds. It Is 
organized to engage In the blue print 
business and In the handling of archl- 
toct.s', engineers" and draftsmen's sup- 
plies. Tiie capital stock is $50,000 and 
the Incorporators are: I. F. Pohlman. 
I resident ;M. E. Murray, vice pre^aldent, 
and C. M. Kent, secretary and treas- 
vrer. 



Aid for Schools. 

A check for $K?.oa8.29 has been re- 
telveu by County Auditor Halden from 
Btate Auditor iverson to be appor- 
tioned among the county school dls- 
trlct.s. The money is derived from tne 
Btate land fund 



Jary Dlwagreea. 

After being out for more than twen- 
ty-four hours, the jury in the $11,200 
t'.amage suit, brought by Fred Eggers 
against the National Candy company 
and others for alleged injuries to his 
4 -year-old son. Raymond Eggers, by 
being run over by a delivery wagon 
operated by the candy company, re- 
poited a disagreement late yesterday 
pfternoon and were discharged by 
Judge Cant from further service on 
the case. 



T s Wood will leave this evening 
for' Chicago. Philadelphia and New 
York on legal business. He will re- 
turn by way of Montreal and Quebec^ 

S W. Richardson has returned from a 
week's business trip to Chicago and 

" Tracey Granger of Crookston is reg- 
istered at the .Spalding. 

Harry Witt of Grand Forks is a 
guest of the Spalding. 

S. A. Stohlton of Minneapolis Is at 
the Spalding. . 

G. White of Milwaukee Is at the 
Spalding today. ^ .„ o* 

T. S. Bergen of Stevens Point Is at 
the Spalding. ,. , » ♦1,^ 

J. L. Kelly of Minneapolis Is at the 

Spalding. i.ti„„ 

Mrs B. Tavlor of Roosevelt, Minn.. 

is at the Spalding. 

H. O. Johnson of Virginia Is at the 

St Louis. 

Thomas Wright of Port Arthur Is at 
the St Louis. . . ^ ^. 

John McDonnell of Hlbblng Is at the 
St Louis. , ^ , 

P J. Ryan of Hlbblng Is registered 

at the St. Louis. * *u cf 

Max Klein of Hlbblng Is at the St. 

Louis. . , . J _♦ 

Harry Jokala of Ely is registered at 

the St. Louis. , . ^ A 

J. J. Stuart of Hlbblng Is registered 

at the St. Louis. 

A. J. Heell of White Bear la at the 

Miss Rose MarUn of Fort William Is 
at the McKay. 

Andrew Johnson of Virginia Is at 
the McKay. ^ . ^ ^. 

.«?olomon Sax of Eveleth is at the 
McKay. , , . ^. 

George Meally of Chisholm Is ftt the 

McKay. ^ ^, 

John Dlnon and wife of Cloquet are 

at the McKay. ... * *i. 

George Mullen of Virginia Is at the 

Lenox. . ^ ^ *., , 

Harvey Johnson of International 

p'alls is "at the Lenox. 

S. A. Kemp of Fort Frances Is at the 
Lenox. . . 

Sidney Brackett of Chisholm is regis- 
tered at the Lenox. 

Walter Hollingshead of Minneapolis 
is at the Holland. 

J. A. Meinlng of Chicago Is at the 
Holland. , ^ ^^ 

1. G. Bennett of Chisholm Is at the 
Holland. ,. , 

O. V. Summerfleld of Minneapolis Is 
at the Holland. 




lliam'3 Dental I %/ %/ 



THE STORE FOR SERVICE. 

113-115-11T-119 West Superior Street, Duluth, Mina. 



Dainty "Pyralin" Ivory for 
Gifts for Graduates 

Parisian and I'yralin Ivory promises 
to be the most acceptable of gifts :;t 
the sweet girl graduates. Therefore It 
l8 interesting to note the superb as- 
sortment of dainty desirable articles 
e.specially suited for gifts. Prices 
range from about 35e to $12.00. 

Pieces to be monogrammed should 
be ordered now. 



Window 



$25 



Do not stay away because you do not wish to buy, or because you 
are not ready. Come in and look, see for yourself what wonderful suits 
are selling here at $25. And tell your friends how fine the suits are. 



Stylish, distinctive, original, individual— but 
withal refined and practical with plenty of 
■'snap" — no "freaks." 

We cannot detail here, there are too many 
different styles and in many instances but few 
of a kind, as is the case in the odd ones and twos 
in $30.00 and $32.50 suits which have been in- 
cluded in the $25.00 lot for a quick close out 



$ 



25 



There are Serges, Whipcords, Worsteds, 
Fancy Diagonals, and Novelty Weaves in blacks, 
grays, Dutch blues, tans, browns and hairlina 
stripe effects. 

Three-button cutaway, square corner, or Bal- 
kan models are included. Some of the skirts 
have set in kick jpleats, others suggestions of 
draped effects. All jackets are peau de cygne 
lined. Augmented lots will be ready for tomor- 
row's selling. 



The $1 9.50 Lot of Coats Has Been Reinforced for 

Tomorrow's Selling 

If you had planned on paying $22.50 or $28.50 for a coat— why not see if you can- 
not find the coat you like among those on sale at $19.50 tomorrow. 



New 

Waists 

Latest Models 

in Reed 
Tailor-Mades 



Broken lines of sizes in Sport Coats, Utility 
Coats and Dress Coats that regularly sold 
at $22.50, $25.00 and $28.50 have been_placed 
on sale at $19.50. Of 
course not all of our 
$22.50, $25 and $28.50 
coats are in the lot, but the assortment of- 
fered is very attractive and embraces the few 
remaining garments of some of our best 
selling lines. 



$ 



Come in Tomorrow — 
Loolc Around! 

Find suits and coats for 
every occasion, for every re- 
quirement, for every purse 

— try on some of them here 
— you may choose from gar- 
ments representing the best 
that American tailors can do. 




Teaiplr S«rvle*«. 

R*»5V!lar Sabbaih services will be held 
at Temple Emanuel. Seventh avenue 
east and Second street thi.* evening at 
h o'clock. Rabbi M. Lefkovits will 
jyreach on "Crimes of the Ton.?ue." 
♦ 

Wew nramntlc riiib to Give Danoe. 

Th«^ New l>rnniatic olub. which was 
recently or^anizeil and who now have 
l.'iO members, will give their initial 
dance at the Armory, tomorrow. Satur- 
dav r.lsht. The proceeds are to go to- 
waird.-! purchasing costumes and other 
;, ■ s.s'Hies for the club, who In the 
ir future, will put on a firs^t-cla-ss 
jiiay for the public. Tickets are 75 
I ent.s per couple, extra lady, 25 cents. 
P'laaton's full orchestra will furnish the 
mu.^ic tor the occasion. Everybody is 
•welcome. 



NEW PARCEL POST 

REGULATIONS 



Here Are Auto Hats of Un- 
common Style 

For motoring wear the hat must be practical and should 
be smartly aristocratic, as befitting the wearer's station m 
life, and this combination is happily solved in new shapes 
we have recently placed in stock. 

They are here in silk, in linen effects, 

' and many of them have satin crowns 

of red, emerald green, blue or white. 

Prices range $1.50 to $7.50. 

We believe you will like them — suppose you 

come in and try some of them on tomorrow. 

There Are Also Chic Outing Hats for Women 

and Misses 

Ratines and Turkish Terry are largely used this 
season for fashioning the hats for jolly holidays. 
There are blues, pinks, champagne and white. 

Prices range $1.25 to $3.50. 

^SLL.„. Trimmed Hats Sell at $4.75 Tomorrow 




The New Models in W. B. Elas- 

tine Reduso Embody Common 

Sense With Grace and Beauty 

The dominant styles for the coming summer require the 



appearance of an uncorseted 



First .showing of 
new black 

HATS 

AT 

$6.50 up 



Sayii He Is Bankrupt. 

Charles H. Thornton t>f Duluth. grain 
broker, this morning filed a voluntary 
p«'tition in bankruptcy In the United 
States court. He gives his liabilities as 
I21.5S3.35 and assets at |4,300. 

♦ 

Cntler Funeral. 

The funeral for Dwight G. Cutler was 
held this afternoon at 2 o'cl.ock from 
the family re.sidence, 2229 East Superior 
street. Interment was in Forest Hill 
cemetery. The funeral was attended 
by many friends and busine.ss associ- 
ates, twelve of whom acted as his pall- 
bearers. 



New rulings relative to parcel post 
packages have just been received here 
from the postofflce department at 
Washington. 

In the future all stove castings, 
pieces of machinery and the like must 
bt^ wrapped so that the postoffice 
e.4uipment will ' not in any way be 
damaged. Clothing and dry goods must 
be wrapped so that the packages will 
not break before reaching their des- 
tination. Fragile packages must all be 
marked, while parcels so marked that 
ar.' not reallv fragile, will not be ac- 
cepted at all In the future. Perishable 
articles will only be accepted when ad- 
dressed within the limits of the first 
zone. 



Fine Milans and Hemps in black and colors. Stylishly trim- 
med with flowers, fancy feathers and ribbons, in flat or high 
|H y| ^ C effects. The regular prices are more, but for 
a4« / 3 Saturday selling we offer a remarkably fine 
lot of really fashionable and uncommon distinguished styles 
at only $4.76. 

New White and Light Coloured Hats $5 and Up 

Very modish mid-suinmer models in fine tailored and semi-dressy hats are 
here in Ratines, plain and -figured chiffons, soft mulls and stylish silks. 

Prices range $'6.00 to $15.00. . . • • , ^ , ,. 

You will find an immense amount of personal satisfaction in the*at you select here. 





P^ 



-RUSE^BLEi 



figure. To that end new 
models have been brought 
out which are exactly suited 
to the needs of stout people. 
They have been designed to 
restrict and control any 
exuberance of flesh in such 
a manner as to obtain a 
graceful outline of form 
without sacrifice of hygienic 
freedom of movement. 

In many of the new mod- 
els the bust is low, extreme- 
ly so — just about ^y2 inches 
above the waist line, thus 
giving the diaphragm the 
necessary expansion d e - 
manded by nature. The waist 
line is almost unrestrained, 
permitting entire comfort in 
any position. The hips are 
long and well confined so as 
to show long, almost straight 
lines from arm pit to knee. 
W. B. Reduso Corsets 
are guaranteed to re- 
duce hips and abdomen 
one to five inches. 
They are made of the best 
materials obtainable and are 
warranted not to rust, tear 
or break. 



We especially recommend the new models at $3.00 and 
$5.00. Experts will assist you in selecting and fitting. 



DULUTH-TWIN CITY 
HIGHWAY BOOSTED 



» 



Notice to Milk Dealera. 

Thomas Manlt^y. a representative of 
the Mlnne.-iota Dairy and Food Commis- 
Blon, will be at Room 10. City Hall, 
three days next week. May 26, 27 and 
28, to Issue state milk licenses to all 
dealers in milk. After the 28th the In- 
spector In charge will proceed to en- 
force the re'iutrements of the law 
against any delinquent. 

JOEL G. WINK.TKR. 

Commissioner. 



Advance Agrent Here. 

John Wilatach. who comes from a 
famous family of writers and com- 
posewi. Is In Duluth today arranging 
for the appearance here of John Drew 
next Friday and Saturday in "The Per- 
plexed Husband." 

• 

Mother Is Anxions. 

Edward F. L.angan, 30 years old, a 
machinist, should write a letter to his 
mother at Danvera, Minn., without de- 
lay She is greatly worried about him. 
Mayor Prince received a letter this 
morning asking for assistance In lo- 
cating him. The communication stated 
that he came to Duluth about a month 



Six Counties Represented 

at Enthusiastic Meet 

at Rush City. 

Rush City, Minn., May 23.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — The Duluth-Twln 
City highway scheme was given a great 
boost by the meeting held here yester- 
day afternoon of sixty-five enthusiastic 
good roads advocates representing six 
counties. The necessity for hurrying 
the road to completion this year, along 
the line of the Northern Pacific road 
was recognized by all and unanimously 
decided upon. Curtis M. Johnson of 
this place, secretary of the Twin Cities 
to Duluth Good Roads association, who 
called the meeting and President John 
A. Rystrom of North Branch were con- 
spicuous in the gathering a«d did much 
to encourage the delegates. 

President J. A. Rystrom, who presid- 
ed, outlined the purpose of the gath- 
ering to advocate building a twenty- 
four foot highway from Duluth to the 
Twin Cities, that the larger part of the 
work is completed excepting about fifty 
miles across Chisago. Pine and Wash- 
ington counties and there being a dif- 
ference of opinion as to the route 
through those counties the object of 
the meeting, Mr. Rystrom said, was 
largely to settle that matter. 

' Road Bill Father 9penkM. 

Senator Elwell of MiTineapoli.'?. au- 
thor of the good road measure bearing 



Women's New Kayser "Biiit-I-Nol" Silk Stockings '^'""fIX.^x"*"' 

This patented little device is a decided improvement over ordinary silk stockings; the 
garter clasp when adjusted, stays in place; slips easily into the but- 
tonhole, always with the same tension; never too loose, never too 
tight, and preventing the stockings from "running"; the clasps can- 
not work loose. . , , . , ,. , , i 
We offer these stockings with high spliced heel 
and double soles; small sizes; at $1.50 the pair. 

Children's Fine Plaited Silk Stockings 35c a Pr., 3 Pr. for $1.00 

Tan, white or black stockings for the Uttle folks ; have the ap- ^ 
pearance of an all-silk stocking, and wear very well indeed. All |^ 
sizes, 35c a pair, three pairs for $1.00. y 

$2.00 for Women's $2.50 Mecerizedl WWte Ribbed 

Union Suits 

Low neck, sleeveless, tight knee union suits with 
hand crocheted edges and reinforced material wher- 
ever necessary. All sizes from 34 to 38 in our reg- ^ 
ular $2.50 quality. Special Saturday at $2 the suit. 




Let Us Tell You About Our 
Best Selling $4.00 Shoe 

It is a fifteen button calfskin shoe with short 
vamp which, as you know, is very stylish. A 
tipped box toe and Hgrht stitched welted sole adds 
to the smartness of appearance. A medium hijjh 
heel and a medium high arch adds not only to 
the appearance but very much to the comfort. 
Three other models are here at $4.00 each 
with its particular features and the assort- 
ment of sizes is complete and we want you 
to take the time to be properly fitted 
for in our stock you will find a shoe 
_ exactly suited to your requirements, 

ecify h»n\ these shoes should be made and we think 
11 like them much better than those ordinarily offered 
price. 

We Sell and Recommend Schoirs 

Foot-Easers 

We think that this is the most practical foot rest ever 
devised. It corrects a broken arch and equalizes the body- 
weight by bridging it from heel to toe. We fit them to the 
individual foot in the proper manner. 

We also sell Toe-kights, Bunion Reducers and 
Absorbo Com Pads at our Shoe Department. 




We sp 
you wi 
at this 




his name, explained the ^o^klng of the 
law and said the proposed highway 
would not cost the farmers benefited 
more than Mi -cent to 1 cent an acre, 
with ten years to pay for It. 

Other speakers were: J. H. Arm- 
strong, county surveyor of Ranisey 
county; J. H. Beek, secretary of the 
Associated Commercial clubs of bt. 
Paul: H J. Mullln. representing the 
Duluth Commercial club; C. F. Mahnke, 
the Moose I.ake good roads booster. 
and W. R. McKenzle. secretary of the 



Northern Minnesota Development as- 
sociation. 

All urjfpd the construction of the 
Duluth-Twln City hig^hway. Resolu- 
tions were adopted favoring the pro- 
posed route alonir the line of the 
Northern Pacific as the shortest and 
most direct, and the following were 
named on a committee to appear be- 
fore the state liti;hway commission 
May 27 and obtain its approval of the 
route Indort^ed yest^^rday: 

C F. Mahiike. W M. Cane and F. p. 
Vlbert, Carlton county; Dr. J. D. Park, 
H. J. Mullln and George F. Lindsay, 



St. Loula county; George W. Empy, 
Robert Derr, H. P. Webb, W. P. Hogan, 
Ed Olson, Pine county; Charles An- 
drews, Curtis M. Johnson, J. A. Ry- 
strom, A. Anderson and J. L. McCurdV. 
Chisago county; L.. H. Peter. F. H. 
Murray. J. H. Beek and H. P. Keller, 
Ilamsey ; James E. Elwell. Wallace Q. 
Nye, E. fe. Hubbard. Howard Strong and 
E. Carlson of Hennepin. 

Another meeting of the association 
should be held to further stimulate In- 
terest In the proposition and Forest 
Lake, Washington county, waa decided 



upon as the pla/j« for such meeting 
and June 10 as the date. 

DIVORCE GRANTED TO 
ELLEN M. MONT GOMERY. 

Judge Cant has signed findings In 
favor of Ellen M. Montgomery, who 
sued her husband, Robert D. Mont- 
gomery, for divorce in district court. 
The divorce was granted on the 
ground of desertion. Mrs. Montgomery 



^ 



is 27 and her husband is 26. They 
were married In this city on Feb. 20. 
1910. The desertion Is alleged to have 
taken place on March 12, 1912. 

Montgomery Is an engineer and sur- 
veyor. The case was tried some time 
ago before Judge Cant. Since the case 
was first brought Into court, Andrew 

•Nelson has been substituted for C. C. 
Teare as attorney for the plaintiff. 
The matter of dividing the property 
has been adjusted out of court. 




■»i-]l i 4uiJ Jll I .-^ 



i 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 23, 1913. 



9 



VETERANS W IEL VISIT T HE SCHOOLS 

Assignment of Speakers Is Announced-Exercises Wi 
Be Held Tuesday in All Buildings. 



The schools of the city will be vislt- 
<d next Tuesday by members of the 
G. A. R., Spiinish-Amcrican War Vet- 
erans, Citizens' staff. Sons of Veter- 
ans, Ladies of the G. A. R., Women's 
Relief corps, and Auxiliary of the Sons 
of Veterans. 

The a.^slKnments of members of each 
organization to visit the schools were 
nmde last eveniner. The exercises at 
the Central, Induytrial and Cathedral 
hich schotds will be held at 9 a. m., 
at the Normal school at 11 a. m. and 
at other schools at 2 p. m. 

The assiRnments follow: 

Ctntral liigh school — Comrades S. F. 



White. Gorman post: W. H. Smallwood, 
T H. Prtssnell and .M. W. Bates, Cul- 
ver post; K. H. Dunning and Ut. Rev. 
J. D Morrison, Citizens' stuff; James 
A. Wharton and H. A. Wing. Sons of 
Veterans; W. J. Works, Diggles camp; 
J. Scoit Cash. Camp McEwen; Mrs. B. 
Webster and xMrs. H. V. Wilkinson, 
Ladies of the Grand Army; Mrs. Jens- 
wold, Mrs. Gearhart, Mrs. Morgan and 
Mrs Frt'imuth. Women's Relief corps. 
State normal" school — Comrades D. W. 
Scott and Henry Cleveland. Gorman 
post; J. H. La Vaque. C. E. Holt and C. 
M. Wilson. Culver post; Bishop Mc- 
Golriek and S. S. Williamson, Citizens* 
staff; J H. Norton. Sons of Veterans: 
Cliaries V. McCoy. Diggles camp; Will- 



lam McCormlck, Camp McEwen- Mrs. 
Hugo, Mrs. Borland and Mrs. Lerch, 
Women's Relief corps. 

Parochial school— Comrades LeonUlas 
Merrltt, Gorman post; L. Mendenhall 
and S. W. Clark. Culver post ; A\ . S. 
Moore and P. E. DowlJng, Citizens 
staff; E. F Heller. Sons of Veterans; 
T T. Ames, Diggles camp; Ed Hagarty, 
Camp McEwen; Mrs. J. Dacey, Ladles 
of the Grand Army; Mrs. Burnett, Mrs. 
Nott and Mrs. St. Germain, Women s 
Rt-llef corps. _ 

Bay View Heights scliool — Comrades 
Henry Cliamplin. Gorman post; J. L. 
McPhee and P. Nowak. DiggUs camp; 
A. Catlln, Camp McEwen; Mrs. Kellani. 
Mrs. Glbbs, Mrs. Willis, Women's Relief 
corps 

Adams school — Comrades Cook Ely. 
Culver post; C. F. How, Jr., Citizens' 
staff; A. C. Heller., Sons of Veterans; 
W. O. Flodin and P. W. Swedberg, Dig- 
gles camp; August Fress. Camp Mc- 
Ewen; Mrs. L. A. Cox. Mrs. Rankin. 
Mrs. Nellie Ross. Women's Relief corps. 

Brvant school — Comrades Amasa H. 
Merriam and W. J3rulette. Gorman 
post; W. B. Getchell Citizens' staff; M. 
E Hellar, Sons of Veterans; T L. Chls- 
holm, Diggles camp; C. E. French, 



^ 



\\\\\\Y^:v^v^\v^v\v\\\vvv-v^:v^:-^:v^^^ 



105 & 107 

West 

Superior 

Street 



JiiUvi - MkmJkm 'ii 



f:>lci^usivjb shof> 




T IS surprising, the won- 
derful Suit Values now 
offered by us. 

We have added for tomorrow several 
numbers of TAILORED WHITE 
SERGE SUITS, lined with fine qual- 
ity peau de cygne, excellent workman- 
ship; well worth $25 to $32.50, now 



Make this 
shop your 
downtown y 
stop fe 



New 




$ 



14 



.75 



and 



$ 



19 



.50 



Many new numbers of Tailored and 
Semi-dressy Suits will join the big 
reduction list— 

$J2-50 $14-75 $]g.50 

$25-00 $29-50 $35-00 



Fads and 
Fancies 

The Little Jaunty 
Separate Coats in 
Beautiful Brocaded 
Bengaline Silk, Ot- 
toman Cords, Soft 
Charmeuse, etc. — 
beautifully lined 
with plain or pom- 
padour silks. The 
handsome little coats 
come in a big selec- 
tion of high colors 
and Street shades, as 
well as black, priced 
at $15.00, $17.50, 
$22.50, $25.00, $29.50 
and $35.00. 

Separate Ratine. 
Linen and Eponge 
Coats priced at $7.50, 
$9.50, $12.50 and $15. 



These suits are worth from $17.50 to $58.50 



\:ss 



EXCELLENT COAT VALUES FOR TOMORROW! 





BS i E i s = =s 
3 B A S 3S =s =s 
= = a 



BS S S S S ^^ 

B s s 3 s 5 aa>^ 



«SV»X*VOj<f^2^ 



I 



^ \\/ E make every gar- «fl 
^ vv ment in our own ®i? 

iUililS Cleveland factory, and we sell them ^ 
OTWxi direct to you. You save the mid-^ 
S dleman's profit of $5.00 to $8.00. 






wVKK 



I 



ijd\\iv We guarantee that there is not a particle j^\\\v^ 

^ of cotton in any suit of clothes in our store— we {S 

^ guarantee further that every suit we make will give 8 

perfect satisfaction in every respect— if not, we will Sj 




The Store Which Charges ^^^mm 
^ - - No More Now Than in July ^^i 

^ 20 WEST SUPERIOR ST. S 

Q ST. P.AIX STOIli:— >UXXEAPOLIS STOK?>- A 






9b 



I 44 East Seventh Street. 245 Nleollet Avenue 



s 



^-^v fir ,^ B s ^ 

S S S SS A S '. 




T. gy AJS 



"w m mm mmJSLAJSm 



l^isiyf^ 



I 
I 










Camp McEwen; Mlsa ^,. Buel, Ladies of 
the Grand Army; Mm. 'IwreBton, Mrs. 
Butchart and Mrs. Drennan, Women's 
Uellef corps. 

Kly school — Comrades Austin Moody 
and F. Knowlton, Culvi-r post; Charles 
Salter citizen's staff' W. U. Holcomb, 
Bona of Veterans; C. O. Applehagen and 
M. J. Murray. DiKtSle* camp; Martin 
Rtide, Cump McEwen; Mrs. li. Smith, 
Liudies of the Grand Aimy: Mra. K»eler 
and Mrs. Anna FiUa,l;rault,' Women's 
Relief corps. 

Fairmont school — Qpurades John Dl- 
mond and Frank EI.'' MllltT. (Jorman 
post; J. W. Jolltz, rillzens" staff; H. 
F. Ulgrglns, Sons of Veterans; P. O- 
Clarkson, Diggles camp; Charles Ijoer- 
ke, Camp McKwen; Sirs. H. Sawyer. 
Ladles of the Grand A)-my; Mrs. Carrie 
Cox, Mrs. .Scheffer and Mrs. Farrington 
VVomen's Relief corps. 

Endlon school — Comrades S. M. Kiel- 
ley and W. P. Strickland, Culver pust; 
Charles Adams, Citizens' staff; W. W. 
Huntley, Sons of Vet<?ranH; D. C. W. 
Musser, Diggles ramp; VV. H. Small- 
wood, Camp McEwen; Mrs. Culbertson. 
Mrs. Ida Merrltt, Mrs. Pelto, Women's 
Relief corps; Mrs. A. J. Stark, auxili- 
ary. Sons of Veterans. 

Fond du Lac school — Comrade Asa 
Dalley. Gorman post; C. H. Merrltt, 
Sons of Veterans; J. E. Lawrence, 
Camp McEwen; Mrs. Rakowsky, Miss 
Hazel Kielley, Mrs. Gcuthier, Women's 
Relief corps. 

Ensign school — Comrades E. A. Ty- 
ler and H. Cleveland, Culver post; P. 
George Hanson. Citizens' staff; W. S'. 
McCormlck. Sons of Veterans; W. C. 
Kimball and J. Carhart, Diggles camp; 
T. W. Gunn, Camp McEwen; Mrs. Mary 
Glllon, Mrs. Peer ancl Mrs. Orevar, 
Women's Relief corps. 

Franklin school — Comrades Jacob 
Laux. Amasa McComber, John Q, Ra- 
kowsky and James C. Ferguson, Gor- 
man post; M. B. Cullum and A. A. El- 
der. Citizens' staff; I»ell Heath. Sons 
of Veterans; J. E. McGregor, Diggles 
camp; James T. Wa son, Camp Mc- 
Ewen; Mrs. H. John.st n, I-^dies of the 
Grand Army; Mrs. Bates, Mrs. Eliza 
Kelly and Mrs. Braton, Women's Relief 
corps; Mrs. Ella Foster, auxiliary. 
Sons of Veterans. 

Jackson school — Comrades C E. Holt 
and E. B. F'orce. Culver post; Dr. R. 
W. Bowden and G. H. Vivian. Citizens' 
staff; Warren McComlier, Sons of Vet- 
erans; J. P. Burnett, Diggles camp; 
H. M. Hutchings, Camp McCu«n; Mrs. 

E. Parsons and Mrs. Owells, Ladies of 
the Grand army; Mrr Mary Sullivan, 
Mrs. Robinson and Mrs. Klntz, Women's 
Relief Corps; Mrs. E. F. Heller, auxili- 
ary, Sons of Veterans. 

Irving school — Comrades Daniel G. 
Cash, Hiram White and V. S. Wilkin- 
son, Gordon post; Austin Moody and 
J W. Morgan. Culv* r post; L. A. 
Barnes, Citizens' staff; Frank McCom- 
ber, Sons of Veterans; L. S. Larson and 
C. C. Salter, Diggles camp; A. R. De 
Vohn, Camp McCuen: Mrs. Williams, 
Mrs. Mires and Mrs. Mustonen, W'om- 
en's Relief Corps. 

Lakeside school — Comrades F. Paine 
and M. W. Bates, Culvar post; Clarence 
Dunning and W. A. Hlcken. Citizens' 
staff; Eugene McComber. Sons of Vet- 
erans; D. D. Kreidler, Diggles camji; 
M. C. Parker. Camp McCuen: Mrs. W. 
Beaton and Mrs. Murdock McLean. La- 
dles of the Grand army; Mrs. Arm- 
stead, Mrs. Franklin Paine and Mrs. 
Van Baalln, Women's Relief Corps. 

Lincoln school — Comrades James E. 
Goodman and T. H Pressnell, Culver 
post: R. R. Forward, Citizens' staff; 

F. Q. Hanson. Diggles camp; G. J. 
Sherman, Camp McCuen; Mrs. Dice, Mrs. 
Hyde and Mrs. Paulsc>n, Women's Re- 
lief Corps. 

Jefferson school — Cf mrades John H. 
Baker, John Harrin'g.on and Nels O. 
Roswell, Gorman post; Frank Crass- 
w.-ller and Norton Mattocks, Citizens' 
staff: Amasa McComber, Sons of Vet- 
erans: C Briand, T)ii?gles camp; Al- 
bert La Pojnte, Camp McCuen; Mrs. W. 
Pike and Mrs. A. Merrell, Ladles of the 
Grand armv: Mrs. Still. Mrs. Tischer 
and Mrs. McMillen, Womens' Relief 
Corps. 

Lester Park school — Comrade YeweU 
P. Eaton, Gorman po=?t: A. C. Le Due 
and A. G. McKnight, Citizens' staff: 
James Manson. Sons of Veterans: C. <\ 
Teare, Camp McEwen; Mrs. E. Woods 
and Mrs. Jacob Lautc. Ladles of the 
Grand Armv: Mrs. Goodrich, Mrs. 
Smith, Mrs. Colvln and Mrs. S. Kiels, 
Womens Relief corpF. 

Monroe school — <?omrades S. W. 
Clark and R. C. McCormlck, Culver 
post: Dr. D. H. Day, Citizens' staff; A. 
L. Foster. Sons of Veterans; H. A. 
Hanson. Diggles camp; C. E. Haines, 
Camp McEwen; Mrs. Armstrong, Mrs. 
Nellie Mellin and Mrs. Kate Brown, 
Women's Relief corpfi. 

Longfellow school — Comrades John 
R. Raiidall. John Gates and Cornelius 
W. Donahue Gorman post; C. Dlnwld- 
die. Citizens' staff; H. C. Foster, Sons 
of Veterans: George W. Stiles. Diggles 
camp; O. H. Wetterland, Camp Mc- 
Ewen, Mrs. Lydia Brown, Mrs. Scott 
and Mrs. Thompson, AVomen's Relief 
corps. 

Nettleton school — <::omrades Nelson 
Hoeple and J. H. La Vaque, Culver 
post; W. N. Hart and R. Murchison, 
Citizens' staff; C. F. Anderson and H. 
Ahl Diggles camp; Ht-nry Silver Camp 
McEwen; Mrs. Eraser, Mrs. McNamara 
and Mrs. McGuire, , Wcfrnen's Relief 
corps. 

Lowell school — Comrades Christ Ot- 
tlnger, Gorman post: J. J. Robinson, 
Citizens' staff: W. A. Abbott Sons of 
Veterans: L. Lohmann^ R. M. W'eaver 
and J. D. Schweige"*, Diggles camp; 
Nick Bergerson, Camp McEwen; Mrs- 
Warren. Mrs. Mahoney and Mrs. Medd, 
Women's Relief cofps. 

Madison school — Comrade Charles 
Coya, Gorman post; H. S. Strong. Citi- 
zens' staff; Alonzo Coon and J. C. La 
Vaque, Diggles eamo: J. R. Calvary 
and "U^lliam McKee, Camp McEwen: 
Mrs. Ringsred. Mrs. O'Leary and Mrs. 
Rose Larson. Women's Relief corps. 

Proctor school — Comrade William 
McCollum, Culver pojit; W. G. Studley 
and N. M. Wals-h, Dingles camp; Mel- 
vin M. Turnbull, Camp McEwen; Mrs. 
Rachel Ross and Mrs. Mary King, 
Women's Relief corps. 

C. C. Salter school — Comrades C. M. 
Wilson and James H. Neil, Culver post; 
H. F. Sleepack, Citi5:ens' staff; F. H. 
Wood, Diggles camp: M. C. Miller, 
Camp McEwen; Mrs J. Rankin and 
Mr& T. J. McKeon, Ltdies of the Grand 
Army: Mrs. Thoma.s, Mrs. Humphrey 
and Mrs. Patenande, Women's Relief 
corps. 

Oneota school — Comrades W. C. M. 
Kennedy, Leonidas M-rrltt and John B. 
Thomas, Gorman post; N. C. Bilsey, 
Citizens' Staff: C. H. Robinson, Sons of 
Veterans: C. V. McCcy, Camp Diggles: 
R. McDonald, Camp McEwen; Mrs. 
Harrison and Mrs. Koppcs, Women's 
Relief corps. 

Washington school — Comrade J. W. 
Morgan, Culver post; A. B. Siewert and 
W. L Prtnce. Citizens' staff; E. C. Ros- 
woUl. Sons of Veterais; F. M. Schutto. 
Diggles camp: Marvin McLaren. Camp 
McEwen: Mrs. Randall, Mrs. Weber and 
Miss Carr. Women's Relief corps. 

Washburn school — Comrades D. W. 
Scott. Ira Coburn, PeVer St. George and 
Uriah S. Ayers, Gorman post; Frank 
Church and Marcus L. Fay. Citlzen.s' 
staff: C. J. Stewart. -lOns of Veterans; 
W. H. Smith. Diggles camp; R. C. Hax- 
ton. Camp McEwen: Mrs. White. Mrs. 
Strickland and Mrs. Cornathan, Wom- 
en's Relief corps. 

Whlttier school — Comrade W. B. 
Phelps, Culver post; Guv Warren. Citi- 
zens' staff: Dr. W. H. Salter. Sons of 
Veterans: M. S. Mead. Diggles camp: 
Patrick McCormlck. Camp McEwen; 
Mrs. R. Cooley and Mrs. C. Sutherland, 
Ladles of the Grand Army; Miss .Stev- 
enson, Miss Conlombe and Mrs. Beatty, 
Women's Relief corps. 

Webster school — Comrades Ames 
Frankenfleld and Samuel Anderson. 
Gorman post; C. A. Knlppenberg. Citi- 
zens' staff; Edwin Blackwood. Diggles 
camp; H. P. Brenholrn. Camp McEwen; 
Mrs. Luella Roblnsor and Mrs. Lavlna 
Stlmson, Ladies of :he Grand Army; 
Mrs. Heller, Mrif. S«ew«>tt and Mrs. 
Harker. Women's Relief corps. 

Radlsson school — Comrades John 
Gunn and Samuel Thompson, Gorman 
post; J. A. Blackwood, Sons of Vet- 
erans; Julius Bloetteher and A. fl. 
Block. Diggles camp; P. J. Kendall, 
Camp McEwen; Mrs. J. Denis and Mrs. 
J. Irvine, Ladles of the Grand Army; 
Mrs. Norman, Mrs. \\''ostaway and Mrs. 
Roberts, Women's Relief corps. 

Emerson schofd — Comrades Thomas 
W. Strceter and Tfieophllua Wilson, 
Gorman post; Odin Halden, Citizens' 
staff: P. C. Busha. ?ons of Veterans; 
E. G. Simpson and William Pfltzsmeler, 
Diggles camp; W. L. Pierce, Camp Mc- 
I Ewen; Mrs. Ln Johmion, Ladles of the 
'Grand Army; Mrs. Holt. Mrs, Consldine 




We Alone 

Sell Alfred 

Benjamin & 

Co. New 

York Clothei 

for Men 

and 
Young Men 



CLOTHING CO 



405 and 407 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



Money 
A I ways 
Cheer- 
fully 
Refunded 



JUST RECEIVED ANOTHER SHIPMENT 

OF MEN'S SUITS TO SELL AT 



;r-"lf'.-7 



■:*i: 



iW:- 



mm 






^Hiyl 







— You'll be as excited as we, when you get your first good look 
at them. They're $20.0U, $22.50 and $25.00 Suits, two and three- 
button Sacks and Norfolks, in blues, gravs, tans, browns, stripes 
and checks— the tailoring is of the $20.00, $22.50 and $25.00 
kind — this maker doesn't know how to put out a cheap suit. 
We hope there'll be enough of these suits to supply every man 
who comes for one; but ft's a timely offer and such good ones 
have been known to sell out in one day. Get 
here as soon as you can for your Summer Suit, 
at 



GUARANTEED RAIN PROOF 
SLIP-ONS- 
TOMORROW 
SPECIAL — 



$5.00 



Young Men's Guaranteed All-wool Suits, in blue serges^and 
fancy mixtures — two or three-button, and Nor- 
folk style — the same fabric you pay $15 and $18 
elsewhere ; our price 



1 .'^ucn goou uiics 

$15.00 

blue serges and 

$10.00 



$1.50 
Summer 
Shirts 

with soft collars 
to match, tomorrow 



25c 
Paris 

Garters 



$1.50 Derby 

Ribbed Union 

Suits Tomorrow 

79c 



50c 
New Silk 
Neckwear 

29c 



75c Silk 

Hose 

Tomorrow 

35c 

3 Pairs for $1 



PACKARD SHOES 



EMERY SHIRTS 



GORDON HATS 



m.",.-!!. 



-^ ' ' ' 1 



< '■"■ ■'i -I- - - 



and Mrs Olund, Women's Relief corps. 

Merrltt school — Comrades R. S. Lerch 
and William Carnathan. Culver post; 
leonidas Merrltt, Citizens' staff; W. C. 
Robinson, Diggles camp; J. B. Gibson, 
Camp McEwen: Mrs. Clark, Mrs. h>ex- 
ton and Mrs. Kennedy, Women's Re- 
lief corps. ^ , 

Stowe school, New Duluth — Comrade 
J A. Tucker. Gorman post; Rudolph 
Dletz, Camp McEwen. 

Colbyville school — Mrs. Grace CiUlon, 
Mrs Roe, Mrs. Stevenson and Mrs. 
.Simpson, Women's Relief corps. 

(;'loquet — Comrades McKeon and 
.Smith, Culver post. 

Kruger — Comrade J. Kimball, cul- 
ver post; Emll Lund berg, Camp Mc- 
Ewen. ,, 

Virginia — Comrades James Meyers 
and James Carman, Culver post; 
George Tremble, Camp McEwen. 



MAKE CHICAGO 

QUIET' CITY. 



iil 



Chicago, May. 23— Chicago's great 
orchestra of discordant sounds arising 
from rattling elevated trains, locomo- 
tive whistles, river boat sirens, auto- 
mobile squawkers, the cries of ped- 
dlers and the crowing of roosters, has 
been placed on trial and found guilty 
of being a nuisance. The sentence 
was immediate suppression, and all 
the city ordinances regulating whistles 
and other noises have been ordered re- 
vived. Many of these anti-noise laws 
have been regarded as "dt-ad letters." 

Doctors, lawyers, merchants, mana- 
gers of hospitals and others appeared 
before the anti-noise subcommittee of 
the city council health committee, and 
the result was an agreement that the 
city administration will make every 
effort to reduce noises in the streets 
and especially In the downtown dis- 
trict. 



V. V/S EYES 

Price $1.35 net, by mail, 15o extra. 

How the Girl, fascinating and clever, a social favorite, yet, above 
all, worldly, is brought to the realization of life and her truer self 
by appealing influence of one of the quaintest of characters, V. Vivian, 
"slum doctor," by Henry Sydnor Harrison, author of "QIKED," 

Published and on sale Saturday, May 24th, at 

EDWARD M. STONE'S 

BOOK STORE — THE HOME OF BOOKS. 
221 AVKST SUPERIOR STREET. Dl LVTH. 



/ 



to hold hearings on proposed cur- 
rency legislation. Several Republicans 
had voiced an opposition to the pas- 
sage at this session of any measure 
making sweeping changes in the na- 
tion's financial system. Senator Gallin- 
ger expressed the hope that no Hi- 
matured and hastily constructed cur- 
rency bill would be brought forward 
to occupy the summer months. 

Senator Newlands advanced the idea 
that there should be reserve associa- 
tions in every state in the Union, in- 
stead of the fifteen proposed in the 
monetary commission or the fifteen cr 
twenty understood to be favored by 
Democrats on the hanking committees 
of congress. These associations, Mr. 



Xewlands argued, should be etate-wido 
only in extent, with a banking board 
to provide the central control. 

^ — . — . 

AMhIand Farewell Banquet. 

A.shland. Wis., May 23. — The ^un 
I parlor of the Knight hotel w^as the 
scene of a pleasing event Thursday 
I night when a banquet was tend<=-r<:-d 
to Supt. J. F. Wilson and Principal W. 
1 J. Hocking of the ocal schools, with 
, Chaf'les McDonnell as toastmast^r. 
Toasts were responded to by Mr. Wil- 
son and Mr. Hocking, by President- 
i elect F. J. Shannon, Prof. J. E. Tnomp- 
; son, AVlllis Welktr, Coach Chrsse, Prof, 
i Simpson, Edward Mahoney, Gk-n T.-.y- 
' lor and Roy Hardy. 



BAKER IS KILLED 

IN DOUGH MIXER. 

Springfield. 111.. Mav 23.— John Jas- 
per, head baker at the state hospital 
at Anna, fell into the dough-mixer 
yesterday and was ground to death. 

REAPPORTION 

N EW HA MPSHIRE. 

Concord, N. H.. May 23.— After a 
final session of twenty-six hours 
broken only by occasional recesses, 
the legislature was prorogued by Gov- 
ernor Felker Thursday afternoo . 

Inability to obtain a quorum of 
Democrats to pass a bill estabiisiiing 
new senatorial districts accounted for 
the prolonged session. A quorum was 
obtained and the measure was adopted 
at noon. It was the fir.^t Democratic 
legislature in New Ham ihire In fifty 
years. It was in session i42 days. 

192,000 POUNDS~ 

O F MEA T ARRIVE. 

San Francisco, Cal., May 23.— One 
hundred and ninety-two thousand 
pounds of meat, veal, beef and mut- 
ton, arrived at this port yesterday on 
the steamer Sonoma from Australia. 
This is the third shipment of meat 
recelvid from the Antipodes in the 
campaign to combat the high prices 
asked by local wholesalers. The meat 
is consigned direct to retailers. 

George F. Richards, who represents 
the Australian shippers, was a passen- 
ger on the Sonoma. He comes to this 
country to investigate the facilities for 
storing frozen meats on this coast. He 
will also go to Chicago. 

PLAN HEARINGS^ 

ON MO NEY BILL. 

AVashlngton, May 23. — The senate 
has agreed to a resolution authorizing 
the banking and currency committee 



You'll Do Better at Kelly's 

Trade at the Heart ot Dulutli 




=^ 17 and 19 West Superior St 



■M 



"^ SKIiBitfiaiiWiiniiWI 



jHiw '^imnw 



10 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 23, 1913. 



ALL DULUTH TO JOIN WAR VETERANS IN 
FiniNG OBSERVANCE OF MEMORIAL DAY 



Civic and Military Organiza- 
tions to Participate 
in Parade. 



Rev. W. F. Hovis to Be 

Speaker at Meeting at 

Auditorium. 



Children Will Be Entertained 

With Moving Pictures 

of War Scenes. 



Memorial flay next Friilay will bo 
fittingly observed this year \\'ith a. 
parade at 10 o'clock In tho morning, 
exercisea at the Auditorium followed 
by Ji banquet, motion pictures at the 
Odeum and Lyric theaters for the chil- 
dren in the parade, services for the 
bailor dead on board the United States 
Steamship Gopher at 3 o'clock In the 
afternoon and special services at all 
the cemeteries in the city at 2:30 
O'clock. 

A feature of the exercises this year 
■tsill bt> the motion pictures to be 
shown at the Odeum and I^yric the- 
aiers free of cliurge to all the school 
Childri-n in the parade. Thomas Fur- 
hi.-is, manager oi the two theaters, has 
tl'">nated the use of them to the children 
takli.g part in the parade. They will 
fall out after tlu- parade is over, about 
10:30 o'clock, and march to the two the- 
aters, where Mr. Furniss has arranged 
to show several reels of pictures ap- 
propriate to the day. 

Jolm G. Rakow.sky will act as the 
honorary grand marshal of the parade 
and L.ieut. Col. F. E. Resche of the 
Minnesota National Guard, grand mar- 
aluii. Ueut. K. M. Weaver of the Na- 
tional Guard will be chief of staff, with 
the following acting as aides: Capt. 
b. F. White, O. A. K.; Capt. S. W. Clark, 
O, A. It.; Capt. E. D. Pt-ek. U. rf. A.; 
Litut. T. W. Gunii, U. S. A.; CoL M. M. 
Gasser, M. N. G.; Capt. C. C. rialter, 
fcons of V'eteran-s. Capt. D. E. Case, Citi- 
Bens' Staff; Col. A. H. Paul, I. O. O. 
F. , Col. Joseph Gibson, U. ti. W. V.; 
Lieut. F. G. Hanson. U. S. W. V. 

Arrangements for the parade are in 
charge of the Citizens' Staff, of which 
fH. R Dunning is president; C. 3. Pros- 
per vice president; T. F. Upham, sec- 
retary; J. E Horak, treasurer, and 
Frank Crassweller. Carroll Graff, Judge 

B. A. Dancer, H. A. Earnshaw and A. 
H. Davenport, executive committee. 

Mr. Dunning yesterday afternoon an- 
nounced the program and line of march 
lor the parade as follows: 
Urdrr of Parade. 

All organizations will take post on 
West First street and connecting ave- 
nues, as detailed. 

Each battalion or independent or- 

franizatlon, on coming on the line, will 
eave a distance of twenty paces be- 
tween its right and the left of the pre- 
ceding organization. 

All organizations will be in line, 
ready to move at not later than 9:45 
a. m.. and each commanding officer, 
when ready, will report to the aide of 
the grand marshaJ In charge of his 
aivision as follows: 

First divison— Capt. E. D. Peck, U. 
fi. A. 

Second dlvlson — Capt. D. E. Case, 
Citizens' Staff. 

Third division — Capt. C. C. Salter, 
Cons of Veterans. 

Fourth division — Capt. C. S. Prosser, 
Citizens' Staff. 

Fifth division— Capt. S. W. Clark, Q. 

A R 

At 9:45 o'clock, the chief bugler will 
aound attention and at 10 o'clock the 
parade will start. 

The order of formation will be as 
follows: 

Honorary grand marshal, John G. 
Rakowskv and .«taff; grand marshal, 
Lieut Coi. F. E. R-^srhe, M. N. G.; chief 
of staff. Lieut. R. M. Weaver, M. N. G.; 
aides Capt. S. F. White. G. A. R., Capt. 
8. W.' Clark. G. A. R., Asa Dalley. Q. A. 
R., Capt. E. D. Peck. U. S. A., Lieut. 
T. W. Gunn, Col. M. M. Gasser, Capt. 

C. C. Salter, Sons of Veterans, Capt. 

D. E. Case. Citizens' Staff. Col. A. H. 
Paul. I. O. O. F.. Col. Joseph Gibson, 




REV. W. F. HOVIS, 
Speaker. 



E. B. DUNNING, 
President, Citizens* Staff. 




MAYOR W. I. PRINCE. 



U. S. W. v., Lieut. F. G. Hanson, U. S. 
W. V. 

First Division. 

Form on southwest corner of Third 
avenue west and First street, facing 
east. 

First DivUion. 
Form on southwest corner Third ave- 
nue west and First street, facing 
east. 
State Military and Naval Forces. 
Third Regiment Band. 
First Battalion, Third Infantry Mlnne- 

n.^sota National Guard. 
MaJ. H. V. Eva, M. N. G., Commanding. 

Staff: 
Company E, Third Infantry, M. N. G., 

Capt. G. W. Stiles. 
Company C, Third Infantry, M. N. G., 

Capt. W. O. Flodin. 
Company A, Third Infantry, M. N. G., 
Capt. Robert Lee. 

Minnesota Naval Malitla. 
Commander Guy A. Eaton, M. N. M., 
commanding. 

Staff: 
First Division, M. N. AL, Lieut E. G, 

Smith. 
Second Division, ^L N. M., Lieut. Car- 
hart. 

Second Division. 
Form on southwest corner Fourth ave- 
nue west and First street, facing 
east. 
Citizens' Staff. Government and City 
Employes. 
Capt. D. E. Case in Charge. 
U. S. Mail Clerks and Postmen, under 
Command of Postmaster A. P. Cook . 



LIEUT. COL. F. E. RESCHE, 
Grand Marshal. 

and Asst. Postmaster A. C. Weld. 
Duluth Fire Department under com- 
mand of Chief Joseph Randall. 
Speakers and Singers in Carriages. 
Third Division. 

Form on southwest corner of Fifth 
avenue west and First street, facing 
east. 

Fraternal Orders. 

Division No. 1, Ancient Order of Hiber- 
nians. 

Division No. 4, Ancient Order of Hiber- 
nians. 

Division No. 6, Ancient Order of Hiber- 
nians. 

Union of St. Jean Baptlste-de-Duluth. 

Court St. Ix>uls No. 177, Catholic Order 
of Foresters. 

Sons of Vasa. 

St. Jean Baptiste Benevolent Society, 
and other fraternal societies whose 
acceptance was received after going 
to press. 

Fourth Division. 

Form on Fourth avenue west, right 
resting on First street. 
School Boys. 
C. S. Prosser In Command. 

First Section — G. H. Davenport, mar- 
shal; East end, Lakeside and Hunter's 
Park schools. 

Second Section — 9. A. Foster, marshal; 
West end and West Duluth and New 
Duluth schools. 

Third Section — Jacob Laux, in charge; 
Parochial schools. 

Fifth Division. 

Form on upper side of First street 



with right retfHnt? tn Fourth avenue 
west. 

War Veterans and Sons of Veterans. 
G. A. R. Drum COrpi, Capt. Asa Daiiey. 
Sons of Volerans. 
United Hpanish War Veterans. 
Camp John CJ. McEwtn, No. 6. 
Camp Maj. A. M. Dlgi^lea, No. 13. 
errand Army of tlio Republic. 
Gorman Post, G. A. i;., No. 13, in Auto- 
mobiles. 
Culver Post, O. A. R^ No. 128, in Auto- 
moblli>s. 

The line of march will bo south on 
Second avenue east to Superior street, 
west on Superior street to Fifth ave- 
nue, north on Fifth avenue to First 
street and east on First utreut to the 
Avidltorium. 

W'hen the head of tie parade reaches 
First avenue wewt «u>>l First street It 
win halt and foiinTlne facing north. 
The members of the wo Grand Army 
posts will then 'ride In front of the 
line, reviewing it. 

At the reviewing stand Captains 
Robert Lee, G. W. Stlle.s and W. O. 
Flodin of the National Guard will re- 
view the school cliUdren in the parade. 
To the two schools making the best 
appearance In the line of march the 
Citizens' Staff will award each a silk 
flag. One of the flafe.s will go to the 
best school west of the Point of Rocks 
and the other to the school east of 
the Point of Rocks. Tiie two flags will 
be awarded according" to the decision 
of the reviewing officers. The flags 
were purchased by tlite staff and will 
be competed tor each year. The school 
winning a flag three times In succes- 
sion retains permanent possession 
of it. 

ProKrani at Auidltorliim. 
After the parade the aeliooi children 
will march to the Odeum and Lyric 
theaters, while the ot;hers will be en- 
tertained at the Auditorium. The pro- 
gram for the Auditorium as announced 
by Mr. Dunning Includes an address by 
Rev. W. P. Hovis of the Kndion M. E. 
church and the follov/ing numbers: 

Selection 

Drum Corps, Gorman Post, G. A. R. 

Introduction 

Presiding Officer, "3. B. Dunning, 
President Citizens' Staff. 

Address 

W. I. Prince, Mayor of Duluth. 
Logan's first order, ^lay 5, 18C8, In- 
stituting memorial service 

James A. Tucker, i^djutant Gorman 
Post, G. A. R. 

Invocation 

Kev. W. W. Lawrence, Glen Avon 
PresbyteriaiL Church. 

Selection 

Imperial Quartet. 

Lincoln's Getty.sburg address 

Mason M. Forbes. Assistant County 
Attorr ey. 
Vocal selection — "Stai- Spangled Ban- 
ner" 

Mrs. Leo A. Ball. 

Address 

Rev. W F. Hovis, Endion M. E. church. 
Reading— "In Memory of Charles F. 

Johnson" 

Mrs. A. B. Hilton. 
Roll call for the dead for the past 

year 

Gorman Post, Q. A. R. 
Culver Post, Q. A. R. 
Camp John G. McEwen, U. S. W. V. 
Camp A. M. piggies, U. S. W. V. 
Sons of Veterans. 
(Read by Adjutant of Each Organiza- 
tion.)- 

Benediction 

Rev. C. N. Thorp, Second Presbyterian 
Church. 
Following the program and exercises 
a banquet will be served at Memorial 
hall to all those holding tickets, by 
Garfield Circle No. 4, Ladles of the G. 
A. R., assisted by the auxiliaries of 
the Sons of Veterans and the United 
Spanish War Veterans, and all the 
other women's orgar izatlona. Tickets 
will be given only to the veterans. 
Sons of Veterans, Spanish War Vet- 
erans, and the citizens' staff. 

The ceremony of decorating the 
graves In the varic us cemeteries In 
the city ^ill be held at 2:30 p. m. Com- 
rade Asa Dalley of Gorman Post will 
be in charge. 

Naval Memorial Ser\'i<*e. 
At 3 o'clock a meriorlal service will 
be held on board the Gopher In mem- 
ory of the sailor dead. 



^ 



^\^^^\^^\^ \ ^^\v^^'.^^\-^■\^^^^^^^^'.<^t^^<: ^TC■^T^V^':^':g:s 



/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 

; 

? 

/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 

:; 



We Want to Talk 
Suits to You 



and show how we save you $5.00 or more on any suit 
purchase you make here. We are in position to save 
you money on clothing because we buy in big quanti- 
ties for our several stores and thereby get extra dis- 
counts and they go to you. Come and see. 



V 



FLOAN & LEVEROOS 

225 AND 227 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



;3SS5ssx?r^::vv^xTOr^\\!A:A 




Si 



1|^xi^S]^J$md^l0!h£5 



number combined, twenty-five ducks, 
geese, snipe or plover, each or com- 
bined. 

The new law creates deputy game 
wardens in each of the twelve judicial 
districts. This makes a smaller terri- 
tory for each warden and should make 
for better enforcement of the law and 
protection of the game. 

Resident licenses for shooting are 
|1 and $25 for non-residents. No fish- 
ing or rod licenses are required. The 
fishing regulations prohibits pike fish- 
ing earlier than May 1, and bass earlier 
than June 1. A state hatchery is op- 
erated at Lake Upsllon, near St. John. 

The game protection is in the hands 
of a state game and fish board of 
control, with the power to appoint 
chief game wardens in two districts 
and twelve deputies, with specials. 
There is a fish commissioner appointed 
by the governor, but under control of 
the board. ^ 

HOMESTEADER 

IS FOUND DEAD 



ATTENTION ! 

All member* of St. J Jan Baptiste society 
are requested to meet lit St. Jean Baptlsta 
hall. Saturday morning at 8 a. m. tharp. for 
the purpose of attendlnii the funeral of our 
late brother, Louis Beau-ivaje. By order of 

A. BOISSONNEAULT, Pre*. 

A. J. Vf.l -LET, Rec. Sco. 





^g^^mt^m^^s^^^^ 





FA VOR I TE— Mahogany or Oak 

With 26 $ r^ r\ 1 n 

Selections.. "4^ J^ \l • * ^ 
EASY PAYMENTS 

Most Popular Proposal Ever Made to Music Lovers 

Grafanola Favorite, with 26 selections, including the great sextet from Lucia and the 
famous quartet from Rigoletto, for which two selections alone manv people have paid $13.00 
—enough of the best music for an entire evening's entertainment. Keep your boys and girls 
home evenings by giving them and yourself good music and entertainment from the world's 
greatest artists. 

The motor is a powerful three-spring; the speed is regulated by a graduated scale. The 
reproducer, which is the same as in the $200 machine, is operated beneath the lid, and the 
found waves are led through the tone arm to the tone chamber, which is entirely separate 
from .notor mechanism and is scientifically constructed, {)atterned after the Violoncello j here 
the tones are amplified and thrown out through the opening, subject to control at your will 
by the partial or complete closing of the "Tone Control Shutters.' 

If vou have been waiting for the perfected talking machine, don't wait any longer^ jt^ 
bjyjL- ll^QU cunaot come in, write for catalog and particulars of our other offci"*. 

DOU BLE DISC REC O RDS 65c 

W. IVI. EDlViOMX, 



Exclusive Agent for This Territory, 



18 Third Avenue West 



SPORTSMEN LIKE 

NEW GiAME LAWS 



North Dakota Hunters Be- 
lieve Game Will Be Well 
Protected. 

Fargo, N. D., May 28.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — North Dakota sportsmen 
are well pleased ■\rlth the Improve- 
ments in the game law by the last 
legislative session. The measure pro- 
vides for the abolition of spring shoot- 
ing, a closed season on deer, a per- 
petual closed season on partridge, 
pheasants and quail, and for additional 
deputy game wardens for the better 
protection of game. 

No deer can be killed till Nov. 10, 
1916, and after that only bucks can be 
shot. 

Protect Partrldgren and Pheasants. 

B'or some years partridge and pheas- 
ants have been inultiplying In the 
Turtle mountain country. A perpetual 
closed season has been made against 
them, which will permit the wooded 
sections of the state to be well stocked 
with the birds. 

Under the presert law, partridge, 
pheasants of all ki ids and swan are 
perpetually protected. Antelope, beaver 
and otter are protected until 1920, and 
deer cannot be shot until 1916, chickens 
and grouse can be snot each year from 
Sept. 7 to Nov. 1, ducks and geese from 
Sept. 7 to Dec. 15. 

The bag limit is ten prairie chickens, 
grouse, turtle dove or crane or that 



Naval Swedish Veteran Who 
Went Through Great Ship- 
wreck Dies Alone. 

Spooner, Minn., May 23.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Charles Sealander, a 
homesteader, 67 years of age. who has 
been living alone on the Big Grassy 
river on the Canadian side, was found 
dead in his cabin this week. He is 
presumed to have died from heart 
failure. . „ ^. , 

He was a veteran of the Swedish 
navy and was serving on the Ored 
when that vessel was wrecked on the 
English coast In 1866. He leaves a 
son of this place and a daughter in 
Michigan. 

LOST~NE AR WA RROAD. 

Sidney Arends Probably Lost in 
Woods of That Section. 

Warroad, Minn., May 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— Sidney Allen Arends, 
aged 11, has left his home near 
America, about ten miles south of 
here and his relatives are very much 
concerned over hia disappearance, 
fearing he has been lost In the woods 
in that locality. He disappeared Frl- 
dav. May 15. He is dark complexloned. 
He"nry Arends of America, Minn., hU 
father. Is worried over the affair and 
asks public assistance in finding hla 
boy. 



AN EXPERIMENT, 

IT WORKED 

The phvsician was Dr A. E. Scott of 
948 Market Street, Han Francisco. We 
are passing this Iteir to the press with- 
out his permission and without having 
seen him. First — Because It is a fact, 
and Second — Becaust; the public ought 
to know It. 

Seven Oregon phy.'^lcians had been 
consulted In a critical case of Bright's 
Disease. Patient's family was told 
there was no hope. The heart was so 
enlarged he could not llo down and 
he had the short breathing that often 
appears in the finale of this disease. 
Patient had slept two weeks sitting up 
when they started for Southern Cali- 
fornia He was so short of breath he 
feared he would die In the sleeper and 
stopped In San Francisco to consult 
a physician. They <>aUed In Dr. Scott. 
As the Oregon phys leans had done ev- 
erything the old school knew, he pre- 
scribed Fulton's Renal Compound, aid- 
ing it with heart and ellmlnatlve treat- 
ment Ten weeks thereafter the albu- 
men was nearly out patient was gain- 
ing strength, sleeping like a child and 
left for home. 

Just before leaving he called and 
gave us the above f iCts In person. Ha 
said his stopping in San Francisco had 
saved his life. 

If you have Brighl.'s Disease you owe 
It to yourself and family to try Ful- 
ton's Renal Compound before giving 
up. It can be had at druggists sup- 
plied by Lelthhead Drug company. 

For pamphlet on our Investigation 
Into the curability df Bright's Disease, 
write John J. Fulton Co., San Fran- 
cisct^ 



JOINT SC HOOL MEETING. 

Boards of Negaunee, Marquette and 
Ishpeming to Have Conference. 

Negaunee, Mich., May 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The school boards of 
Negaunee, Ishpeming and Marquette 
will meet at the Negaunee high school, 
Thursday afternoon. May 29, when 
many of the problems which are now 
confronting the boards will be brought 
up for discussion. A committee ap- 
pointed at the last Joint session of th..- 
boards to consider school legislation 
will make Its report. William P. 
Belden of Ishpeming, a member of the 
Ishpeming school board. Is chairman 
of thi.s committee. 

Besides the boards of the three 
cities, Orr Schurtz of Negaunee, E. E. 
Scribner of Ishpeming, and G. H. Geh- 
rand of Marquette, superintendents of 
schools; Prof. J. H. Kaye, president of 
the Northern State normal school at 
Marquette, and A. E. Sterne, county 
school commissioner, will be in at- 

The members of the school boards 
of the three large cities are: 

Negaunee — Cyrllle Houle, Dr. J. H. 
Andru.s, John W. Elliott, Thomas Con- 
nor.si and R. G. Jackson. 

Ishpeming— Fred Tonnesen, W. P. 
Belden J. G. Welch, John Skoglund 
and T.'h. Bargh. ..,, ♦ r^ a 

Marquette— J. F. Neldhart, E. S 
Bice D. H. Ball, H. W. Hornbogen and 
James O'Reill y. 

ASHLAND ATHLETES 

GOI NG TO MADISON. 

Ashland. Wis., May 23.— Ashland will 
send six athletes to the state high 
school athletic meet which will be 
held at Madison tomorrow. The boys 
who will take part In the meet are 
Milton Gardner. Glenn Taylor, Edward 
Srhrank, Harold Engelke. Edison 
Henry and Arthur Peterson. They will 
be accompanied by Principal Hocking 
and Prof. Thompson^ 

RESPITE^EN 

L ABOR LEADERS. 

Washington, May 23.— The mandate 
of the district court of appeals that 
Samuel Gompers should l5« Jn^?^ fO"^,<| 
for thirty days and that John Mitchell 
and Frank Morrison should bo lined 
$500 each for contempt of court In the 
noted stove and range case has been 
stayed to permit attorneys for the 
labor leaders to appeal to the supreme 

court. 

. — -♦ 

Made Mine Su|»ertntendeiit. 

Negaunee, Mich., May 23.-^ohri E. 
Nelson, who for the past seventeen 
year.s lias been employed at. the Hartford 
Cambria and Llllle mines, has been 
promoted to the position of superin- 
tendent of the properties, which are 
operated bv the Republic Steel & Iron 
company. Mr. Nelson succeeds the late 
Capt John Deacon, who passed away 
last week, and has worked up from 
the bottom, starting aa an under- 
ground miner at the Lillie mine seven- 
teen years ago. 





FOR SATURDAY 

IN OUR BASEMENT HOUSEFURNISHING DEPARTMENT 



I 



10 quart galvanized Water Pails, 

1 gallon tin Coal Oil Cans, 
14 quart tin Rinsing Pans, 
10 quart tin Flaring Pails, 

2 quart tin Coffee Pots, 
Fancy Japanned Cuspidors, 

1 quart graduated lipped Measures, 
No. 14 covered Dust Pans, 

2 quart covered tin Buckets, 
No. 10, pieced Cullenders, 

2 quart pieced Sauce Pans, 

6 cup plain Muffin Pans, 

Milk Strainers, brass cloth, 

1 quart riveted Dippers, 

6 quart plain Milk Pans, 

No. 100 Superior Graters, 

No. 13 deep Bread Pans, 

1 quart bailed Milk Kettles, 

No. 2 Champion Sieves, 

4 quart deep, plain Pudding Pans, 

12^-inch plain Wash Basins, 

These are all A No. 1 quality tin. 
Each and every piece guaranteed. 



Each Piece Worth 
15c to 25c 

SATURDAY 

YOUR 
CHOICE 

10c 




•-♦ 



SHOE POLISHES 

lDEALEP** Easiest to use— Best for all shoes 



i 



1 



For Quick Results Use Herald ^'Wants' 




a^^^..^U^,'^»ili„.^ld^li-t^m 




Take off your coat 



Wear a 



d 



Summit 

Town and 
Country 

Shirt 



You'll be well dressed and thoroughly comfortable 
-no matter how hot the day. 

Why not enjoy comfort and be good natured. 

The soft attached standing collar is right on the 



•rl 



I 



shirt. 



GET YOURS TODAY 



To be had at all shops that sell shirts. 

GUITERMAN BROS. 

MAKERS 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 



\ 



> 



/ 




Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 23, 1913. 



11 



The grocer 
returns your 
money if you 
are not satisfied 
with CampbelFs 
Tomato Soup. 

We know that it is so pure, so 
wholesome, so inviting, that we are 
glad to leave the whole question of 
its satisfying quality on your table, 
entirely with you. 

We not only authorize the gro- 
cer to refund the money for every 
can of Campbell's Tomato Soup 
which does not prove satisfactory, 
but we refund to him the full retail 
price. 

When you stop to think of the 
many million cans of this popular 
Campbell **kind" which have been 
sold always with this distinct under- 
standing, isn't this the strongest pos- 
sible guarantee that it will satisfy you? 



\ MARRIAGE 
IS ANNULLED 

Miss Antonio Vollen No 

Longer Bound to Chris 

Walhood. 



Affidavit of First Wife Has 
Straightened Out Matri- 
monial Tangle. 



I Chris Walhood of Pekin. N. D., whc 
i fiyurea as a principal in a strange 
; story of double life, no longer has 
I any claims, matrimonial or otherwise, 
j on Miss Anna (Antonio) Vollen of this 
I city, who rehearsed a marriage cere- 
I mony with him at Bessemer, Mich., on 
! Jan. 3. 1912. 

j In district court today, Judge Bert 
I Feeler read the deposition of Clar Klt- 
! tleson Walhood of Glen, Colo., which 
I was evidence of a prior marriage, and 
■ then signed findings in favor of Miss 
I Vollen in the suit which she brouglit 
I for the annulment of her marriage. 
I Walhood was married to Clara Kit- 
' tleson at Hudson, Wis., on Dec. 27, 
I 1910. They separated soon after their 
marriage and have never lived togeth 





TOMATO 

OUP 



10c a can 
Look for the red-and-white label 



L 






BRYCE WRITES ADIEU 
TO AMERICAN PEOPLE 



Sends Letter of Apprecia- 
tion and Affection Be- 
fore Sailing. 

Washington, May 23. — James Bryce, 
former ambassador from Great Britain, 
just before leaving American soil sent 
back from San Francisco a letter of 
appreciation and affection to the 
American people. The letter, made 
public today, was in reply to one from 
residents of Washington expressing 
their regret at his leaving. It referred 
to his well known interest In the 
plans for the beautlflcatlon of the na- 
tional capital. 

"1 am glad to think that an English- 
man who loves the United States and 
Its people," the former envoy wrote, 
"is not debarred by an official position 



from taking, in all your projects for 
the artistic development of the national 
capital, an interest as keen as any 
that your own citizens could take." 

Among the signers of the letter of 
regret and farewell to the ambassador 
were Admiral Dewey, MaJ. Gen. Wood, 
chief of staff of the army; Giftord 
Pinchot, former chief forester; Thomas 
Nelson Page, and more than a score of 
others prominent in local and official 
circles. 



BOUNDAR Y SU RVEYORS. 

Engineers Marking International 
Boundary Are at Spooner. 

Spooner. Minn.. May 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — A party consisting of C. 
H. Sinclair, E. A. Barnard. Jesse Hill 
and J. H. Van Wayman of the United 
Statef and Canadian boundary survey 
arrived here from Warroad today. They 
have chartered the Collins boat Mantasta 
and will use it in their work for the 
next few weeks. The boundary is be- 
ing marked with suitable monuments 
all along the line. 



We Are Crowded to the Limit With a Fresh 
New Stock Priced on the Low Rent Basis. 



ic^ 



mm 




FORMERLY 

AndersonThoorsell' 

fURNITURE Ca 



^^^W 



2I»AVE.W.& 
SUPERIOR ST. 

7j^e Bi^ house witb t^e UttURent: 



Leather Chairs 




PRICE «°'" 

■^ "^"^^^ CtOSlNO EASV PAYMENTS 

We mu.st make room. Therefore and for no other reason do we 
take an actual loss on these fine big Leather Chairs. They are samples — 
and samples you know are always good and "better than regular stock." 
So here they go — 

One $40.00 Leather Chair at $20.00 

Three $50.00 Leather Chairs at $25.00 

One $65.00 Leather Chair at $32.50 



er .since. Although no divorce proceed- 
ings were had, Waihood induced Miss 
Vollen of this city to marry him. 
Shortly afterwards she learned that 
he already had a wife living and 
brought an action to have the mar- 
riage annulled. 

A few days after his second mar- 
riage Walhood met his first wife and 
entered into an agreement with her 
in writing that she relinquish all 
rights on his property for a considera- 
tion of IJ500, which was paid to her. 
The contract which was made also 
stated that they were to live apart 
from one another and that if one 
started suit for divorce, it was not to 
be resisted by the other. Such a con- 
tract would be held void in 
courts. 

It is understood that the first 
lias started divorce proceedings. 



the 
wife 



COMMENCEMENTS 
IN NORTH DAKOTA 



Graduation Exercises at 

Wahpeton, Grafton and 

Cando Announced. 

Wahpeton, N. D., May 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— The largest class In 
the history of the Wahpeton high 
.school will be graduated this year as 
follows: Ruth Babcock, William Berg- 
man, Robert Beatty, Anna Boll, Hattie 
Bagg, Esther Bowman, Marjorie 
Crooks, Donavan Dlvet. Eda Evenson, 
Arnold Forbes. Alfred Forman, Alga 
Holcomb, Mabel Hickey, Jeanette Kra- 
mer, Max Lander, Mollle Medved, Ut- 
mer Manchester, Otto Oien, Ellwood 
Patterson, Hazel Swank. Paul Simon- 
son, Ida Thompson, Inger Simonson, 
Esther Yates and Grace Van Arnam. 



Grafton Commencement. 

Grafton, N. D., May 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Commencement exer- 
cises of the high school open tomor- 
row with the reception for the senior 
class; Sunday the baccalaureate ser- 
mon will be delivered; Thursday next 
the junior commencement takes place 
and Friday, May 31, the final com- 
mencement exercises occur. Rev. H. 
J. Glenn gives the baccalaureate ser- 
mon and J. H. Worst gives the com- 
mencemetn address. The class mem- 
bers are Henry C. Anderson, John 
Archer, Betsy Bergom, Henry Brosna- 
han, Denora Chrlstenson, Anna Copps, 
Clara Dahl, Mary Dahl, Harriet Han- 
son, Oscar Hellerud, Claire Hoisveen, 
Henry Jackson, Melvie Johnson, Hazel 
Lykken, Isabel Lykken, Mabel Lykken, 
Editha McAuley, John Mollers, Julia 
Nelson. Gladys Newell, Charles Noll- 
man, George Nollman, Katrin Olafson, 
Clara Rye, Edwin Schumacher, Ruth 
Sterling and Henry Swlggum. 



To Leave Cando Hl«li. 

Cando, N. D., May 23.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Cando high school 
commencement will take place May 31 
with Dr. C. C. Creegan delivering the 
addrt-ss, -Rev. S. Suthedland preaching 
the baccalaureate sermon. The grad- 
uates are Gladys Johnson, Estelle Dun- 
bar Marie Harris, Ruby Bradshaw, 
Gladys Copeland, Ruth Pile, Elsie Brit- 
tin, Ella Strong, Alma Plummer, Grace 
Brlttin, Frank Powell, Joe McCune. 
Robert Mahood. Dick Brooke, Albert 
Eidman and Vernon Jones, 



"Dick Withlngton and His Cat," 
three-reel feature for the children at 
the Lyceum tomorrow. 



ALEXANDER, N. D., TO 
HAV E PUR E WATER. 

Alexander, N. D., May 23.— (Special to 

The Herald.) — Alexander is to have an 
unlimited supply of the purest spring 
water. It is sufficiently large to supply 
a town ten times the size of this. For 



MAY BE AMERICAN 

MINISTER TO CUBA 




WILLIAM E. GONZALES. 



E. 



Washington, May 23.— William 
Gonzales of Columbia, S. C, will be 
named as American minister to Cuba. 
This report came from the White 
House. He Is a brother of N. G. 
Gonzales, editor of the Columbia State, 
wlio was shot and mortally wounded by 
Lieutenant Governor J. rt. Tillman on 
the street In Columbia in January, 1903. 






Bargains in Laces 

Valenciennes Laces; 

2y2c 

Laces, 4 /J^ 

l\:/ 5c 



1,51X) yards of Se 
sale price, per 
yard 

10c Valenci<:nnes 
inches wide, yard 

lOo Torchor 
inches wide, 



I. aces, 
yard. . 





and 2a WEST SUPERIOR STREET 



A BIG BULLETIN OF SATURDAY SPECIALS! 



Wotnen^s and Misses* 
Fashionable Suits 

Another lot just received — purchased at a considerable saving. 
We have a<lded to these our own stock and grouped, them into 
lots, for quick selling. The styles are strictly new, the fabrics 
beautiful, the values wonderful. 

$15.00 for choice of Suits easily worth $19.50 to $22.50 

$17.50 for choice of Suits easily worth $25.00 

$19.50 for choice of Suits easily worth $27.50 

$22.50 for choice of Suits easily worth $32.50 

Plain tailon.'d novelties and exclusive models. Wc urge you to 
see these Suits on sale Saturday, the values are wonderful. 

Wonnen^s and Misses^ Coats 

Special Features for Saturday 



LOT 1 — Late style Coats, ten distinct styles; made up 
leading fabrics; present day actual value $12.50; 
choice 



in the 



$8.50 

edford Cords 

$12.50 

1 Eponges, Bed- 

$17.50 



LOT 2 — Beautiful new styles in Men's Wear Serge, Bedford Cords 

and Novelties; actual values $17.50 to 

$19.50; choice 

LOT 3 — Exclusive styles, one or two of a kind, in Eponges, Bed- 
ford Cords, Diagonals and Novelties; Coats 
that sold at $22.50 and $25.00; choice 

CHILDREN'S COATS— In white Serge and dark colors, also 
pretty checks and stripes; neat, clever styles; sizes 2 to 6 years; 
three very .special values for Saturday at $3.50, 
$2.75 and 

25 DOZEN WAISTS just received; made up in beautiful .'=;heer 
fabrics; dainty, new styles, Bulgarian trimmed, also 
lace and embroidered; easily worth $1.50; choice... 



$1.95 



98c 



Extra Special 
Values in 
Silk Hose 

Women's 35c Silk Boot Hose, in 
black and white, lisle top, heel and 
toe; heavy quality silk O ^/% 
fiber, at ^ i^C 

Women's Phoenix Silk Hose, the 
75c quality, slightly imperfect, and 
the famous Wayne Knit- fif/)^^ 
ting Mills' Silk Hose, at...O\/C 

$1.25 Silk Hose, in white, tan and 
black; pure silk, heavy garter top; 
reinforced heel and C^ "1 /)/! 

Women's 3Sc Union Suits, lace 
trimmed, wide knee; all O^^ 
sizes at dmif OCo 

Women's 12j.4c Vests, fine ribbed; 
regular and extra large "1 i\^ 
sizes at X "v' 

Men's 15c 
Hose at . 



White Foot 



lOc 
25c 



mili- 



Men's 35c Silk Fiber 
Hose at 

Men's $2.00 Negligee Shirts, 

r.r"": $1.00 

Men's 75c Night Shirts, /^Q/* 
great value at %^%^^ 

Children's 39c Rompers, 
all sizes, at 



Wash Goods 
Department 

Special Items 
for Tomorrow. 

39c qualitv Silk Striped Marqui- 
sette, in white and colored ground- 
work; a good assort- "1 Q^ 



ment at 

27-inch wide plain and 
Ratine, Crepe and Silver 
Tissue at 



white 
noth- 

19c 



25c 



colored 

25c 

40 pieces, 29 inches wide, IZlic 
quality Holly Batiste to ^IJL^g* 
close at, per yard § jZak^ 

25<: quality 32-inch cream 
Cotton Serge for wash suits; 
ing better tor children's 
w ear at, per yard 

35c quality 32-inch Silk Organdies; 
all new designs and warranted fast 
colors, at, per O^^^ 

yard ^OC 

27-inch Red Seal and Everett Shirt- 
ing Ginghams; they come in 
stripes, checks and plaids, also 
plain colors, at, per fil>i>/» 

35c quality 40-inch colored striped 
Voiles; good assortment; blue, 
pink, lavender and black and white 
stripes, at special, per "1 O/* 

yard -■• ^^ 



u 



a 



vl 
ri 
rl 
rl 
ri 

In 
ri 

M 
In 



Specials In Bed- 
spreads 

$1.25 full siie Bedspreads Ofi/* 

$1.59 extra large Bed- d*-t O^ 
spreads ^ 1.9^%J 

$1.98 extra heavy, full size Bed- 
spreads for tomor- ^ "t CtCk 

row %p JL • %yz^ 

$1.69 fringed cut corner Bedspreads: 
very special ^ T 5^ ^ 

$2.50 Marseilles Bedspreads; sum- 
mer weight; special d* "f QQ 
price •pAmA^O 

Special Rug and 
Curtain Sale 

50c Muslin Ruffled Curtains, tucked, 
of good quality muslin, 5^Q/* 

at, pair ...;. i&I7C^ 

$2.00 CouclT Co'vers, large size' in Ori- 
ental designs, hemmed, C^l QO 

$1.50 Fancy Muslin Curtains with 
pretty colored borders; full QQg% 
length; tomorrow per pair..Oi^V' 

$2.00 Smyrna Rugs, size 30x60 inches, 
in a variety of choice C* "f QO 
styles, at ^^•nJZW 

$1.25 Scotch Brussels Rugs, size 27x 
54 inches, a good dur- 7 ^i* 



Extraordinary 
Embroidery Values 

2^/2C 

2V2C 
5c 
5c 



10c 



19c 



5c Swiss Insertions, new 

patterns 

5c Swiss Headings, new 

patterns 

10c Swiss Insertions 

at only 

10c Cambric Insertions and 

Edgings 

121/^c Edgings and Inser- *7^*>J* 

tions, wide widths • /^^ 

15c and 17 %c Edgings and 

Insertions, sale price 

15-inch Edgings, with insertions to 
match; goods worth 19c "f 9l7lw« 

and 2214c, sale price J.^~^^ 

18-inch All-over Embroid- 
eries, 25c and 33c values. . . 
18-inch Flouncings, in nice 1 Ckf* 

new patterns •*• ^^ 

27-lnch Flouncings, scalloped and 
hemstitched edges; valuea 9^/« 

up to 45c and 50c ^%3\^ 

44-inch Founclngs worth 59c 

and 65c, sale price 

40-inch Voile Flouncings, in values 
from 75c to $1.00, sale ^Q/* 

price tomorrow %J*7\^ 

$1.25 40-lnch Voile Flouncings In a 
beautiful assortment of 7 ^t* 

patterns, sale price • %Jx* 

$1.00 44-lnch Swiss Flouncings in a 
nice assortment, sale price 

tomorrow, yard 

18-inch Corset Cover Em- "t C^g% 

broidery, 25c values A. UK* 

30c Fine Cambric Corset 

Cover Embroidery 

18-inch Swiss Corset Cover 2^/» 

Embroidery, 39c value ^%M\^ 

50c Swiss Corset Cover 
Embroidery 



3Sc 



69c 



19c 



Big Specials in 

New Millinery 

At Startling Prices 

59 Beantifally Trimmed flats sold at $2.50 
28 Beantifally Trimmed flats sold at $3.00 
31 Beaatlfully Trimmed flats sold at $3.50 



Your 
Choice 



$1.00 



40 Bo°utlful Trimmed Hats sold at $4.00 ) Choice 

63 Beautiful Trimmed Hats sold at $4.50 



66 Beautiful Trimmed Hats sold at $5.00. 



38 Handsome Trimmed Hats sold at 
45 Hand.some Trimmed Hats sold at 
35 Handsome Trimmed Hats sold at 
16 Handsome Trimmed Hat€ sold at 



$7.50. 

$8.50. 
$10.00. 
$12.00. 




H 



Incomparable Values In 
Pattern Hats 

All goods sold at $16.50, $18.00 and (g t /) 
$20— your choice at only._ _. •pXLf 



8 




many years this place has been famous 
for its water, wlilch was thouglit to 
come from one spring, but a complete 
investigation disclcaed the fact that 
there are three distinct springs. A 
large concrete ba.sln Will be constructed 
to contain a supply at all times. 



aitkin pupils' 
worm: is shown 



Display of Their Manual 

Training Made for Public 

Inspection. 

Aitkin, Minn., May 23.— (."^^pecial to 
The Herald.)— An exhibit of the ex- 
cellent work done in the manual train- 
ing and sewing departments of the 
Aitkin school was held in the lunch 
room yesterday afternoon under the 
supervision of Mr. (Juy and Miss Clark, 
teachers of those departments. The 
work was a credit to teachers and pu- 
pils and showed ca-eful training. Tea 
was served to the Aisitor.s by the girls 
of the seventh and elglith grades. 
To Preach to Ciraduaten. 

Rev. A. L. Richardson will deliver 
the baccalaureate sermon to the grad- 
uating class of the high school Sunday 
evening in the Auditorium. The vari- 
ous churches of the town will unite for 
the occasion. 

Miss Julia Bell, leacher in the local 
schools has received the appointment 
as teacher In the Porto Rico schools at 
a salary of $90 a month. 

hatchYanyTrout 
forjievils lake. 

Grand Forks, N. D., May 23. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Dean Brannon of 
the biological station of the University 
of North Dakota las had charge of 
hatching 18,000 steel hedge trout at 
the university in this city, and the 
whole number will be released soon 
In the water of D'^vils lake. This is 
the first active step taken in the stock- 
ing of the lake, rreliminary investi- 
gation having been made for the past 
two years which showed conclusively 
that fish would live in the water. 



have cottages for their members at the 
North Dakota tuberculosis sanitarium 
here. The two lodges, at meetings 
held this week appointed a joint com- 
mittee which will investigate the sit- 
uation and lay plans for the construc- 
tion of the cottage. 

JUDGE WRIGHT TO 

S PEAK AT AITKIN. 

Aitkin, Minn., May 23.— (.Special to 
The Herald.) — Memorial services will 
be held in the Methodist church Sunday 
morning and Judge Wright ot Park 
Rapids will deliver an address appro- 
priate to the occasion. The services 
will be attended by members of the 
local G. A. R., W. R. C. and Sons of 
Veterans. 



GETTYSBURG CANNON, 

Relics of Great Battle to Be Dedicated 
at Fort Rice, N. D. 

Mandan, N. D., May 23.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The effort to secure the 
presence of the widow of Gen. Custer 
at P^ort Rice in July wlien the two can- 
nons secured through Governor Hanna 
are to be dedicated, is adding a great 
deal of interest to the coming celebra- 
tion. 

The cannon were used in the Gettys- 
burg battle nearly a half century ago 
and many old soldiers as well as prom, 
inent men of tlie younger generation 
are expected to attend. 



Looking^ZveiTesln' Cravats ? 

Just notice the new Welch, Margetson & Co., London, 
Bat Wings and Foulard Four-in-Hands — the new Knitted 
Scarfs, the wide end vet small knot Imperials for the summer 
season— 50c UPWARDS. 

•^ *J5. otewert dt Co. 

304 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



a 



WILL HE|.^VALID. 

Grand Forks. N. 1)., May 23.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The will of Mrs. 
Minnie Schneider by which Frank 
Qherke was made practically the sole 
beneficiary was held valid by Judge 
L. K. Hassell yesterday in the face of 
protests by Bernard Gherke. a brother. 
He charged that undue Influence had 
been brought to bear on Mrs. Schneider 
to secure such a y.v\\\. The will pro- 
vides for the disposition of consider- 
able Grand Forks property. 

— .» ; 

CottaKea at Sanitarium. 

Dunseith, N. , D^, May 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The grand lodges of 
the A. O. U. W. and the Degree of 
Honor probably ^111 t>e the first to 



SNAKE IN BA NANAS. 

Reptile Drops Out in Lake Linden Co- 
operative Store. 

Lake Linden, Mich., May 23. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — A thirty-inch 
tropical snake that fell from a bunch 

of bananas in the local Co-operative 
store Is exhibited In a glass lar. Its 
body is of pale green hue, wltn mark- 
ings of brown so Interspersed as to 
give the back a chainlike appearance. 
A clerk was cutting bananas ' -om the 
bunch when he noticed a nest of fine 
dry grass close to the stalk. When 
the bunch was shaken the snake fell 
to the floor. It is not known whether 
the reptile is poisonous, but the store 
clerks took no chances. The snake 
was forthwitli hustled into a jar and 
promptly sealed within it. 



OFFERING SITES FOR 
CALUM ET POS TOFFICE. 

Calumet Mich.. May 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — A half dozen property 
owners in (jalumet have placed bids 
with the postoffice department, which 
advertised for bids on a site for the 
proposed new $200,000 Calumet post- 
office building. An appropriation of 
$20,000 has been made for the site for 
the block. The choice of bids by the 
government has not been announced 
as yet but a postoffice department of- 
ficial is expected here shortly to look 
the sites over. The appropriation for 



the building, now that the site ap- 
propriation has been taken care of. is 
expected at the next session of con- 
gress. 

COPPER COUNTRY 

K.OF P. GOING. 

Calumet, Mich.. May 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Close to 200 Pythians 
of Calumet, Laurium, Houghton, Han- 
cock and Chaesell and also about for- 
ty members of Korayb temple, Dra- 
rnatic Order of the Knights of Khoras- 
san. the social branuh of the Pythian 



order, will go to Marquette for the 
annual convention and third rank tour- 
nament of the Upper Peninsula league. 
Knights of Pythias, early In June. 
They will charter a special train for 
the trip. The Copper country lodges 
are helping Laurium lodge to land th« 
1914 convention. Ishpeming also seeks 
the next" convention. 



•'Dick Withlngton and His Cat,* 
three-reel feature for the children at 
the Lyceum tomorrow. 



Subscribe for Tbe Herald 



D. H.. 5-23-'l8. 



Shoes for Boys 

We do not carry the cheap but wortlile.<s stuff sold in these 
days of leatherless leather. Hides are high and a good shoe 
costs money, but then it's cheaper in the end because it lasts. 

We are sole Duluth Agents for Cogan's Elk Sole Boys* 
Scout Shoes, $2.00 and $2.50. 

Boys' and Little Men's stout School Shoes in box and 
velour calf, lace or button, $1.50 to $3.50. 

High-top Boys' Shoes, and Shoes with bellows tongues for 
wet weather, $2.50, $3.00 and $3.50. 

Boys' White Tennis Shoes, made by Goodyear Glove Rub- 
ber company, $1.35. 



Duluth, 
Minn. 



Foot-Note : Everwear 




At Third 
Ave. West. 

~CloUMnf Ca 

Hose for men, boys and children. 





wtmmiS^ 



12 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 23, 1913. 



THE DULUTB HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 

riihlUbed every evenlnR except Sun- 
dny by The Her«ld Company. 

Both Telephones— Business Office, 324; 
Editorial Rooms. 1126. 



Entered u i*oond-cl«. matter at thj. P">:«»>, -P^'" 
Offic* uude r tint >ct of congrcaa of MtrUi 3. 18. »■ 

OFFICIAL PAPER, CITY OF DULlTfl 



»ril?*t RIPTION RATKS— Py mail, pay- 

nMe in advance, •>ne month. 35 cents. 

three mv.nths. $1; six months »-. 

one vear. $4: Saturday Herald. »1 per 

year; Weekly Herald. $1 per year. 
Daily by carrier, city and suburbs. 10 

Cfhts a week. 45 cents a month. 

Ritb-.Tih,.-s wUl ronfor ft f«vor by making known 
toy C'jniplalul of wrvlc* 

TNTit-n changing tue »<1ilr«« of y-ur p»P«r. tt U 
Important to 8U» both old *ud u»>v addresaes. 

The Duluth Herald accepts adver- 
tising contracts with the distinct suar- 
Hiity that It has the largest circulation 
In Minnesota outside the Twin Cities. 



NOTHING LIKE IT ANYWHERE. 

Says the Long Prairie Leader, in 
advocating the ratification of the 
'•seven-senators" amendment to the 
Constitution: "If the state of Mis- 
souri had not adopted the principle 
of the 'seven-senators' amendment, 
that state today would be ruled by 
St. Louis. * ♦ ♦ If Minnesota 
does not follow the e.xample set by 
every state of the Union which has 
congested centers of population, the 
state will within thirty-five years be 
controlled by St. Paul, Minneapolis 
and Duluth." 

The Long Prairie Leader has suc- 
ceeded marvelously in crowding a 
maximum of misinformation into a 
minimum of space. The paragraph 
quoted contains three statements, all 
of which are correct except as fol- 
lows: 

1. Missouri has not adopted the 
"principle" of the "seven-senators" 
bill, nor is there any proposal there 
to do so. Except that the Constitti- 
tion of that state requires that every 
county, no matter what its size, shall 
have at least one member of the 
house, legislative apportionment in 
Missouri is strictly according to pop- 
ulation. 

2. The county in which the city of 
St. Louis is situated has less than 
one-quarter of the population of the 
state, so that Missouri is not ruled 
by St. Louis. Adding the county 
containing Kansas City, the two com- 
bined have something less than a 
third of the state's population. 
Though Missouri has one city of 
nearly 700,000 and another of nearly 
250,000. there is no suggestion what- 
ever in that state that the cities shall 
be discriminated against in legisla- 
tive representation. And Missouri is 
In much greater danger from St. Louis 
than Minnesota is from Minneapolis, 
St. Paul and Duluth. 

3. The statement that "every state 
in the Union which has congested 
centers of population" has set the 
example of unfair legislative repre- 
sentation is absolutely false. All but 
a handful of states base their legis- 
lative representation strictly on pop- 
ulation, as it should be. None of 
the exceptions have proposals so un- 
American and undemocratic as that 
involved in the "seven-senators" pro- 
posal. The state coming nearest it is 
New York, which simply has pro- 
vided that not inore than half the 
membership of the senate shall come 
from Greater New York, leaving it 
possible for cities of more than a 
hundred thousand population to have 
three-quarters of the senate member- 
ship, as they actually have at present. 
The fact is that those who attempt 
to justify the "seven-senators" inno- 
vation by example cannot find the 
example, and that attempts to jus- 
tify it by reason are hopelessly futile 
because it has neither reason nor 

justice. 

-0 ■ 

Those people who accused Berratt 
O'Hara In the hope of discrediting his 
vice exposures can't exactly be said 
to have accomplished their purpose. 



proportion of the time of the legisla- 
ture is consumed in listening, more or 
less patiently, to the wrangling of 
the gentlemen from Hennepin over 
measures in which nobody else has 
the slightest interest. 

For Minneapolis, at present the 
metropolis of Minnesota, has no home 
rule charter, and must rush to the 
legislature with every little thing nut 
covered by its antiquated and inade- 
quate old-style charter. The result 
is that a large proportion of the two 
thousand bills before the average ses- 
sion of the legislature is composed of 
Minneapolis measures, on each and 
every one of which the gentlemen 
from Hennepin must debate excited- 
ly, disclosing each other's real names 
and washing Minneapolis unclean 
linen in the full gaze of the wholft 

state. 

The Nolan bill for the local regu- 
lation of public utilities, about which 
there was so much fuss near the close 
of the session, is merely an aggra- 
vated instance of what is going on 
most of the time. The Nolan bill 
conferred no powers which every 
home rule charter city does not now 
enjoy, and no powers which Minne- 
apolis would not have if it would be 
progressive enough to adopt a home 
rule charter. 

The legislature has been extraor- 
dinarily patient with Minneapolis. 
But patience ceases to be a virtue 
when a city's lack of enterprise so 
wastes the time of the state's law- 
making body. 

If the people of Minneapolis will 
kindly adopt a home rule charter, thus 
putting the metropolis on a par with 
most of the minor communities of the 
state, it will clarity the legislative 
situation and simplify legislative pro- 
cesses to the benefit of the whole 
state. It is impudent for Minneapolis, 
v/hen it can easily provide itself with 
a home rule charter, to continue ask- 
ing the state to spend thousands of 
dollars turning the state legislature 
into a mangle for the washing of 
Minneapolis dirty liijen. 



though it has been, through political 
bossism and its corrupt partnership 
with privilege-seeking business— but 
by humanity. 

And unless women are something 
less than human beings, or something 
more, there is no more reason for re- 
strictions of sex in voting than for 
restrictions of property ownership. 

While the Courier-Journal would 
"save women the passion and dirt of 
party politics," The Herald would 
drive the passion and dirt out of par- 
ty politics by admitting women to 
the party councils. 

Nobody can guess how much of the 
passion and dirt of party politics is 
due to the fact that it has been re- 
stricted to men. 

It has been noted that where men 
congregate without feminine society, 
they quickly revert to semi-barbarism. 
Take a hundred of the best and 
most "refined" men in any commun- 
ity, and transplant them to a colony 
in the wilderness, without a woman 
within a hundred miles. Leave them 
for five years and then come back. 
You will find them carelessly dressed, 
slouchy, profane, quarrelsome, ill- 
behaved, rough, almost uncouth. 

Import, then, a hundred gentle and 
good women, and mark the change. 
There will be a sudden demand for 
razors and hairbrushes. There will 
be a tidying up of apparel, of speech, 
of conduct. Your hundred barbar- 
ians will return from savagery to civ- 
ilization in a twinkling. 

Why doesn't that account for the 
"passion and dirt" in politics? 

Politically speaking, men have been 
colonized in an Eveless wilderness, 
and so have reverted to barbarism. 

The thing to do, obviously, is to 
import into this political Eden the 
refining influence of good women. 



The cruelest Insinuation yet U con- 
tained In the suggestion that Dr. 
Frledmann got his turtle serum from 
one of the diamond-backed variety. 



Next Monday the Minnesota rate case 
will be decided — maybe. 



THE OPEN COURT 



HARD TO GET AROUND. 

James J. Hill makes the highly per- 
tinent comment that there would be 
no trouble about Japanese ownership 
of California lands if the Californians 
would simply refuse to sell them any. 

We don't see how the California 
jingoes can very well get around that. 

Apparently what the Californians 
want, regardless of what it does to 
the nation, is a law to restrain their 
own thirst for the profits there are 
in selling land to the Japs for higher 
prices than white people will pay. 

They seem very like alcoholics who 
vote for prohibition in the hope that 
the law will cure them of what they 
are unable to cure for themselves. 



(Reader, of Tl.e Hemld are Incited to maite free 
use of UiU column to express their Ideas about the 
toplca of general interest, but dlscuMloni of sec arlan 
rellgloua differences are barred. Lett*™ must not 
exc^l 300 words-the shorter the better They m^t 
be written on one side of the pai)er oiUy, &"d Uiey 
muat be accompanied In erery caae by the u<^o aiid 
address of the writer. U.oush Uie»e need not be pub- 
ll:(hed. A signed letter Is always more effecUve, how- 
ever. ) 

JUST SEE WHAT WILL 

HAPPEN TO DULUTH. 



The Dirge of Doubt 

^ , ; ■ 
Herbert Kaufman Hi the f'om*"'* World. 



I am Doubt, Daughter of Darkness 
Fear and cowardice and bigotry and 
prejudice I suckle at my poisoned 
breasts. 

My black wings cloak the sun ana 
hide the rainbow. 

I feed upon the hearts of men and 
drain the courage from their veins. 

When genius weaves Its tapestries 
of dreams, my vandal talons rip the 
pattern from the hopeful fabric. 

I dog the footsteps"! of ambition and 
hurl adventure from* '.he heights of 
empires. 

I break the wings of glory and l 
steal the chaplet from the brow of 
fame. 

I scrawl "impossibility" upon the 
guldeposls of success. 

I strew the highwa>8 to the stars 
with barriers of Incredulity. 

I drip my venom In the sweet wine 
of faith. 

I block the vision of the soul with 
false mirages and make horizons seem 
impenetrable walls. 

When progress urgent daring to the 
fore. I counsel discouragement. Wlien 
valor's trumpets sound the charge I 
plead the adverse chanoe and drag the 
weak-willed to the rear. 

I brewed the hemlock for illustrious 
Socrates. 

I built the cross for Christ on Cal- 
vary. 

I drove the stake for Jeanne d'Arc. 

I lit the faggots for the witches of 

Salem. ^ , . „ 

I led the mob that stoned Columbus 

and I forged the chains in which he 

died. 

Brainless, I cannot reason; there- 
fore I hate and destroy all that I do 
not comprehend. 

Where I tread, wreck and Intoler- 
ance follow. 

Tear off my mask and look well in 
my face— I AM IGNOF ANCE. 

Learning Is my hereditary foe. I 
perish before the lami? of knowledge. 
Year by year I retreat Into the 
West. My sun has set. My hour 
wanes. Civilization l«i hard upon my 
flanks. . „ 

The printed word, ihe wired voice, 
the talking disc, the lightning lamp, 
the dynamo, the mlcra.scope, the ship 
of the winds, the heiling knife, are 
my conquerors. 

As I flee, humanity and Justice blos- 
som behind me and millennium de- 
scends the Hills of Dawn. 

Golden Ages are tj-lckllng In tue 
sands of time— men have begun to be- 
lieve in Man. 

God's voice is heard above the bab- 
ble of chicanery, the sophistry of pur- 
blind creeds, the bitte).- preachments or 

the cruel. __ , 

There Is no reverence of the Maker 
greater than confidence in his clay. 
Doubt must die when men boldly use 
their minds. 



Statesmen, Real and Near 



Br Fred 0. Keilf. 



I The State Legislature 




Just the same, his friends must wish 
that King Alfonso didn't look so much 
like the Chocolate Soldier. 



THE STATE WILL BE GRATEFUL. 

Minneapolis is struggling with the 
formation of a city charter. In order 
to comply with the legal requirement 
that a charter commission must sub- 
mit a charter within six months of 
its appointment, all the members of 
the Minneapolis charter commission 
hav^ resigned, and have asked the 
district court to reappoint them. If 
the court accedes, the prospects are 
that the commission will submit a 
new charter, drawn along the lines 
of the commission plan, to the city 
council. And the city council must 
submit it to the voters. 

The state at large, particularly that 
part of it which knows anything 
about legislative processes, will 
heave a sigh of relief if Minneapolis 
adopts a home rule charter. 

Nobody who has looked through 
the laws enacted at the recent ses- 
sion of the legislature has failed to 
be impressed, and perhaps somewhat 
mystified, by the large proportion of 
laws applying only to Minneapolis. 
But the session laws do not tell the 
whole story. 

They do not disclose the fact that 
where one Minneapolis law was 
enacted, perhaps a dozen bills were 
introduced, to be defeated or to have 
others substituted for them. They 
do not disclose the fact that the Min- 
neapolis delegation is .perpetually in 
disagreement, and that a formidable 



TARIFF CONSISTENCT. 

Manufacturers who induced the 
government to give them tariff sub- 
sidies on the plea of benefits to labor 
now protest against any government 
action to protect labor from having 
its benefits unfairly taken away from 
them. 

Evidently their view of it is that 
it is fair for the government to tax 
all the people for their benefit, trust- 
ing to their generosity to give labor 
its share, but it is unfair for the gov- 
ernment to insist that labor shall not 
be unjustly deprived. 

They hold it fair enough for the 
government to give them inordinate 
profits through tariff subsidies, but 
unfair, when these subsidies are re- 
duced to reasonable figures, to take 
precautions against unjust reprisals 
upon innocent workers. 

Do they realize that they are awak- 
ing a suspicion that perhaps labor 
has not been getting quite all of the 
benefits of the tariff subsidy all these 
years? 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

In an Item in your paper of May 20, 
I read "Superior Should Help Duluth.' 
Let me ask In all fairness "Why Should 
she either in a vice crusade or other- 
wise?" You never miss a chance to 
throw It Into Superior every chance 
vou get. If an elevator or other in- 
dustry is to be established in Superior 
you come out In big head lines, '"Twin 
Ports" as per the agreement at the 
time it was decided to call the two 
towns such, but If these are to be built 
on your side of the bay its Duluth in 

capital letters. Agreement be d . 

Now when you are at sea In an old 
tub without a paddle you yell for Su- 
perior's help to get you to shore by 
helping flght this so-called vice and 
to help grass grow in main streets. 

If such should come to pass that the 
two towns should abolish the districts 
what would your hordes of men work- 
ing on railroads, steel plant, dock, etc. 
do? They would simply go from door 
to door butting Into every house where 
a furnished room sign was displayed. 
Your towns would be filled with small 
confectionery stores, "living rooms at- 
tached" for ever since Eve tempted 
Adam with an apple this traffic has 
been carried on and always will be If 
not openly, on the quiet, and If on the 
quiet It means more policemen and 
more expense. I am a man of family, 
have traveled a grood deal, been In 
towns where the districts are. also 
where they are not. and it is my ex- 
perience that cities with the district 
are the best governed; also you are 
not button-holed every block by some 
street walker. 

Superior Is profiting by Duluth's 
move In abolishing the district, so 
again I say, why should she help you? 
Even In the short time you've been at 
it now your streets are loaded with 
street walkers winking and nodding at 
all passersby. I have as much re- 
spectability as any man and I'll say 
and every fair-minded man will agree 
with me, that in abolishing the segre- 
gated districts you only throw It up 
town or on street, so why not let them 
run. 

If I was mayor of a city I'd close 
every chop suey restaurant In town as 
more girls are ruined in such places 
than in sporting houses or from their 
influences, so aren't you commencing 
at the wrong end to clean your city. 

Keep up your so-called cleaning 
process and the Superior people will 
come over In two years and get their 
winter's crop of hay off of your streets. 
Yours truly. A. D. GRIGNQN. 

Pitt. Minn., May 21. 



Face His Misfortune 

Paris Letter to the London Tele- 
graph: Emlle Angaln has no luck; 
his face has been his misfortune. Not 
that there is anythln,? singular about 
his appearance. There Is not, hence 
these tears. In 1903 Emille was arrest- 
ed as the accomplice, of a notorious 
anarchist. Jacob, in a crime at An- 
gora. He spent Ave months In prison 
awaiting trial. Facec by witnesses of 
the crime, he was formally and most 
circumstantially reccgnized by nine 
worthy people whose bona fldes were 
above suspicion, and by four Inspectors 

of police. , .. 41, 

Things looked very black for the 
accused when, as the trial drew to its 
close he put to the iudge this simple 
question: "On what day, as you say. 
the crime was committed?" The Judge 
gave the date. "If you Inquire at the 
Sante prison." said A.ngain, "I think 
you will find that on the day of the 
crime I was serving a sentence there." 
The alibi was found to be correct. It 
had been a cJLse of mistaken Identity. 
Recently Angaln made another ap- 
pearance In the doch:, on a charge of 
swindling. The swindles, all of the 
same nature, covered a period of six 
months, from January to August last 
year. The victims formally Identified 
Angaln. Once more the accused had an 
alibi ready. On all except one of the 
dates recorded he had been at his old 
address In the Sant« prison. In fact, 
as his counsel, M. Gavatilt, a dramatist 
by avocation, polnte* out. though 
Angaln had sp^t the greater 
portion of recent years in prison, he 
had never once been condemned. On 
three occasions the case against him 
had been dismissed *i.fter he had spent 
three years to five ftionths in prison 
awaiting trial, and twice a year of 
Imprisonment had been followed by 
acquittal. 

Counsel for the prosecution was so 
Impresesd by this tritgic rubric that he 
forgot to accuse, and was constrained 
to acknowledge that; "on the prisoner 
there weighed a fatality worthy of the 
ancients, or" — this with a bow to M. 
Gavault — of "the mcdern theater." In 
spite of this amiable collusion between 
defender and prosecutor, the Judge, on 
the principle that there is no smoke 
without fire, senten^jed Angaln to six 
months' imprisonment for the crime 
committed on the sole date for which 
the accused could not establish his cus- 
tomary alibi. With a curious muddle 
headed irony, the Jury Justified their 
verdict on the ground that Angaln was 
an old offender. 



Now that the popcorn wagons are 
making their rounds it will Just have 
to warm up. 



WOMEN AND THE BALLOT. 

Says Col. Henry Watterson in the 
Louisville Courier-Journal: "The 
Courier-Journal is in favor of giving 
the ballot to the feminine property- 
holder — not because she is a woman 
but because she is a taxpayer— and 
likewise it would admit women to 
suffrage in matters relating to schools 
and charities and corrections. It 
would save women the passion and 
dirt of party politics. Aluady 
myriads of men save themselves by 
not going to the polls." 

Fairly said, and not discourteous. 
But The Herald would not only go 
this far. but somewhat farther. 

The Herald is in favor of giving the 
ballot to women. It sees no reason 
why it should be restricted to prop- 
erty-owning women, any more than 
men lacking property should be de- 
prived of the ballot; any more than 
men having a certain amount of 
property should have one vote and 
men having twice that much should 
have two votes, and so on. For this 
is not a government by property — 



rnefnl 'Lisa Jane. 

Youth's Companion: Evidently 'Liza 
Jane was a very useful person. She 
and the old woman came Into a Lon- 
don shop and the old woman began 
examining some pieces of cheap calico. 



Washington, May 2-3. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — The agriculture department 
has prepared a lovely little pamphlet 
containing colored pictures of fifty 
prominent birds of the field and or- 
chard, In native costume. Copies of this 
little pamphlet are at the disposal of 
congressmen to send out among their 
constituents with a view to Increasing 
the knowledge of birds among the 
home folk, so that it a man steps out 
into his back yard and sees a tlirush, 
or a linnet, or a flamingo flitting about 
the trees, he will be able to call it by 
name. 

Representative Ira C. Copeley caused 
to be published In newspapers of his 
district a general proclamation to the 
effect that, while the supply lasted, 
he would Bend the pretty little bird 
books to all who would write for them, 
without money and without price. 

One constituent read the notice hast- 
ily and thus became the victim of a 
slight misunderstanding. He sat down 
and wrote his congressman as fol- 
lows: 

"I have seen your advertisement 
about free birds and I think I will 
choose a parrot. Or send a crow." 
• • • 
Representative Carter Glass of Vir- 
ginia, chairman of the house committee 
that win draft the new currency bill, 
is a man who rarely goes to bed before 
1 or 2 o'clock in the morning. This is 
not because he has to sit up pondering 
over our banking and currency system, 
nor yet because he is a professional 
ni&ht prowler, but is due to his early 
life around a newspaper office. 

Glass was obliged to quit school at 
13 and go to work as printer's devil 
on the new.spaper down at Lynchburg 
that he now owns. It was a morning 
paper and he worked at night. When he 
got into the various other Jobs on his 
way up — typesetter, reporter, and what 
not — he still toiled while others slept. 
Even after he became owner of the 
paper, he continued to be around the 
office far into the night. Thus the 
habit became permanent. For the life 
of him. Glass cannot get sleepy for an 
hour or two after midnight. So he sits 
up and meditates. Whatever kind of a 
currency bill is drafted by Glass ajid 
his committee, one may know that it 
was incubated from the etill watches 
of the night. 

When Glass was running for con- 
gress one fall, there was a certain 
statement that It was highly essential 
to get printed in time for the early 
mall edition one morning. It was a 
long statement and was not received 
until nearly press time. To make mat- 
ters worse, they were running short 
handed that night. 

"I'm afraid we can't make it," said 
the foreman to Glass w^ho had dropped 
into the composing room. "If we Just 
had one more man on the Job — " 

"I'll get you a man," said Glass. And 
he took off his coat. For the first time 
In fifteen years he set type and made 
himself generally useful. In that way 
they caught the first edition. 
• • • 
Glass got it Into his head a few years 
ago that he desired to raise fine dairy 
cattle. So he went and bought himself 
a farm and dotted the landscape with 
lowing klne of the Jersey variety. He 
kept books on them, and every cow had 
to make good. That Is. If the cost of 
the food she ate was greater than the 
butter fat she delivered, a cow found 
herself Iti a bad way. Glass would go 
over the expert testimony, giving the 
cow a fair and Impartial hearing, and 
if she couldn't prove an alibi, she was 
sentenced to the butcher. By that sys- 
tem Glass developed a wonderfully con- 
scientious and painstaking herd of 
milch cows. Things were Just going 
nicely when the Southern railroad came 
along and needed a large strip of land 
right through the Glass farm. Rather 
than be an obstacle to progress. Glass 
sold the farm to the railroad and auc- 
tioned off his cattle. And that was the 
end of his farming operations. But 
there is more to our story. 

In his primary campaign for congress 
laat year Glass' opponent posed as a 
great friend of the farmer, and made 
capital of the fact that he himself 
owned a farm. Glass no longer had a 
farm, but he was not to be outdone at 
pulling the farmer vote. So he is- 
sued a challenge to his opponent. 

"We'll go to any dairy farm you se- 
lect," said Glass, "and if I don't milk 
more cows than you do in the course of 
an hour, I'll withdraw from the race. 
If I win then you withdraw." 

But his opponent refused to accept 
the challenge. 

"How many cows can you milk per 
hour?" inquired a friend of Glass. 

"How do I know 'till I try?" replied 
Glass. "I never milked a cow in my 

life." 

Glass has a son. Carter Glass, Jr.. 
who Is a fleet runner. On the same day 
that Glass senior was defeated for the 
senate two years ago. young Glass won 
a gold medal in a 400-yard dash at a 
college track meet. 

Young Glass mailed the medal to his 
dad with a note that said: 

"You'd better wear this for a watch 
charm to show people that somebody 
in the family can run If you can't." 

* m • 
Glass does not drink, smoke, or chew 

tobacco. He doesn't swear, either. 
When completely exasperated, however, 
he loses all control of his tongue and 
resorts invariably to the expression: 

"Dad bum It." 

• • * 
Secretary Houston reads Mark Twain 

nearly every night. Next to Mark 
Twain he llkea to read biographies of 
men who have achieved distinction - 



PiCM Vlswt on tb* Semloo. 



SwallowtnK MHHona. 

Hinckley Enterprise: "Some or the 
country papers are complaining about 
tlie increased tax rate adopted by the 
legislature. These same papers last 
fall were clamoring for the approval by 
the people of the 1-mlll road tax — 
Mora Times , _ 

Yes. And most of them wefe clam- 
oring for the adoption of the 6 per 
cent gross earnings tax that makes the 
railroads pay ?1.600.000 more Into the 
state treasury and should reduce the 
tax rate about the amount the l-mlll 
road would Increase It. But the extra 
million and a half paid by the rail- 
roads was swallowed up In so-caliea 
reform measures and an Increase made 
In the tax rate double that made by the 
road tax. And that's going some. 



Twenty Years Ago 



From Tlie Herald of this a«t«, HH. 



♦••A passenger train from Winnipeg 
and a freight collided on the North- 
ern Pacific near Little Falls, Minn., 
about 3:30 this morning. No one was 
killed but several were Injured, one 
being the postal clerk, Wells Louna- 
berry, formerly of Duluth, who Is a 
son of Col, C. A. Lounsberry of Fargo. 



What Are Yoa AKatastf 

Life: This Is the era of the anti. 
A man's fame In the world depends 
upon the number of th'ngs he doesn't 
like, won't eat and refuses to believe. 
Positive traits have become negative 
virtues. "What does he want?" we 
used to ask about the newcomer. "What 
doesn't he want?" Is the proper ques- 
tion today. Politicians make good by 
making the worst of everything. Vege- 
tarians do not make themselves happy 
by eating vegetables. They make 
themselves miserable by assailing roast 
beef. Does the man who loves and Is 
loved by his wife spend his spare time 
thanking God? Not at all. He spends 
time he cannot spare organizing antl- 
dlvoroe societies. A modern man Is 
one who neglects what he does like and 
can have in order to denounce or pur- 
sue the things he dLslikes and can't 

have. 

♦— 

She 'Warn the Kitchen Lady. 

Answers, London: "I want somebody 
to show me where to unload this coal." 
said the grimy looking man at the 
kitchen door. 

"Well, you needn't ask me." repl'ed 
the young woman thus addressed, as 
she tossed her head scornfully. "I'm 
the kitchen lady." 

"Indeed!" was the retort. "And I'm 
the coal gentleman, the father of three 
kitchen ladles, one laundry lady, one 
charlady, and if you don't show me 
where to put this coal, I'll call the 
woman of the house." 

This was altogether too much for the 
haughty cook. 

"I'll show you, sir," she ventured 
humbly, then meekly led the way to the 
I coal cellar. 



then that, wetting it and rubbing It 
with her fingers, to try If the colors 
were fast. 

But she seemed not entirely satis- 
fied. At last she cut off a piece with 
a pair of scissors, and handed it to 
'Liza Jane. 

"Here, 'Liza Jane." she said, "you 
chew that, and see If it runs." 

And 'Liza Jane ralseiJL it to her mouth 
and solemnly went to work. 



In 



examuiiiiB ouiuc i^.tt, ,ro ui ,..1^0.^, ..c».ii.v^. u.»r,i »T..^ "- ^r.unna In other 

She pulled at one piece first this way. the arts, sciences, or politics, in omer 



of 



Cupld'a S^vlft Dart. 

Judge: When a certain darky 
Mobile, Ala., annoinced his engage- 
ment to the dusky one of his choice 
the congratulationfi that were show- 
ered upon him Included a note of won- 

dor 

"Joe" said one of these friends. "I 
shore ' is surprised! We-all never 
thought you'd speak up. It's going on 
two years since you beg-un to fool 
around Miss Violet" ,.^ , , , . 

"Dat's true." said Joe; "but de fact 
is, old man. I didn't lose my Job until 
last night." 



!'co"rrL'i.t!T91 3. by BVed C. Kelly. All r lthts reeerred.) 

«How Did You Dler* 

Did you tackle the trouble that came 

your way, 
With a resolute heart and cheerful. 
Or hide your face from the light of 

With a craven soul and fearful? 

Oh, a trouble's a ton, or a trouble's an 

ounce, 
Or a trouble Is what you make it. 
And it isn't the fact that you're hurt 

that counts, 
But only, how did you take it? 



Yea, Wikx NotT 

Collier's: It Is announced that wres- 
tling Is pointing toward an early and 
popular revival. 

Why not? OutslAe 6t the fact that 
nine-tenths of it is a frame-up and 
three-fifths of the residue la soggy and 
stale. It's one of our greatest and 
cleanest Uttle sports. 

. — «» — 

Her <T»ole*. 

Life: Mother: Now, Mabel dear, 
would you sooner stay at home with 
me or go for a walk with auntie? 

Mabel: I'd soonax go for a walk with 
I you. u ' — 



You 



are beaten to earth, well, well, 

what's that? 
Come up with a smiling face. 
It's nothing against you to fall down 

flat, 
B<it to lie there, that's the disgrace. 
The harder you're thrown, why the 

harder your bounce; 
Be proud of your blackened eye; 
It Isn't the fact that you won that 

counts. 
But how did you flght, and why? 



Will Fall Again. 

Warren Register: A few of the 
Southern Minnesota papers are whoop- 
ing it up for the "Seven Senators 
abortion. The "seven senators" pro- 
posed amendment ought not to carry 
and we believe it will fail next year as 
it did last year. It Is a demagogic ap- 
peal to country prejudice against the 
big cities and its fathers should be 
ashamed of their offspring. Wo be- 
lieve It will fall, because we have an 
abiding faith In the fairness and love 
of Justice and a square deal of the 
country voter. 

Self-Impoaed Taxea. 

St Peter Free Press: Twenty years 
ago thousands in appropriations would 
suffice. Today nothing but millions 
will do, and the people are burdened 
with high taxes.— Anoka Union. 

All of which is true. But we should 
alwavs bear in mind that these bur- 
densome taxes are self-imposed. No 
taxes can be levied unless duly author- 
ized by law. And who is responsible 
for that law? The very parties that 
pay the taxes. If the taxpayer objects 
to high taxes he should send men to the 
legislature in favor of low taxes. It is 
the only way to effect a change and 
yet it is habitually overlooked during 
political campaigns 

Looking; Ahead. 

Speaker Rines. in Mora Times: It is 
costing the state too much to run Its 
affair^ There are too many state de- 
partments and too many employes for 
the amount of work to be done. The 
work of the state could be performed 
more effectively, and, of coourse, more 
economically, if several of our coni- 
misslons and departments were consol- 
idated and the number of officials and 
employes correspondingly reduced. 
Many members of the state legislature 
saw the necessity for a re-organlzation 
and a correlation of our state depart- 
ments. In the house a movement was 
started with that end In view. One of 
the house committees devoted nearly 
its entire time to the question. The 
subject being too big to work and the 
limited time allotted to a legislative 
session, a bill was passed In the house 
providing for an interim committee of 
senators and house members to study 
the question during the next two years 
and make its recommendations to the 
1915 session of the legislature Unfor- 
tunately those who would have been 
affected by a re-organization of state 
departments and a more economical ad- 
ministration of our governmental af- 
fairs were strong enough to prevent Its 
passage in the senate, thereby delaying 
further action until the 1915 session, 
unless the question is taken up at the 
extra session. The consolidation of 
state departments will be an Issue In 
this state in the next campaign and 
we look to see something done upon 
this subject at the next session of the 
leglslatur«. 

Will Xot Down. 

Menahga Joournal: The recent mug- 
wump legislature may think they have 
put the Republican party out of busi- 
ness, but they "sure" have another 
guess coming. 

UnoonTlneed. 

Roseau Region: An extra session of 
the legislature has been proposed for 
the purpose of creating a state public 
utilities commission. Until more con- 
vincing arguments are put forth than 
what have thus far been advanced on 
the subject, the Region Is inclined to 
the opinion that local control In these 
matters is a safer thing for the people 
and municipalities affected than state 
regulation. The corporations con- 
cerned seem to prefer the latter. 

J«at a Few. 

Chlsholm Tribune-Herald: The leg- 
islature Just adjourned has the record 
for the amount of new bills passed and 
much needed laws were among them. 
There were a few presented, however, 
that failed of passage. 

— ♦ ■ 

KlaalnK Day In a Vllla«e. 

London Telegraph: Hungerford Lit- 
tle town, situated on the confines of 
Berkshire and Wiltshire, was recently 
the scene of incidents reminiscent of 
the remote past. It was Hockncy day, 
a day when Hungerford slips back Into 
past centuries and revels in customs 
and privileges granted by John of 
Gaunt. One feature of the proceedings 
is the perambulation of the town by 
two Tuttlmen. represented on this oc- 
casion by F. Barnard and J. S. Tyler, 
whose interesting mission it la to kiss 
all women folk and exact headpence 
from men. Nor is the custom honored 
only in the breach, with the result that 
the Tuttlmen had a busy day. In ex- 
change for kisses they give oranges. 

Particularly busy were the Tuttlmen 
at the workhouse, where they found 
the women folk Insistent on the due 
observance of their privilege. The 
Tuttlmen spent an hour at this Insti- 
tution. Another Interesting scene oc- 
curred at the laundry, where the f om- 
en employes, their hair gaily decked 
with primroses, paraded before the 
kissing men. who, by special r^liarter. 
were instructed to be discreet la their 
choice, and selected two each as the 
recipients of their salute. 

While the Tuttlmen were engaged in 
this mission the borough dignitaries 
were assembled in solemn conclave at 
the courthouse, whither they had been 
summoned In the early morning by 
blasts on John of Gaunfs historic horn. 
The ancient rules, regulations and 
privileges were recited with due so- 
lemnity. 

The labors of the deliberative assem- 
bly being at an end, the members of 
the Jury adjourned for the Hocktide 
luncheon, while pence and oranges 
were thrown from the window to the 
crowd of children who were granted a 
holiday in honor of the event When 
the company separated the Tuttlmen 
continued their mission. 



•••The West Duluth council last 
night passed an ordinance permitting 
the Minnesota Canal company to lay its 
mains In the village. An expenditure 
of $100,000 by the company within a 
year Is provided for. The company 
agrees to furnish water for fire pro- 
tection at 2 cents per 1.000 gallons, as 
against a charge of 20 cents now made 
by the water company. P. K. McDon- 
nell was awarded the contract for im- 
proving Ninth street, Hazelwood, for 
17,981. The appointment of C. L. Frt-d- 
rickson as street inspector was con- 
firmed. 



•••Miss Lura McLeod will leave on 
the steamer Monarch tomorrow for her 
home at Owen Sound, Ont., where she 
will visit for two months. 



•••Miss Mabel Paddock has returned 
from Houston, Tex., where she has been 
spending the winter. 

•••Black & Dodge of I^anslng, Mich., 
submitted an ordinance for a telephone 
franchise at the meeting of the city 
council last evening and said tliey were 
ready to test In the courts any claim 
by tlie Duluth Telephone company that 
It had an exclusive franchise. The 
council voted an appropriation of $250 
per month for four months for concerts 
by the City band. The appointments of 
Berlah Magoffin as railroad commis- 
sioner and Robert H. Doran as deputy 
assessor were confirmed. 



••♦John Edward Jones, 20 yearn of 
age. was killed this morning at the 
sawmill of Duncan & Brewer by his 
clothing catching on a revolving shaft 
around which he was whirled. He was 
unmarried. A brother. Charles H. 
Jones, and a brother-in-law. U. S. 
Rldgeway,, work in the same mill, and 
his parents reside at Madison, S D. 



•••The Duluth baseball team was or- 
ganized last night with the following 
nfficers: President, J. Lynn; secretary, 
and treasurer, Ed Krelwltz; manager, 
J. Reld; captain, B. B. Fitger. 



••♦The big steel steamer Selwyn 
Eddy has broken the wheat cargo rec- 
ord of Lake Superior by going out of 
here today on a mean draught of 14 
feet, 4 Inches, with 115,000 bushels of 
wheat on board. She Is commanded by 
Capt. Harry Zealand. 



Booka and Boya. 

Lee Shippey In the Hlgglnsvllle. Mo., 
Jeffersonian: Do you remember the 
first time you read Robert Louis 
Stevenson's "Treasure Island," or 
Alexander Dumas' "Three Musket- 
eers?" Of course, you do. Those were 
the books which gave you a taste for 
reading. You used to think books 
were dull things. Just as that boy of 
yours does now. You would lots rath- 
er spend your evenings with "the 
gang." listening to .the older boys tell- 
ing whoppers about their thrilling ex- 
periences, and sometimes some pretty 
bad stories, than stay home and read. 
Books seemed schoollsh things and you 
got enough of school while you had 
to stay in It. But when you read 
those two books you learned that books 
could be fascinating, and you wanted 
to read more. 

The fates must have ordered the In- 
spiration of those books for the pur- 
pose of making boys love reading. And 
from the time you read them your 
broader mental development dates — 
you began to take more interest in 
history and great achievements, and 
every hero j'ou read about filled you 
with new and higher ambitions. 

It will be Just the same with your 
boy. His mental development largely 
depends on the amount and kind of 
reading he does. So make sure that he 
gets a public library card, and see to 
it he gets started reading the right 
kind of books. If you do that you 
won't have much trouble keeping him 
off the streets. 



Everx Little Couata. 

Washington Star: Senator Bourne 
said recently In "Washington: 

"The parcel post, limited as it Is 
thus far, saved the American people 
$500,000 In its first fifteen days of op- 
eration. That isn't much — not much 
to what It will do later on — but every 
Uttle counts. 

"Every little counts. In parcel post- 
age as In New York flats." the senator 
continued, smiling. "I know a New 
York man, who. on his return from 
the roominess of Washington, said, 
fretfully ,to his servant: 

'•'Jameson, this flat seems much 
smaller than when I moved Into it last 
summer.' 

" 'Yes. air,' Jameson answered; 
'quite so, sir. But you must remem- 
ber, sir, that you are wearing your 
winter underclothing now, sir.' " 



And though you be done to the death. 

what then? 
If you battled the best you could. 
If you play your part In the world 

of men, 
Why the critic will call it good. 
Death comes with a crawl, or comes 

with a pounce. 
And whether he's slow or spry. 
It Isn't the fact that you're dead that 

counts. 
But only. "How Did You Dler 

— Edmund Vance Cooks. 



She \%'^aa the KItehen Ladr- 

London Answers: "I want some- 
body to show me where to unload this 
coal," said' the grimy-looking man at 
the kitchen door. 

"Well, you needn't ask me," replied 
the young woman thus addressed, as 
she tossed her head scornfully. "I'm 
the kitchen lady." 

"Indeed!" was the retort. "And I'm 
the coal gentleman, the father of 
three kitchen ladles, one laundry lady, 
one charlady, and if you don't show 
me where to put this coal I'll call the 
woman of the house." 

This was altogether too much for 
the haughty cook. 

"I'll show you. sir," she ventured 
humbly, then meekly led the way to 
the coal cellar. 

AMUSEMENTS. 



Sooner or Later. 

Kansas City Times: "Yes. sir, I'd 
been drinking a little — " Yoti are right. 
It was in police court. "Drinking a 
little" — or much — 'gets most of them 
there. 



Like Baaeball. 

Life: The President (during the war 
of 2012): But where are all the of- 
ficers of our army? 

The Private: Please, sir, everybody 
above the rank of private Is covering 
the battls for the New York papers. 



LYCEUIVI I TODAY 



Contlnaoua — 1 to 5, 7 to 11 p. m. 

KIMEMACOLOR 

And De Luxe Picturea. 

iv/^f\ A W ''Feather Top" 

I VU#% ■ ''Afternoon Drenaea** 

Tomorrow Children's Day. 

Matlne*^ — lOct Xlnhta — 10o-20c. 



BLANC'IU: 



MONDAY, MAY 26, l]Al% 

— la — 

"The IPI'ltneaa for the Defenae" 

Prloea — 50c tj>_ta^ J^^9*-3J^y^ aelllng. 



"WHERE YOUR MONEY 00E8 ITS DUTY." 

Asaia Todar 
and Saturday. 



EMPRESS 



RAYMOND PAINE AND A BUNCH 
OF PRKTTY G1RL.S IN 



MATINEB 
2t30 



lOc- 



'THE GIRL 
QUESTION" 

Pan and Mualr. 
NlBlita— J7i40 and OtItV. 



I 

I 



1 



"'T-'— - 



•tm^tmfm'^m 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 23, 1913. 



18 





JUST TEST OUR 
BEHER SHOES! 



2z: 



•ow ■>»' . .■w;>L'.i'M-;«?r-tj'<.-^-j".'l-Jg« 





ARTICULARLY i^ood quality in shoes, in 
the comfort of correct fit, and an unrestrict- 
ed guarantee of satisfaction — these are some 

of the things you can always be sure of at this 

I louse of "Better Shoes." 

But there's more to it. than that. Distinctive 
style, perfection in model, workmanship, advance 
ideas from the shoe style centers, and an unequaled 
shoe service at your command, ready to carry out 
the highest idea in selling good shoes; these are im- 
portant facts for you to consider. 

COME SEE THE NEW SHOES, 
PUMPS AND OXFORDS 



IE 
$3, $3.50, $4 to $5 1 $2.50, $3, $3.50, $5 

¥m iiYS MB ®mLS 
$1.00, $1.50, $2.00 to $3.00 

(According to Size.) 



^^Gitche Gamee^' Shoes for Men 
$4.00, $4.50 and $5.00 




WIELAND SHOE CO 

222 WEST FIRST STREET 



SITE WANTED 
FOR_ARMORY 

Steps Being Taken to Ob- 
tain State Aid for New 
Building. 



Duluth Companies Entitled 
to $75,000 From Legis- 
lative Appropriation. 



The site for the new armorj' is ex- 
pected to be selected within the next 
few days, according to Col. F. E. 
Resche of the local militia. It will be 
built with the aid of a $75,000 appro- 
priation made by the last legislature, 
which passed a law makiing $15,000 
available to each company of the state 
militia for the purpose of building: an 
armory. There are five companies in 
Duluth. 

Col. Resche has plans in his posses- 
sion which siiow the dimensions of 
the proposed armory to be 200 by 150 
feet with three .stories and basement. 
It will be thoroughly equipped with 



everything that Is necessary for a mili- 
tary headquarters. 

"The present building is entirely in- 
adequate" said Col. Resche yesterday, 
"and at this time a large part of our 
equipment is being kept in St. Paul 
because we haven't room for it here. 
At_ the last session of the legislature 
Jlo.OOO was appropriated to each or- 
ganization of the state militia toward 
building an armory. The five compan- 
ies here would realize from the state 
|7t),000. At a meeting of the state arm- 
ory board in St. Paul two weeks ago, 
applications for the funds allowed un- 
der the law were made by twenty- 
two organizations of the state, St. 
Paul and Minneapolis already have 
handsome armories built by each city 
floating bonds for $150,000 and $200 - 
000 respectively. 

"The law requires us to provide a 
site which must be deeded to the state 
and requires $1,000 depo8it«a by each 
organization before we can acquire the 
appropriation from the state. We 
haven't definitely decided on a loca- 
tion yet. but expect to make final ar- 
rangements for one in a abort time, 
riien we will get to work and raise the 
money necessary, which will be $1,000 
from each organization. We expect 
the city to help us In this respect. 
When this is done Duluth will be as- 
sured of the handsomest armory that 
the money we will have to spend can 
buy." 



IVo Constitutional Convention. 

Madison. Wis.. May 23. — The assem- 
bly last night defeated an effort to 
submit to the people the question of 
holding a convention to revise the state 
Constitution. The resolution to this 
end was adopted a few days ago, but 
the vote was reconsidered last night 
and the resolution Indefinitely post- 
poned by a heavy vote. 

The assembly killed a senate bill to 
merge the office of state fire marshal, 
now held by Thomas M. Purtell, with 
the state fire Insurance department. 



Why is the soda cracker today 
such a universal food? 

People ate soda crackers in the 
old days, it is true — but they 
bought them from a barrel or 
box and took them home in a 
paper bag, their crispness and 
flavor all gone. 

Uneeda Bisctiit— soda crackers 
better than any ever made before 
— made in the greatest bakeries 
in the world— baked to perfection 
— packed to perfection — kept to 
perfection until you take them, 
oven-fresh and crisp, from their 
protecting package. Five cents. 

b4ATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY 



WEST END 



H« 



HERALD BRAlVCHi 
Olson* ManmvMV 1828 W««t Snp«H<»v Street. 



COMMERCIAL CLUB WILL 
TAKE HAND IN PAVING WAR 



The Twenty-third avenue paving 
row will be taken up this evening at 
the meeting of the West End Commer- 
cial club. The subject will be In- 
troduced by Dr. O. A. Oredson, Jack 
I^lvers and a number of other prop- 
erty owners on the street. 

In speaking of the paving cpntract 
yesterday Jack Rivers said: 

"With reference to the list of names 
published In the Herald yesterday I 
win state that I know of additional 
parties who prefer sandstone to any- 
thing else on the avenue, but who are 
not Included In the list. I have not 
talked over or made It a point to go 
into this matter thoroughly and these 
two names occurred to me In a casual 
way. being Mr. and Mrs. Christian, 
owners of the Christian block on the 
corner of Superior street and Twenty- 
tliird avenue west, as well as Mr. Carl- 
son, who lives on Twenty-third avenue 
west between ^jighth and Ninth street. 

'*There really is no reason for put- 
ting In crushed rock above Fifth 
street. It does not appeal to me as to 
whether It Is a question or opinion of 
even the property owners. If the grade 
is right for sandstone, which It Is, 
sandstone should be used. The com- 
missioners appear to be afraid that 
they are going to hurt some one's feel- 
ing. Why do they not do the same as 
done In Detroit, Mich., Minneapolis, 
Minn., and other cities. These cities 
Improve streets according to the Idea 
of the city officials and if certain 
streets have a grade that will stand 
sandstone or other serviceable paving, 
such paving Is put In and then the 
property owners are assessed their 
proper proportion. Another thing that 
appears strange to me is that the com- 
mission should go to work and let a 
contract for the paving of Twenty- 
third avenue, north of Fifth street, 
with crushed rock in view of the fact 
that they did not know the exact num- 
ber of people north of Fifth street 
that wanted crushed rock, and also 



that they did know and wore In pos- 
session of a list who wanted sand- 
stone. 

"It was my understanding that the 
city Is endeavorli g to standardize pav- 
ing and it has been the policy of the 
old council that when a street was to 
be Improved, even though there 
was a serious o >jection to sandstone 
by some of the residents having prop- 
erty abutting street to be improved 
and that a few desired sandstone or 
some other serviceable pavement, the 
latter pavement was used with a view 
of standardizing the paving and elim- 
inating work necessary for repairs 
from year to year. 

"We all know that crushed rock on 
Twenty-third avt-nue will not do, as 
It win simply wash down the street 
the same as Is being done on Pied- 
mont avenue and all of the rest of 
the hillside avenues and I will say now 
that I have today served notice on the 
commission that If Twenty-third ave- 
nue Is paved with crushed rock north 
of Fifth street "hat I will pay my 
assessment under protest, as I do not 
feel that I can pay for crushed rock 
and In a few years be called upon to 
pay for sandstoie. There will cer- 
tainly be a pronounced demand for 
the sandstone bj even those now In 
favor of gravel and crushed rock In- 
side of a few years. Crushed rock 
win not hold on a level street, even 
when It Is bound with tar. 

"A statement appeared In one of the 
papers recently -vhlch was very mis- 
leading, showing that It cost $319.69 
for the first fifty feet and $177 for the 
second fifty feet for sandstone. This 
matter has been gone Into and It has 
been found that lor a 35-foot frontage 
sandstone will cost $124.32 and the 
gravel and crushed rock will probably 
cost In the neighborhood of between 
$80 to $100, putting the sandstone at 
an outside figure, say $135 or $140, it 
seems a good Investment to me and if 
the people who aie now objecting most 
strenuously cannct see their way clear 
to pay this amount some way can no 
doubt be devised by us to help them 
out." 



CHILDREN TO GROW 

STRAWBERRIES 



L A. Simonson Distributes 

Plants to Entrants in 

Garden Contest. 

The demand for strawberry plants 
was strong at the home of L. A. Si- 
monson, 2102 West Superior street, 
last evening and this morning. Chil- 
dren from all parts of the West end 
who had entered Into the West End 
Commercial club's garden contest 
flocked to Mr. Slmonson's home to pur- 
chase the plants and It was expected 
that the supply would be exhausted 
before this evening. 

It is planned to give four prizes for 
the best strawberry garden. These 
four prizes win be apportioned one to 
each of the four school districts, the 
Adams, Munroe, Ensign and Lincoln. 
Similar prizes will be awarded for the 
best general garden, the best flower 
garden, the best display of vegetables 
and the best potatoes. 

Members of the committee expect 
to have about $100 to distribute among 
the four schools. The amount of the 
prizes will depend on the amount sub- 
scribed toward the fund by the busi- 
ness men. James Maghan, member of 
the committee. Is securing the sub- 
scriptions and has now about half of 
the money needed. 

The committee has the names of over 
600 children enrolled in the contest. 
It Is figured by West end people that 
this garden contest will mean the sav- 
ing of hundreds of dollars to West 
end people In the free food it brings 
to their table. Where the contestants 
live every Inch of available space has 
been dug up and planted and in many 
cases adjoining vacant lots have been 
converted Into gardens. 



HERMANTOWN FARMERS 
E LECT O FFICERS. 

At the meeting of the Hermantown 
Farmers' Produce club held last night 
at the Washington school of the town 
of Herman officers were elected and 
committees appointed. Plans were 
made to meet twice a month during 
the season. 

The officers elected are: E. a. Law- 
yer, president; Otto Witte, vice presi- 
dent; Gust Lueck, secretary, and F. W. 
Ruhnke, treasurer. The following 
ooiitmittees were appointed: City mar- 
ket, John Potzln, F. W. Ruhnke, Ben- 
jamin Klosowsky; roads, J. H, Grady, 
Otto Witte, Charles Wittich. Henry 
Wegener and John Potzln; telephones, 
F. W. Ruhnke. E. S. Lawyer, Leo Witte, 
Charles Wlttlch and J. H. Grady. 

The club will make a campaign this 
summer for good roads. Telephone con- 
nections with the city is another Im- 
provement which farmers want and in- 
tend getting this year. It is claimed 
that about half of the farmers of the 
town want the 'phones In their homes 
and a petition asking for this im- 
provement will be circulated and 
turned over to one of the compa- 
nies. 



LOCAL GOIIMinEE 
TO HOLD MEETING 



Plans Will Be Made for Con- 
ference of Swedish Bap- 
tist Churches. 

Plans for the annual conference of 
the Swedish BapUst churches of 
America which will be held at the 
First Swedish Baptist church, Twenty- 
seoond avenue west and Third street 
on Sept. 9 to 14, will be made at a 
meeting of the general committee to 
be held on Tuesday evening In the 
church parlors. Rev. Swaney Nelson, 
pastor of the church is chairman of 
the general committee. 

Announcement will be made of the 
membership of other committees at 
this meeting. Tlie chairmen of the 
committees already appointed are; 
Finance, Andrew Bergqulst; reception, 
Charles Person; and usher, Louis 
Bergquist. The ladles' aid societies 
have been asked to prepare plans fof 
serving meals to the visitors during 
the convention days. 

It Is planned to get out a large por- 
tion of the congregation in order to 
have as many members take active 
part In the enteitalnlng of delegates 
as possible. It Is estimated that about 
500 delegates frcm various parts of 
the United States and Canada will at- 
tend, as well as ever 1.000 visitors in- 
terested in the praceedings of the con- 
vention. 



CANCER FATAL TO 

LOUIS C. BEAURIVAGE. 



Louis C. Beaurl 

pioneer resident o 

at 6 o'clock last 
2527 West Second 
illness of two yea 

Mr. Beaurlvage 
luth for thirty-tw 
til two years ag 
Hazelwood Park 1 
avenue west. He 
daughters, Mrs. i* 
Harbors and Jean 
one son, Emll. He 
er. Francis, who 
Mass. 

Mr. Beaurlvage 
the Catholic Ord. 
Modern Woodmer 
World and the S 
society. 

The funeral wl 
morning at 9 o'clc 
de Baptlste Fren 
Twenty-fifth aver 
street. Interment 
vary cemetery. 



vage, 59 years old, a 
f the West end, died 
jvening at his home, 
street following an 
rs from cancer, 
has resided In Du- 
o years. He was un- 
o proprietor of the 
lotel on Thirty-ninth 
leaves a widow two 
. J. GIroux of Two 
ette Beaurlvage, and 
also- leaves a broth- 
lives In Lawrence, 

was a. member of 

r of Foresters, the 

1, Woodmen of the 

t. Jean de Baptiste 

II be held tomorrow 
ck from the St. Jean 
2h Catholic church, 
ue west and Third 
will be made in Cal- 



Hillside Club Meeting. 

The West End Hillside Improvement 
olub will hold Its meeting this evening 
at tlie Ensign school. Twenty-third 
avenue west and Third street. A 
number of important matters pertain- 
ing to this district will be brought up 
among which will be the Indorsement 
of the upper part of Miller's creek for 
a public bathing place for children 
and a request for more street lights on 
some of the streets near the hilltop. 

West End Briefs. 

The Bryant Mothers' club will hold 
a meeting In the school this evening. 
A program of music and speeches has 
been planned. Miss Katherine King, 
principal of the school is In charge or 
the program. 

The Adams School Alumni associ- 
ation will meet in the school this 
evening to plan its annual banquet for 
the graduating class. 

Rev. Edward Erlckson, pastor of the 
Norwegian-Danish Methodist church, 
will leave tomorrow for Wright. Minn., 
where he will conduct services on Sun- 
day. 

Rev. James Sanaker, superintendent 
of the Rod River Valley district for 
Norwegian-Danish Methodist churches, 
will preach at both services at the First 
Norwegian-Danish M. E. church on 
Sunday. 

Miss Ruth Nelson, 2115 West Fourth 
street, will entertain this evening for 
the Young People's Society of the First 
Swedish Methodist church at her home. 
A feature of the meeting will be an 
experience social. 

Clarence Westerberg of Calumet, 
Mich., who has been visiting friends In 
this end of the city left for his home 
yesterday. 

Miss Ethel Soderstrom of Hlbbing is 
a guest of West end relatives this 
week. 



Child Dies. 

Napoleon, the ?-months-old son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Gudlas Royer. 126 South 
Twenty-sixth avenue west, died last 
evening. The f un jral will be held to- 
morrow morning at 8 o'clock from the 
family residence with burial in Cal- 
vary cemetery. 



Store Open Till 10:30 
Saturday Night 



Manhattan Shirts 
$1.50 and Up 




Bostonian 

Shoes and 

Oxfords 

$3.50, $4 

and $5 



Slip-On 
Raincoats 
$5 to $20 



The Big Duluth Takes First Place in the Following Events 



A wralkaway in the race for Suit and Overcoat supremacy; a clear field in the Hat Value handicap; 
the Gold Medal in the Shoe Quality contest; and a big field in the Haberdashery Free-for-all. 
AND IF YOU AHE GOING TO 

Dress Up on Decoration Day 

and it's summer clothes you want, and you are doubly anxious that your money have the greatest 
possible purchasing power, come Saturday and you'll certainly be mighty interested in 

THE BIG DULUTH CLOTHES 

Great values in Summer Suits and Overcoats at — 

$18, $ 20, $22.50 anJ $25 

Your Clothes Question — Answered! 

"THE BIG DULUTH SPECIAL'' ^t A A(\ 

Suits and Overcoats for W*n and Young Men |JPX"» xV | 

The Boys* Store 

Leading always in value-giving and showing the largest 
Assortment of Boys' Good Clothes in Duluth. 

SATURDAY SPECL\LS 

Boys' Blue Serge <t A Q^ 
Norfolk Suits ^^^70 

Ages 6 to 18 years; well made of all-wool serge. Coats 
made full Norfolk style and the knickerbockers are full 
lined; a regular $6.50 value; Saturday for C'A QC 

Young Men's Blue C t ^ CH 
Serge Norfolk Suits '4> > ^OU 

Sizes 32 to 37 chest. Every young fellow wants a Norfolk 
Suit. Here is a regular $15 all-wool blue serge Norfolk 
Suit; handsomely made with full Norfolk ^f ^ m\ 

Coat and Peg Trousers for only ^ k^*0\J 

Children's Novelty Suits 

for ages 2j^ to 10 years; handsomely made of all-wool 
serge, in a multitude of different shades; neatly trimmed 
with naval emblems. Suits that will please the little fellow 
and values that will please the parents; $2.45 and up. 

Boys' Summer Hats, Caps, Shirts, Blouses, Stockings 
and everything that a boy will want will be found here in 
a large variety. 



We'U Hat You Properly 

Show you thousands of the best hats in 
the world. 

HEADQUARTERS 
for John B. Stetson's Hats— $3.50 to $5.00. 

SOLE AGENTS 
for Mallory's Cravenette Hats — $3 and $3.50 
Gordon's— $3.00. Summer Caps— 50c to $2.00 

We'll Shoe You Correctiy 

Our word for it. Here you are assured 
complete satisfaction. 

Sole agents for Bostonian Shoes and Ox- 
fords— $3.50, $4.00 and $5.00. 

Sturdy Boys' Shoes for school or dress 
wear. 

A Host of Stimmer Fixings 

Headquarters for Manhattan Shirts — 
$1.50 and up. 

NECKWEAR— New Four-in-Hands just 
received; Bulgarian and other nobby pat- 
terns. "Have a new tie," 50c. 
GLOVES — Best makes only; all the new- 
est shades for dress and street wear — 
$1.00 to $2.00. 

IJNDERWEAR — Anything a man can want 
is here; every weight; silk, lisle or wool in 
union or two-piece suits — 50c to $5.00. 

Showing the greatest line of $1.00 shirts 
in Duluth. 




WILLIAIWISON Sl MEISJDEMHALL 



To Become National Orgranlxatlon. 

St. Paul. Minn., May 23. — ^The Me- 
morial Day a.sso::'Iation, Incorporated 
In St. Paul last >'ear soon will be a 
national orprnnization with branches In 



ITCHING STOPS 
WHEN POSLAM 
IS APPLIED 



Do not endure that awful Itching 
one day longer.